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The ABC Preon Model. Prediction for the Higgs Mass.

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posted on Apr, 7 2017 @ 06:17 AM
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This is the fourteenth thread in the series on the ABC Preon Model. Links to earlier threads will appear in the comment below.

The discovery of the Higgs Boson was announced in 2012. But, similar to the top quark discovery which was discussed in thread 12 of this series, the discovery of the Higgs actually involves finding decay products, not the Higgs itself, since the Higgs decays too quickly to appear within the detector apparatus. In thread 13 we looked at the decay channels of what is presently known as the Higgs Boson, and we saw how all of those decay channels are predicted by the ABC Preon Model. In this thread we will look at the other important aspect of the discovery announced in 2012 - its mass.

In thread 13 it was shown that what is known as the Higgs signature instead arises from an A, an anti-A and a B preon when understood from the ABC Preon Model. In thread 9 it is shown that the mass of an anti-A plus the mass of a B equals m_W, where m_W is the mass of what is known as the W boson, and that the mass of the A is equal to m_Z/2, where m_Z is the mass of what is known as the Z boson. Hence, by the ABC Preon Model, the mass of what is known as the Higgs should be m_W + m_Z/2, or 126.0 GeV/c^2, or 125.98 +/- 0.02 GeV/c^2 if we expand things to another significant digit.

At the present time, the Higgs mass is claimed to be 125.09 +/- 0.24 GeV/c^2(Ref. 1). This result is between three and four standard deviations away from what the ABC Preon Model predicts for the mass. However, it is important now to take a deeper look at Ref. 1.



Above is a figure extracted from Ref. 1. As can be seen, the presently claimed Higgs mass comes from four separate experimental result sets, with two experiments from each of two collaborations. The ATLAS collaboration results of the two photon decay channel measured the Higgs mass to be 126.02+/-0.51 GeV/c^2. The CMS collaboration results of the two photon decay channel measured the Higgs mass to be 124.70+/-0.34 GeV/c^2. The ATLAS result for the four lepton decay channel measured the Higgs mass to be 124.51+/-0.52 GeV/c^2. And the CMS result for the four lepton decay channel measured the Higgs mass to be 125.59+/-0.45 GeV/c^2. These four results are then combined to arrive at the final result of 125.09 +/- 0.24 GeV/c^2.

On Arbitrageur's most excellent AMA thread Arbitrageur, ErosA433 and I had a discussion concerning the error estimate given in Ref. 1 for the combined result. I argued my position that the real error estimate should be significantly larger than the +/- 0.24 GeV/c^2 that is proclaimed. Click here if you wish to get into the details of that discussion.

As can be seen, the ABC Preon Model mass prediction of 126.0 GeV/c^2 matches the ATLAS two photon result nearly exactly, is about four standard deviations away from the CMS two photon result, about three standard deviations away from the ALTAS four lepton result and within one standard deviation of the CMS four lepton result. Given the results and their spread of values, I believe it is entirely possible that further experimentation will show a Higgs mass close to 126 GeV/c^2 because so many other experimental results are lining up to support the ABC Preon Model.

One of the reasons for my optimism that the eventual Higgs mass will be close to 126 GeV/c^2 comes from what happened with the W, Z, and top quark masses. Several years ago the derived masses of the A, B and C preons, (which are based on experimental values of the W mass, Z mass and deep inelastic scattering momentum partitions) led to a top quark prediction that was off by about 1 GeV/c^2. With the passage of time, further experimentation led to better estimates for the W, Z, and top quark masses. And with those better mass estimates the ABC Preon Model prediction is now in excellent agreement with measurements of what is known as the top quark mass. I believe a similar evolution will be seen in the mass of what is known as the Higgs, eventually bringing it into agreement with the prediction of the ABC Preon Model.




 
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