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Breaking: US Navy destroyer takes on water after collision off Japanese coast

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posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 11:17 PM
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a reply to: clodbuster

The Burke class boats are fast, and they accelerate like a scalded cat. The official top speed is "in excess of 30 knots". Most container ships are probably more like 10-12. They're designed for range and efficiency, while the destroyer needs to keep up with a carrier.


edit on 6/16/2017 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 11:24 PM
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it doesn't sound like they have found any of the missing crew....


praying for a miracle here...



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 11:34 PM
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a reply to: dawnstar

If they're in the berthing compartment they probably won't until they pump it out. If they went overboard there's a chance they'll find them.



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 11:37 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Can anyone familiar with ships guess if the accident damage indicates that the destroyer was moving? Those boats are so fast and manoveourable as indicated by the video it's hard to understand how this ever happened.



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 11:39 PM
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a reply to: clodbuster

Someone with more experience might be able to tell. They might have both been moving in the same direction, and hit at an angle as erik said it looks like.



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 11:44 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Think we'll find out the whole story or will it be kept secret? This skipper is in big trouble I would say.



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 11:47 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

I certainly hope they weren't in the berthing cabin ("mess" in my days). A first in all collisions to the fore section was to close all water tight compartments as far back as the Echo bulkhead. A starboard hit such as this upon the USS Fitzgerald may have seen all those hatches closed from around 5 delta deck starboard and upwards and the starboard bravo to foxtrot compartments sealed if the ship was taking water. Of course get as many hands out as possible but rushing water makes it difficult to close a hatch hence they are sealed ASAP, else someone will close the hatch behind you next deck above or next bulkhead behind.

Sorry I went on there but it brings back memories.

my regards,

bally



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 11:50 PM
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a reply to: clodbuster

We might not find out all the details, but I'd be willing to bet we find out quite a bit. There was a surprising amount of detail released when the San Francisco hit the sea mount.



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 11:52 PM
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a reply to: bally001

The USNI link I posted earlier said that two berthing compartments flooded along with a machine room. With it being that early in the morning there's a pretty good chance there were sailors there sadly.



posted on Jun, 16 2017 @ 11:57 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

That would be tragic. In bumpy seas up the fore you'd strap yourself in. Hope it was calm and the ratings are okay.

bally



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 12:08 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

Was there a thread here made about that incident? I'd be curious to look at what happened there.



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 12:17 AM
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posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 02:57 AM
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a reply to: silo13
Is there anything that can't be blamed on Trump?


USS Fitzgerald collision: Trump criticised for leaving key posts unfilled

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posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 03:17 AM
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a reply to: clodbuster

If you read 'theguardian' I guess no.

Second line

bally




posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 04:24 AM
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Looks like the Navy thinks that they always have right of way.

In the early hours of 12 August 2012, USS Porter collided with the MV Otowasan.

They even seem to have been damaged the same section as the Fitzgerald.

USS_Porter_(DDG-78)
edit on 17-6-2017 by moebius because: fix link



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 04:37 AM
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The cargo ship did an unexpected u-turn and started travelling back in the direction it had come from before colliding with your ship, then carrying on with it's original journey.

Sounds odd.



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 04:52 AM
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a reply to: silo13

There are no circumstances I can imagine, in which a highly trained crew ought to have permitted this enormous, lumbering cargo vessel to strike their ship. The Fitzgerald is a powerful, agile craft, faster than the cargo ship and far easier to control and direct away from a collision.

No matter what time of day or night, or what manner of weather is being experienced, this collision should not have been possible, unless one of perhaps two scenarios is the case.

First, the navy vessel had an engine or navigation failure, and simply could not actually move away from the threat...

Second, someone on board, probably a great number of people, just failed to do their jobs even remotely correctly.



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 05:30 AM
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a reply to: Power_Semi

Source?

I have not seen this information anywhere.



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 05:47 AM
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a reply to: Power_Semi

It does sound odd, but here's a link to support it.


ACX Crystal’s automatic tracking system shows the ship steaming east at about 21 mph before slowing down slightly and abruptly circling back west, according to public data shown on MarineTrafffic.com.

The data shows the ship returning full circle to a previous point at about the time of the reported incident. The ship then travels at about 4 mph shortly afterward before returning to full speed and heading toward Tokyo Bay.

www.stripes.com...



posted on Jun, 17 2017 @ 05:49 AM
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a reply to: Flyingclaydisk

we posted at the same time, duh!
Star's and stripes is pretty legit source? I think?







 
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