It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Great Pyramid of Khufu

page: 3
18
<< 1  2    4  5  6 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 10:47 AM
link   

originally posted by: Harte

We know they wrote about measuring slopes.
We know the slopes we find in Egyptian constructions match the Egyptian seked method of measuring slopes.

Why do you need to make something else up?

Harte


We measure today, using many different forms of measure for the same things.

To presume just because only one document survived, the Rhind Papyrus, which describes the seked, that this means the only way they thought about angles is rise over run, is to limit the Egyptians to one way thinkers, which would deny that contact with Babylonian ideas could influence their thought, and enabled them to look at angles using 360 parts of a circle.

Today we use degrees, dividing the circle into 360, which we have "inherited" from the same Babylonians. And we also use ratios like sine, cosine, tangent, cotangent, cosine, secant, etc..

and in the military we use radians and mils

and we use "gradians", where the "grads" divide the circle into 400, instead of 360, and we use "centigrads" and "milligrads"

so even we have multiple systems in use.

And the Egyptians had something like 4,000 years of civilisation, of which we have 1 document, the Rhind Papyrus, that mentions one method, the seked. Surely, they had more than one way of thinking about angles. Their neighbor civilizations did.

Why do you insist on limiting the Egyptians to the seked?

The Great Pyramid is placed at 30 degrees latitude. How did the seked give them that angle?




posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 11:34 AM
link   

originally posted by: AncientPheonix
26 Degree Angle? We all know the Egyptians were smart and loved to boast their mathematical abilities and also their astrological abilities.


Actually, they didn't. That was the Greeks.

Egyptians did not have astrology. Babylonians were the ones who developed astrology (See article on American Federation of Astrologers website)


So I started off with what did the Egyptians love, the stars.

Are you confusing them with the Babylonians? Nightime was a time of terror to the ancient Egyptians; a time when Re was in the underworld and Sekhmet and Bastet roamed the night with packs of demons, bringing misfortune and disease. They're associated with the Demon Days at the end of the year.



There are so many more examples of this number 26 being used, in alternative cultures and religions.
But what I'm trying to say here is this something that the Egyptians knew about and believed in?


They did not believe in the divinity of numbers, though the numbers three, five, and seven are often found in ancient Egyptian references (Wikipedia - though you should note that the examples are from many different time periods and aren't consistent (the number of pieces that Osiris was torn into, for example.)

There was no such thing as a "degree" in ancient Egypt. They expressed the slope of something as a fraction (a "seked") - the rise over the run. It's based on the Royal Cubit



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 11:38 AM
link   

originally posted by: AncientPheonix
a reply to: lostbook

So I have been doing more research on this and it has taken me down so many random roots.
This comment leads me to look at the 26Hz Vibration Level.

This freaked me out a little (probably just a huge coincidence).....

But the Egyptians loved cats, worshipped them!!!
Cats purr at a frequency around 26 Hertz which is supposedly the frequency of cell regeneration or self-healing.... Chillls


They didn't worship cats.

One of their oldest goddesses, Bastet, was originally a lion-headed female deity. Somewhere about the time of the Middle Kingdom (around 1500 BC or so) she becomes a housecat (about the time that cats domesticated themselves). The cat was a symbol of Bastet but cats were never worshiped (in fact, they were killed as sacrifices to Bastet - temples at Bubastis have millions of cat mummies and there was quite an industry producing cat mummies for the ancient Egyptian temples.)

Also... they didn't have any equipment to measure sound frequency.



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 11:42 AM
link   

originally posted by: AMPTAH

Look, we don't know what the AE knew.


I dunno. They left an awful lot of papyrus as well as teachers' syllabuses and their textbooks on math and surgery and so forth (as in, millions of manuscripts.) Some of this is also carved on temple walls (as at Karnak where there's a wonderful wall (I've seen it) with pictures of medical instruments and descriptions of some of the surgeries (I can read enough hieroglyphs to confirm that this is correct.)

That's a lot of writing. I would say that we have a handle on their beliefs and science.



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 11:43 AM
link   

originally posted by: JimNasium
(another power source) pyramid (Pyre=fire Amid=middle 'Fire in the middle"


"Pyramid" is a Greek word.

That's not what the Egyptians called them.



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 01:19 PM
link   

originally posted by: Byrd

I dunno. They left an awful lot of papyrus as well as teachers' syllabuses and their textbooks on math .


There are no textbooks on math.

Just the Rhind Papyrus. And a couple of fragments, two or three other small pieces of parchment , that barely contain some figures.



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 04:20 PM
link   

originally posted by: AMPTAH

originally posted by: Byrd

I dunno. They left an awful lot of papyrus as well as teachers' syllabuses and their textbooks on math .


There are no textbooks on math.

Just the Rhind Papyrus. And a couple of fragments, two or three other small pieces of parchment , that barely contain some figures.


You haven't looked much, have you.

Approximately 5½ m (18 ft) long and varying between 3.8 and 7.6 cm (1.5 and 3 in) wide, its format was divided into 25 problems with solutions by the Soviet Orientalist Vasily Vasilievich Struve[2] in 1930.[3] It is a well-known mathematical papyrus along with the Rhind Mathematical Papyrus. The Moscow Mathematical Papyrus is older than the Rhind Mathematical Papyrus, while the latter is the larger of the two.

Wiki

An 18 foot papyrus is hardly a "small piece of parchment," and I think you mean papyrus.

Harte



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 04:21 PM
link   

originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: JimNasium
(another power source) pyramid (Pyre=fire Amid=middle 'Fire in the middle"


"Pyramid" is a Greek word.

That's not what the Egyptians called them.

And the Greek term doesn't mean "fire in the middle."
That was an utterly ignorant claim made by one of the lower echelon fringe authors.

Hartee



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 05:03 PM
link   
a reply to: Byrd


Rather that be here or there, that is the descriptor being used to describe the pointy things in Egypt this thread was about.



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 07:57 PM
link   

originally posted by: JimNasium
a reply to: Byrd


Rather that be here or there, that is the descriptor being used to describe the pointy things in Egypt this thread was about.

"The pointy things."

THAT's what they called them!

Harte



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 08:23 PM
link   

originally posted by: JimNasium
a reply to: Byrd


Rather that be here or there, that is the descriptor being used to describe the pointy things in Egypt this thread was about.


Quite true, but it wasn't given the name pyramid until fairly late (after 600 BC). And it wasn't what the Egyptians called them (the "pyr-amid" fringe claim relies on that.)



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 08:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: JimNasium
(another power source) pyramid (Pyre=fire Amid=middle 'Fire in the middle"


"Pyramid" is a Greek word.

That's not what the Egyptians called them.

And the Greek term doesn't mean "fire in the middle."
That was an utterly ignorant claim made by one of the lower echelon fringe authors.

Hartee


Perhaps we should popularize links to the etymology site. I see a number of claims of this type. I had an advantage in that my biology studies required me to learn Greek and Latin roots (and I explored the Catholic Bible in Latin in church when I was small, so I learned a little bit about that language.)



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 09:18 PM
link   
So much disinfo concerning the earliest investigations of the pyramids.
Found this 1798 artists depiction of exploring the Sphinx, of course you shouldn't try to read too much into things..



www.ancient-origins.net...



posted on Mar, 2 2018 @ 10:40 PM
link   

originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: AncientPheonix
26 Degree Angle? We all know the Egyptians were smart and loved to boast their mathematical abilities and also their astrological abilities.


Actually, they didn't. That was the Greeks.

Egyptians did not have astrology. Babylonians were the ones who developed astrology (See article on American Federation of Astrologers website)


So I started off with what did the Egyptians love, the stars.
Are you confusing them with the Babylonians? Nightime was a time of terror to the ancient Egyptians; a time when Re was in the underworld and Sekhmet and Bastet roamed the night with packs of demons, bringing misfortune and disease. They're associated with the Demon Days at the end of the year.




There are so many more examples of this number 26 being used, in alternative cultures and religions.
But what I'm trying to say here is this something that the Egyptians knew about and believed in?


They did not believe in the divinity of numbers, though the numbers three, five, and seven are often found in ancient Egyptian references (Wikipedia - though you should note that the examples are from many different time periods and aren't consistent (the number of pieces that Osiris was torn into, for example.)

There was no such thing as a "degree" in ancient Egypt. They expressed the slope of something as a fraction (a "seked") - the rise over the run. It's based on the Royal Cubit



So they were all 5 yr olds having bad dreams?

These guys were using diamond encrusted copper saws to cut multi ton bricks out of bedrock.

Getting turned into peanut butter when someone screws up.

So why can we figure out their math?

Is that fake too?

Plumb bob and a puddle was enough, so I was told.

40 story's.

That's pretty big no matter how you slice it.

It is there so it was done, tell me a reasonable how.

Farmers pounding out 2 million stones and dragging them into place?

Ever try to make a farmer do stone mason work? How does that happen? Education? lol.

WTF is wrong with people?!










posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 12:44 AM
link   

originally posted by: burgerbuddy

originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: AncientPheonix
26 Degree Angle? We all know the Egyptians were smart and loved to boast their mathematical abilities and also their astrological abilities.


Actually, they didn't. That was the Greeks.

Egyptians did not have astrology. Babylonians were the ones who developed astrology (See article on American Federation of Astrologers website)


So I started off with what did the Egyptians love, the stars.
Are you confusing them with the Babylonians? Nightime was a time of terror to the ancient Egyptians; a time when Re was in the underworld and Sekhmet and Bastet roamed the night with packs of demons, bringing misfortune and disease. They're associated with the Demon Days at the end of the year.




There are so many more examples of this number 26 being used, in alternative cultures and religions.
But what I'm trying to say here is this something that the Egyptians knew about and believed in?


They did not believe in the divinity of numbers, though the numbers three, five, and seven are often found in ancient Egyptian references (Wikipedia - though you should note that the examples are from many different time periods and aren't consistent (the number of pieces that Osiris was torn into, for example.)

There was no such thing as a "degree" in ancient Egypt. They expressed the slope of something as a fraction (a "seked") - the rise over the run. It's based on the Royal Cubit



So they were all 5 yr olds having bad dreams?

These guys were using diamond encrusted copper saws to cut multi ton bricks out of bedrock.

Getting turned into peanut butter when someone screws up.

So why can we figure out their math?

Is that fake too?

Plumb bob and a puddle was enough, so I was told.

40 story's.

That's pretty big no matter how you slice it.

It is there so it was done, tell me a reasonable how.

Farmers pounding out 2 million stones and dragging them into place?

Ever try to make a farmer do stone mason work? How does that happen? Education? lol.

WTF is wrong with people?!



I'm afraid I don't get the drift of your comment there. Explain the 5 year olds and the diamond crusted saws and so forth?

If you've visited Giza (I have) you will see the tools lying around and see very clearly the marks of pounding stones where they pounded the rocks out of the bedrock. Nothing was sawed. It's plain old labor, and doesn't require a lot of training (just "hit here.") Limestone isn't that hard.

And yes, they worked - it was during the flood season when their fields were underwater and there wasn't reliable food. If you went to work on the pyramid, you got fed and got clothing (they didn't have coin back then, so food and clothing was quite valuable.)

They had done other large building projects, including THREE (possibly 4) pyramids for Khufu's father, Sneferu so they had active quarries and a number of trained crew. Before Sneferu got happy with pyramids, there were other stone buildings, including Djoser's step pyramid and its huge compound and the elaborate tunnels underneath it.

So there was over 200 years of building things (including stacking pyramids) by the time the GP was built. They knew how to set up work crews, how to prep the ground (and the shafts) and how to work on all four sides at once. They'd solved many problems by the time they got to the GP.

They'd also been sawing granite for awhile with hard copper saws and sand. They've done this experiment MANY times in the recent centuries and shown that it's possible (along with drilling using sand.) If you doubt it, you can easily do it for yourself - grab some granite and a wooden stick (softer than copper, but it works) and go to work. It takes much more time than diamond but is reliable since granite is not quite as hard as quartz.

So... I'm not seeing the drift of your arguments. It's late - I'm missing something, obviously. Care to elaborate?



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 05:38 AM
link   

originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: Harte

originally posted by: Byrd

originally posted by: JimNasium
(another power source) pyramid (Pyre=fire Amid=middle 'Fire in the middle"


"Pyramid" is a Greek word.

That's not what the Egyptians called them.

And the Greek term doesn't mean "fire in the middle."
That was an utterly ignorant claim made by one of the lower echelon fringe authors.

Hartee


Perhaps we should popularize links to the etymology site. I see a number of claims of this type. I had an advantage in that my biology studies required me to learn Greek and Latin roots (and I explored the Catholic Bible in Latin in church when I was small, so I learned a little bit about that language.)

IIRC, there are two lines of thinking on the etymology of "pyramid."
However, I'm quite certain neither involves the words "pyre" or "amid," much less "fire in the middle."

Harte



posted on Mar, 3 2018 @ 05:49 AM
link   

originally posted by: Cauliflower
So much disinfo concerning the earliest investigations of the pyramids.
Found this 1798 artists depiction of exploring the Sphinx, of course you shouldn't try to read too much into things..



www.ancient-origins.net...




The opening in the sphinx's head the pic shows has been known for centuries.
The hole is thought to have begun as a way to attach a headdress, and probably widened and deepened over the centuries as plunderers sought treasures.
The hole goes down about 6 feet and is about 5 by 5 feet. Or, it did.
It's been paved over now. I don't know if they filled it or not. I would think they would, for the sake of preserving the head.

Harte
edit on 3/3/2018 by Harte because: of the wonderful things he does!



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 03:25 PM
link   

edit on 4-3-2018 by AncientPheonix because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 03:41 PM
link   
All i can say is in say here laughing at how your Naming people as ignorant, yet being the most ignorant person in here


I understand you feel you know everything as you “teach” but that is the problem with Ancient History today.

Teachers and scientists looking at it from a narrow point of view because they have a “script” to stick to that can’t be broken and agenda to push.

If notice I said this post was a stretch and can clearly see it’s a bit of fun for the community and come together and look at these things, don’t be arrogant whilst here or all just delete all posts.


Please get of your high horse, because you sir are no better than any living thing on this planet.

a reply to: Harte



posted on Mar, 4 2018 @ 03:46 PM
link   
It baffles me that you and this Harte guy take your posts very seriously, yet referencing me to look at Wikipedia. Ha!

Some academics!!

If you have a notable source for me to check then please link.

If you reference Wikipedia again I’ll remove the post, as Wikipedia is only good at spreading disinformation.

I could go change Wikipedia to say the Egyptians originated from South America if I wanted too.
a reply to: Byrd



new topics

top topics



 
18
<< 1  2    4  5  6 >>

log in

join