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Woolly mammoth on the verge of resurrection, scientists say-“de-extinction”

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posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: seasonal

Yes I seen the episode also that is looking for survivors of this animal in the while but its no clear as they are supposed to be very shy and elusive.




posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 10:38 AM
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Why do they not use an african elaphant they bigger? If they can 'program' dna like this. I guess it is best not to know or ask what 'programming' they had done already on with what.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 10:41 AM
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a reply to: Christosterone

Your view is firmly placed in logic and I respect your views.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 10:44 AM
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Don't worry, we're gonna exterminate them again



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 10:44 AM
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originally posted by: seasonal
a reply to: djz3ro


That is a prehistoric looking bird, I vote for it too.

Doh!
Doh!
According to Homer Simpson.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 10:45 AM
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a reply to: ignorant_ape

This will fold into lots and lots of different things. I imagine this is made easier because of the frozen mammoths in Russia.

We humans don't do things because we need to, I don't need to type this, I choose to.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 10:46 AM
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a reply to: butcherguy

Plus look at those drum sticks, yum, yum.


(post by Argentbenign removed for a serious terms and conditions violation)

posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:00 AM
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a reply to: Argentbenign

Can I get a source?




posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:04 AM
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Ok, de-extincting sounds kinda nifty despite the Jurassic Park issues- yes, saber-toothed tiger and dodo would be amazing additions to the woolly mammoth, but, yes, you guessed it, my vote is for the largest (known) rodent to exist:

Josephoartigasia monesi

, an extinct species of South American caviomorph rodent, is the largest rodent known, and lived from about 4 to 2 million years ago during the Pliocene to early Pleistocene.[1][notes 1] The species is one of two in the Josephoartigasia genus, the other being J. magna.[1] J. monesi is sometimes called the giant pacarana, after its closest living relative, the pacarana (Dinomys branickii) in the family Dinomyidae.[1] The species may have weighed a ton, considerably larger than its closest living relative, the pacarana



The rodent's fearsome front teeth and large size may have been used to fight over females for breeding rights and may also have helped defend against predators, including carnivorous marsupials, saber-toothed cats, short-faced bears and terror birds.[4] The rodent may have lived in an estuarine environment or a delta system with forest communities,[1] and may have eaten soft vegetation.[5] It has been stated that J. monesi probably fed on aquatic plants and fruits, because its molars are small and not good for grass or other abrasive (vegetation). Larger mammals also have the advantage of access to low-quality food resources, such as wood, that smaller species are unable to digest.[4] Finite element analysis was used to estimate the maximum bite force of J. monesi.[6] This study concluded that the bite of J. monesi possibly generated up to 4165 N of force, three times as powerful as predicted for modern day tigers.[7] The study also speculated that J. monesi behaved similarly to elephants, utilizing its incisors like tusks for digging or defense.[6]


edit on 2162017 by seattlerat because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:13 AM
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I'm completely for this. We need to explore and push the boundaries of our knowledge. Although I can't help but think that we may have been responsible for delivering the final blows to the mammoth, there are currently extant species we're quickly killing off. That seems like the bigger priority.

They are using Elephus Maximus because it is more similar genetically to the Mammoth than Laxadonta Africana. Smilodons would be pretty neat but, they were pretty distantly related to modern felids, so, much harder to find a base genome to edit and surrogate womb to incubate them with.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:25 AM
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Mmmmmmm...Mammoth Ribs!



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:26 AM
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Hello!

Zombie apocalypse!
Planet of The Apes!
Jurassic Park!

We are going to doom mankind, because. . . elephants.

Way to go science!




posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:30 AM
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a reply to: DBCowboy

That will mess up the ice age cartoon too ...think of the kids for Gods sake science .



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: the2ofusr1

I don't know if I'll be able to read any further posts because genetically created lab monsters will be chasing me for my flesh!

Science has doomed us all.

Way to go science!




posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:42 AM
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a reply to: IAMTAT

True, but would these be considered GMO?



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:49 AM
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a reply to: seasonal

I'm betting there are still a few Tasmanian Tigers around.

The Sabre Tooth is unlikely..I think the Mammoth is possible due to soft tissue discoveries..pretty cool.

The Dodo would be cool since it was wiped out exclusively by man.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:54 AM
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a reply to: vonclod

There could be some left overs taz. tigers.

There have been a few dodo sighting (reported), but it would be good experience for the future of making me obsolete.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 11:59 AM
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While I applaud the science going on here, I cannot help think that it's probably more important to preserve what we have got. The number of species on the critically endangered list, or the recently departed (i.e. extinct) list is a real worry, and a sad tale of man's disregard for the environment.

WWF critically endangered



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 12:02 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

Oh, cool I haven't heard that about the Dodo..they must have been tasty birds..easy to catch more likely.


We are all becoming obsolete
edit on 16-2-2017 by vonclod because: (no reason given)



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