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Irma turning into monster hurricane, "Highest windspeed forecasts I've ever seen".

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posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 02:42 AM
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Dear ATS Readers, Writers,

A couple ATS writers have mentioned in passing the storm Irma brewing in the Atlantic heading towards Puerto Rico..

It has now become a Cat 3 hurricane, and expected to become a Cat 5 by landfall....




Hurricane Irma continues to strengthen much faster than pretty much any computer model predicted as of yesterday or even this morning. Per the National Hurricane Center's (NHC) latest update, Irma is currently a Cat-3 storm with sustained winds of 115 mph but is expected to strengthen to a devastating Cat-5 with winds that could top out at 180 mph or more. Here is the latest from the NHC as of 5PM EST


Irma Turning Into Monster Hurricane: "Highest Windspeed Forecasts I've Ever Seen"

This storm is still some days away from USA shores. Sad to think that another terrible storm will likely strike so soon after the disaster in Texas region...

Lets keep an eye on this one too; and as we have seen in Texas... discretion is the better part of valour; evacuate if you are in its sights in a week from now. Take your pets with you too...

Pravdaseeker




posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 02:50 AM
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One of the best places I ever found to track 'canes when we lived in FL was via Jeff Masters' blogs on Wunderground. Here's the most recent post:
www.wunderground.com...

The comments section has generally always been a treasure trove of links between NHC updates. If nothing else, the armchair mets really do teach the lurkers some valuable meteorology understanding.

Just keep an eye on Irma, no need to freak out yet. Some previous predictions for strong storms have fallen apart in the past, it just depends on atmospheric conditions. Something as simple as a minor change in wind shear can make or break a storm in the middle of the ocean, no matter how threatening the early long ranges seem.
edit on 9/1/2017 by Nyiah because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 05:46 AM
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One hurricane would be enough for me to move away from the gulf coast. I couldn't bare the stress of worrying about hurricanes destroying my home every year. I feel bad for these people. I'm sure many are now worried about Irma.

They say only 1 in 6 have flood insurance.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 05:49 AM
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I grew up in Florida and have been through my share of storms. I must admit this one is making me a little nervous. One reason being that my news station has been pointing it out now for 4 days. Even day one of their reporting they couldn't hide the concern on their face either.

I do know I'm going to start now getting some things though. Either way Ill have stuff and not have to fight the crazies for it



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 06:04 AM
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I head about some poor dogs and other animals abandoned and died.. during the last storm.

So PLEASE PLEASE.. take your animals to safety.

And if you insist of riding out the storm, PLEASE think of the stress that a storm like that put on your pet.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 06:06 AM
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a reply to: WeRpeons

What I cannot understand for the life of me, is why houses in at risk areas are STILL being built as if they were in a totally weather safe area.

Its pretty simple. In a flood plain? Build houses to totally mitigate the flood threat, with pressure seal capable entrances and windows, with the ability to totally lock the place down like a submarine in extremis. In a tornado prone area? Build the majority of the dwelling underground, hardened like a bunker, and bolted to the damned bedrock if necessary. In a hurricane area? Again, flood protection must be built in so that no flood could move the home from its foundations, nor penetrate its outer shell during high water, AND the building must be shaped so that the wind moves around it, rather than pushing, pulling, or otherwise moving it or any component thereof, AND so that any debris hitting it deflects, rather than penetrates it.

Insuring THAT kind of property against the things it has been built to withstand perfectly well, would be a damned sight cheaper, and be more responsible on the part of house builders and local governance.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 06:26 AM
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a reply to: pravdaseeker

National Flood Insurance Program was already $23-29 billion in debt BEFORE Harvey.... if this thing comes through we're looking at a huge issue for the program and many of the underwriters for these flood policies.

I pray that this thing stays out in the Atlantic and does minimal damage if any... but Mother Nature will do what it wills




posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 06:41 AM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: WeRpeons

What I cannot understand for the life of me, is why houses in at risk areas are STILL being built as if they were in a totally weather safe area.

Its pretty simple. In a flood plain? Build houses to totally mitigate the flood threat, with pressure seal capable entrances and windows, with the ability to totally lock the place down like a submarine in extremis. In a tornado prone area? Build the majority of the dwelling underground, hardened like a bunker, and bolted to the damned bedrock if necessary. In a hurricane area? Again, flood protection must be built in so that no flood could move the home from its foundations, nor penetrate its outer shell during high water, AND the building must be shaped so that the wind moves around it, rather than pushing, pulling, or otherwise moving it or any component thereof, AND so that any debris hitting it deflects, rather than penetrates it.

Insuring THAT kind of property against the things it has been built to withstand perfectly well, would be a damned sight cheaper, and be more responsible on the part of house builders and local governance.


That market is wide open for conquest. Get over here, put your wisdom to use, and make a billion dollars and exchange them to pounds once you return to the good ol UK.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 07:06 AM
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We live in the Florida keys now and this one is making me really nervous ! ...Our house is on concrete stanchions , and our first floor is 15 feet up off the ground. we would leave if its A cat 2 or higher . We pay a hefty flood insurance every year $7,500 for just flood...that's not wind, or regular insurance either. We have been shopping around for cheaper insurance but Fema sets the standards and its highway robbery ! If our house floods at 15 + feet off the ground , then there's bigger problems ,like the whole Florida keys will be erased . ....but this Irma is making nervous .
edit on 1-9-2017 by Meldionne1 because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 07:20 AM
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originally posted by: onehuman
I grew up in Florida and have been through my share of storms. I must admit this one is making me a little nervous. One reason being that my news station has been pointing it out now for 4 days. Even day one of their reporting they couldn't hide the concern on their face either.

I do know I'm going to start now getting some things though. Either way Ill have stuff and not have to fight the crazies for it


I'd say to make sure you have your plans in place and your supplies, but just to keep an eye on it.

Remember that it has been over a decade since our last major hurricane landfalls, so it's understandable that everyone is a bit jumpy and ready to go off the deep end with doom and disaster before it's warranted.

It's still early. You're in that time to be aware it's out there and keep an eye on it.

We get something like this every winter in the midwest with big snow and ice events. It's still far enough out that you're just keeping a wary eye on it will you go about life and make quiet preparations.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 08:20 AM
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originally posted by: TrueBrit
a reply to: WeRpeons

What I cannot understand for the life of me, is why houses in at risk areas are STILL being built as if they were in a totally weather safe area.

Its pretty simple. In a flood plain? Build houses to totally mitigate the flood threat, with pressure seal capable entrances and windows, with the ability to totally lock the place down like a submarine in extremis. In a tornado prone area? Build the majority of the dwelling underground, hardened like a bunker, and bolted to the damned bedrock if necessary. In a hurricane area? Again, flood protection must be built in so that no flood could move the home from its foundations, nor penetrate its outer shell during high water, AND the building must be shaped so that the wind moves around it, rather than pushing, pulling, or otherwise moving it or any component thereof, AND so that any debris hitting it deflects, rather than penetrates it.

Insuring THAT kind of property against the things it has been built to withstand perfectly well, would be a damned sight cheaper, and be more responsible on the part of house builders and local governance.


Thought provoking post! If people are going to live along the eastern seaboard and the gulf, then there needs to be a radical rethinking of building specs and architecture, in those areas, for new construction.

For the flood insurance that We the People underwrite, my opinion is that you get one bite of the apple if you experience a total loss from a flood in a known flood-prone area. You can take the money and rebuild elsewhere, or find a private insurer if you choose to stay.

Flood plains gonna flood and hurricanes gonna hurricane. There's a 100-percent chance that another hurricane will hit the coast of Florida and states along the gulf. If one can't afford flood insurance in those areas, move inland or to higher ground.

I do believe people should have the freedom to choose to live wherever they want. My gripe is with the insanity of the federal flood insurance program.

edit on 1-9-2017 by icanteven because: changed a word



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 08:26 AM
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a reply to: pravdaseeker


This storm is still some days away from USA shores. Sad to think that another terrible storm will likely strike so soon after the disaster in Texas region...

But "Expected" to be the worst ever now because of ...

Thats good for some mileage or wind speed.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 08:29 AM
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a reply to: icanteven


Thought provoking post! If people are going to live along the eastern seaboard and the gulf, then there needs to be a radical rethinking of building specs and architecture, in those areas, for new construction.

For the flood insurance that We the People underwrit

Thats what they sad a hundred years ago after the "Galveston Texas Storm Disaster".

In its wake everyone realized it was 'forevermore foolish' to build along the shore front.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 08:31 AM
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a reply to: pravdaseeker

It is not even predicted to hit land and you're saying it will be a cat five at landfall.
How about we give the doom and destruction a rest for a day or two.
Jesus H Christ.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 08:34 AM
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a reply to: TrueBrit

Doesn't matter. If you live where it rains you can get a flood.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: Sillyolme

Actually, there is no accurate prediction models of it for the long term. Any thing more than 5 to 7 days is a guessing game, even with the best data.

In other words: they really don't know where it's going to go.

So as with any weather event that has a chance to impact someone, they should keep an eye on it.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 08:43 AM
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a reply to: pravdaseeker

Hurricane Rita slammed Texas and Louisiana 18 days after Hurricane Katrina ended. If Hurricane Irma makes it this way, it'll be roughly the same time frame... Crazy stuff.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 08:47 AM
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originally posted by: WeRpeons
One hurricane would be enough for me to move away from the gulf coast. I couldn't bare the stress of worrying about hurricanes destroying my home every year. I feel bad for these people. I'm sure many are now worried about Irma.

They say only 1 in 6 have flood insurance.


You're kidding me! Only 1 in 6??? I was required to buy flood insurance on my house and I'm in a zone that hasn't ever flooded. Being within reach of a hurricane should be mandatory for people to buy flood insurance.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 08:48 AM
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a reply to: 4003fireglo

The thing is, there are people in the States who have the necessary skill set to involve themselves in projects like that, and have the resources necessary to either fund or attract funding for such a project.

I am not able to bring down the kind of financial backing for such a thing, otherwise I would have been on a plane when Katrina occurred, and this latest storm would have seen some people getting rained on, some roads become rivers, but a damned sight fewer homes becoming a total loss.



posted on Sep, 1 2017 @ 08:52 AM
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a reply to: Spacespider

and at least buy a cordless saw and take it to the attic with you in case you have to cut your way out. The Houston Mayor told people to take an axe with them so they can cut their way out if their houses flood and they're in the attic. I would think most attics aren't tall enough to give you the needed room and leverage to chop away..



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