It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

Woman says Roy Moore initiated sexual encounter when she was 14

page: 30
54
<< 27  28  29    31  32  33 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:16 PM
link   

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Greven

Legally, if one cannot be proven guilty, one is innocent of the crime. I am not going to state at this point that he is truly innocent, only that he is legally innocent. I believe he is truly innocent.

If I were to state that he is absolutely innocent of any wrongdoing without any evidence to support my claim, I would be as bad as you, placing myself in a position of mob-rule judge.


And what do you make of Moore's lawyer lying about what 'DA' meant?

And how do you know it was a lie? Are you playing mob-rule judge again?

TheRedneck

There isn't a chance to prove guilt as the claim cannot be acted upon, and statute of limitations doesn't apply to proof of innocence (something SCOTUS had to rule on for some idiotic reason after the government tried to say someone had gone so long not fighting a charge that it had been too long).

As to the DA, it seems I misread in my haste and tiredness. The lawyer lied about Moore meeting the accuser - his signature was stamped on a dismissal of the divorce proceedings. I would like to see proof that this Deborah Adams exists, though.




posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:16 PM
link   
a reply to: Greven


and recall this when people used those fancy fountain pens a lot more commonly than now

We're talking about 1977, not 1877.

Let me guess... you think the 'car' was horse-drawn too, right?

Sheesh...

TheRedneck



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:21 PM
link   
a reply to: Greven


I would like to see proof that this Deborah Adams exists, though.

I figured someone would suggest that.

12 results found for Deborah Adams in Gadsden, AL

TheRedneck



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:23 PM
link   

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Greven


and recall this when people used those fancy fountain pens a lot more commonly than now

We're talking about 1977, not 1877.

Let me guess... you think the 'car' was horse-drawn too, right?

Sheesh...

TheRedneck


Right....

You've never seen these?



I got one when I graduated as a gift. I think the company was "Cross" and it had my initials engraved in it. Pretty traditional gift. And I didn't graduate in 1877, unless I'm a time traveler...



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:27 PM
link   
a reply to: Kettu

Oh, sure, I have a few different sets. But they were a novelty item, not something you wrote with on the job (unless your job was calligraphy).

We had modern ink pens... believe it or not. They were delivered by Dinosaur Express back then.

Sheesh x2...

TheRedneck



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:31 PM
link   

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Greven


and recall this when people used those fancy fountain pens a lot more commonly than now

We're talking about 1977, not 1877.

Let me guess... you think the 'car' was horse-drawn too, right?

Sheesh...

TheRedneck

Ballpoint pens are not that old - they date back to WW2 as a commercial item, and they really caught on in the 1950s and 1960s. I know people who are in his age range that used fountain pens regularly. Although, to be fair, this was more likely a ballpoint or (most likely) a felt tip.

Cars are older than ballpoints. Felt tips are actually slightly more recently a commercial item.

Anyway, my point in bringing it up is to get people thinking about the potential ways it may have been done. Color photos and even our eyes can lie to us. Complicating that by the potential for the writing to have been done with writing instruments not as refined or typical as now.
edit on 22Thu, 16 Nov 2017 22:44:06 -0600America/ChicagovAmerica/Chicago11 by Greven because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:42 PM
link   
a reply to: TheRedneck

Actually, back in the 70's they were actually fairly widely used...that's why they were given as gifts originally.

They fell out of popularity starting in the 60's when ballpoint pen production started to replace them. They were seen as "more formal" and a lot of older people still continued to use them because they liked the way they wrote. I remember plenty of people using them into the early to mid 80s in office/professional settings, especially people in management/legal settings.

They were horribly leaky in pockets though, and younger people adopted to the ballpoint and grew up using that instead since they were cheaper and easier to use.

They kind of faded into something reserved only for the most formal of occasions. I still see them on rare occasions in use for important document signings.



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:47 PM
link   

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Willtell

None of this would be needed if Moore could simply examine the evidence. Allred is withholding it.

TheRedneck


Why would the Plaintiff's attorney not release EVIDENCE for unbiased inspection? That's damning in and of itself, according to legal experts, and common sense.



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:49 PM
link   

originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Willtell

None of this would be needed if Moore could simply examine the evidence. Allred is withholding it.

TheRedneck


Why would the Plaintiff's attorney not release EVIDENCE for unbiased inspection? That's damning in and of itself, according to legal experts, and common sense.


Yes this is the most relevant point.

Questions of pens, who was in the courtroom, etc are all irrelevant.

If the yearbook signature is moores, then the accuser and her attorney should jump at the opportunity to prove it.

Their hesitation speaks volumes.



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:52 PM
link   
a reply to: Kettu

In 1977, I was in high school, regularly using ball point pens. I have yet to use a fountain pen except for calligraphy. Most of the ones I have have never had had ink in them. They're just a nice gift.

I don't remember exactly when, but calligraphy went out of style. I seem to remember it was when Windows started getting popular and you could do it on a computer. Too bad; I enjoyed it.

It's really frustrating when someone tries to explain to me what happened during my life. Remember I live less than 2 hours from Gadsden. I think I know what was in widespread use in this part of Alabama, thank you very much.

TheRedneck



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 10:54 PM
link   
a reply to: Grambler


If the yearbook signature is moores, then the accuser and her attorney should jump at the opportunity to prove it.

And if the yearbook signature is a forgery, the accuser and her attorney should delay allowing it to be closely examined by experts.


TheRedneck



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 11:10 PM
link   
a reply to: Greven

This could've been settled today but there's tomorrow.

Nelsons attorney and Moores attorney can agree to have examination of yearbook by neutral experts right away.

Thats been requested by Moores Attorney - why would Nelsons Attorney have a problem with that I wonder.

Did ya see dodgy interview where Nelsons Attorney refused multiple times to say it was not forgery to Wolf Blitzer

But yup you keep right on believing it's veracity.



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 11:27 PM
link   

originally posted by: Grambler

originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Willtell

None of this would be needed if Moore could simply examine the evidence. Allred is withholding it.

TheRedneck


Why would the Plaintiff's attorney not release EVIDENCE for unbiased inspection? That's damning in and of itself, according to legal experts, and common sense.


Yes this is the most relevant point.

Questions of pens, who was in the courtroom, etc are all irrelevant.

If the yearbook signature is moores, then the accuser and her attorney should jump at the opportunity to prove it.

Their hesitation speaks volumes.


Yes sir! The Liberal Media goes into LYNCHING MODE when someone in Trump's orbit refuses to turn over a document.

Today, they were labeling Jared Kusher as a guilty traitor, because he didn't turn over a document to Mueller's witch hunt.



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 11:40 PM
link   

originally posted by: Grambler

originally posted by: carewemust

originally posted by: TheRedneck
a reply to: Willtell

None of this would be needed if Moore could simply examine the evidence. Allred is withholding it.

TheRedneck


Why would the Plaintiff's attorney not release EVIDENCE for unbiased inspection? That's damning in and of itself, according to legal experts, and common sense.


Yes this is the most relevant point.

Questions of pens, who was in the courtroom, etc are all irrelevant.

If the yearbook signature is moores, then the accuser and her attorney should jump at the opportunity to prove it.

Their hesitation speaks volumes.


oh it's his.

and the debate is always the same, like 2 siblings around 7 and 8 years old.. 'why am i being judged harder than my sibling who committed similar' faux pas'? '

is it a question of guilt or pointing out other guilty parties to make the guilty seem not that bad by' proxy'

pathet...



posted on Nov, 16 2017 @ 11:46 PM
link   
a reply to: odzeandennz


oh it's his.

You seem quite certain. Tell me, why was the style of the 7s in 12-22-77 and 1977 so dissimilar? Why did he place the letters "DA" after his name? Why was the name of the restaurant in a script that was almost printed instead of written? Why was the 'R' in Roy so different than samples of his signature? Why were the penstrokes much closer together and less pronounced in the message than in the signature?

TheRedneck



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 10:18 AM
link   

originally posted by: Greven

What professional just outright claims he didn't know her without checking whether or not he had, even though it's quite possible that he had met her one or multiple times while serving as a judge?


I do believe he chased young women in the past I just think you are stretching it to suggest he lied based on her appearing in his court XX years ago. Just crossing paths in life does not equate to actually knowing who someone is.



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 10:22 AM
link   

originally posted by: odzeandennz

is it a question of guilt or pointing out other guilty parties to make the guilty seem not that bad by' proxy'



There is very little question if there is no proof, and when you suggest you have proof you kind of need to show it to prove your point. I could say "odzeandennz tried to fondle my breast in 19XX" and so what does that mean to you with just that?



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 11:31 AM
link   
Looks like Fox is now realizing what a pedophile Moore is and is coming out against him. This could be a problem for Roy even on the outside chance he does get elected.

www.rawstory.com...
edit on 17-11-2017 by olaru12 because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 01:49 PM
link   
So Gloria Alred refuses to verify the signature is authentic while doing an interview with CNN. She agreed to let the signature be compared to Moores however we are now 4 days in and she has still refused to allow the comparison to occur.



posted on Nov, 17 2017 @ 01:54 PM
link   
a reply to: Xcathdra

Signatures change over the decades. The ink age test will be the most reliable determiner of whether it is a forgery or not.



new topics

top topics



 
54
<< 27  28  29    31  32  33 >>

log in

join