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Woolly mammoth on the verge of resurrection, scientists say-“de-extinction”

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posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 05:39 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

tasmanian tigers are stil around. they have videos, in the next few years i assume they will have full on video or catch one again.




posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 05:58 PM
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a reply to: dantanna

I have seen that, I look forward to seeing if they are in fact still alive. I hope they don't see it on the side of the road after being hit though/



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 07:36 PM
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originally posted by: ignorant_ape
my #1 question - do we NEED a mannoth ?

seriously - this is a lot of work at cutting edge genetics - to creat a " mammoth "

i personally would rather see the funds equiment and expertise re-tasked to a food or medical program to either erradicate a genetic desiese or improve a staple crop that will deduce world hunger

mammoths are cool - but do we need them ??


They arent doing it to create a mammoth, they are creating a mammoth to learn how to do it.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:21 PM
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originally posted by: Shangralah
a reply to: seasonal

I would like to see them do this with a saber tooth Tiger.


I vote to bring back the dodo. I've always wondered what they tasted like.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:30 PM
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a reply to: seasonal

Many may wonder just why is this being done?
Apparently there is a reason aside from just assuming it can be done...
The reason behind it is high hopes to combat climate change...

www.inverse.com...
edit on 16-2-2017 by 5StarOracle because: Word



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 08:48 PM
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There've been stories abounding about huge wooley critter stompin' around the wilds for years.

Probably historically a species of dwarf mammoths existed 'til just over four thousand years ago.

....and on Crete. Up 'til about 11,000 years ago.

Legends among some of the first nations tribes hint at a later than thought survival, as well. Though no evidence other than anecdotal exists, so far as I know...and who knows what's knockin' about in the Siberian and Canadian wilderness. I've been in the Canadian wilderness, and while unlikely, it's not beyond the realm of possibility that up 'til very recently, mammoths could have survived--or still do.

I know, it's woo... But I've seen Bigfoot, so a huge elephant cousin isn't so far fetched as it might seem.



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 09:20 PM
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Mammoths? We don't need no stinkin mammoth....

BRING BACK THE BUNYIP!!



posted on Feb, 16 2017 @ 09:22 PM
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originally posted by: marg6043


Europe cloning experiments are more advance that here in the US because they are not as restricted.



That's why they are using the technique they are in this experiment. This isn't an actual cloning, it's a hybridization through genetic modification. The first generation will be 50% Mammoth 50% Asian Elephant. The second generation will be 75% Mammoth 25% Asian Elephant. The third gen 87.5% Mammoth 12.5% Asian Elephant and on and on... You get the idea.

It's iromi that they have to resort to the hybridization technique when it was just down the street from Harvard at U Mass Amherst, where the first human cells were cloned back in 1995. They terminated the experiment at the 32 cell stage(the zygote had undergone 5 divisions) and it was never implanted in a womb but this was a year before Dolly the sheep and proved to be a valuable tool for creating human stem cells without resorting to anything that could be considered unethical.



posted on Feb, 17 2017 @ 02:13 AM
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So it'd be like if they took a chimpanzee and changed its genes to make it less hairy and weaker. Still not a human.



posted on Feb, 17 2017 @ 02:26 AM
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a reply to: prevenge

I want a mammoth steak.



Should they do this it would be a very cool thing. Though I do have reservations about how far cloning should go...but the image of a mammoth or a group of same stompin' around appeals to my sense of wonder.



posted on Feb, 17 2017 @ 02:31 AM
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a reply to: Christosterone

Dire Wolf!



posted on Feb, 17 2017 @ 02:43 AM
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a reply to: Sunwolf

Ooh, that'd be cool!

Short-faced bears.

Link.

That's a whole lotta mean, right there.



posted on Feb, 17 2017 @ 03:17 AM
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originally posted by: seasonal
Woolly mammoth on the verge of resurrection, scientists say-“de-extinction”

The Lion Makers

(A tale from Panchatantra in India)


In a certain town were four Brahmans who lived in friendship. Three of them had reached the far shore of all scholarship, but lacked sense. The other found scholarship distasteful; he had nothing but sense.

One day they met for consultation. “What is the use of attainments,” said they, “If one does not travel, win the favor of kings, and acquire money? Whatever we do, let us all travel.”

But when they had gone a little way, the eldest of them said: “One of us, the fourth, is a dullard, having nothing but sense. Now nobody gains the favorable attention of kings by simple sense without scholarship. Therefore we will not share our earnings with him. Let him turn back and go home.”

Then the second said: “My intelligent friend, you lack scholarship. Please go home.” But the third said: “No, no. This is no way to behave. For we have played together since we were little boys. Come along, my noble friend. You shall have a share of the money we earn.’

With this agreement they continued their journey, and in a forest they found the bones of a dead lion. Thereupon one of them said: “A good opportunity to test the ripeness of our scholarship. Here lies some kind of creature, dead. Let us bring it to life by means of the scholarship we have honestly won.”

Then the first said: “I know how to assemble the skeleton.” The second said: “I can supply skin, flesh, and blood.” The third said: “I can give it life.” So the first assembled the skeleton, the second provided skin, flesh, and blood. But while the third was intent on giving the breath of life, the man of sense advised against it, remarking: “This is a lion. If you bring him to life, he will kill every one of us.”

“You simpleton!” said the other, “it is not I who will reduce scholarship to a nullity.” “In that case,” came the reply, “wait a moment, while I climb this convenient tree.”

When this had been done, the lion was brought to life, rose up, and killed all three. But the man of sense, after the lion had gone elsewhere, climbed down and went home.

And that is why I say:

“Scholarship is less than sense;
Therefore seek intelligence:
Senseless scholars in their pride
Made a lion; then they died.”

literatureandarts.wordpress.com...

*__-



posted on Feb, 17 2017 @ 03:21 AM
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a reply to: namelesss

Truth, that.

But there seems little harm in resurrecting a mammoth.

A short faced bear might not be the brightest of choices, though...
. But it'd sure be cool!



posted on Feb, 17 2017 @ 04:21 AM
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originally posted by: seagull
a reply to: namelesss

Truth, that.

But there seems little harm in resurrecting a mammoth.

Thank you for that smile that you found!
I have heard those words before; "But there seems little harm in resurrecting a mammoth"!
The irony was delicious!
I'd put that on my bumper, actually!
(There 'seemed little harm' in resurrecting the lion, too...)


A short faced bear might not be the brightest of choices, though...
. But it'd sure be cool!

See? That's the difference between Wisdom and 'education'. *__-
It won't be a philosopher, or an Enlightened, resurrecting your 'bear'... it will be an 'academic'.
Things are going to get wild...



posted on Feb, 17 2017 @ 04:44 AM
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to everyone expresising an interest in eating mammoth meat

what was your opinion of elephant meat ?

and if you havnt sampled it - why not

PS - i predict that mammoth will have an almost identical taste // texture

and the animals rearing // diet and cooking will make a bigger difference than taxonomy



posted on Feb, 17 2017 @ 04:46 AM
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a reply to: pirhanna

i shall simply re-affirm my earlier opinion

there are projects that will have a far more productive " end product " that these people can hone thier skills on



posted on Feb, 17 2017 @ 06:16 AM
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a reply to: namelesss

Those exact words? Where do you work, man? ...and can I get a tour?

Oh, I suspect, should this ever come to pass, that there will be a premium placed on workplace safety.

a reply to: ignorant_ape

If not, why not?

My local market doesn't seem to carry elephant...
...and Africa, or Asia are too far away to go hunting 'em.

I wouldn't be surprised if they did taste similar.



posted on Feb, 17 2017 @ 06:52 AM
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a reply to: seagull

appologies - the if not why not question was my snarky attempt to highlight the fact that no one has ever attempted " elephant farming "so what makes people think that mamoth farming will be viable

there are are reasons why we have the domesticated food // beast of burden animals that we do

PS - i has ignored the " elephant farming that goes on in asia - as thats breeding beasts of burden - not food animals



posted on Feb, 17 2017 @ 08:40 AM
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originally posted by: tehdouglas
So it'd be like if they took a chimpanzee and changed its genes to make it less hairy and weaker. Still not a human.


No. It wouldn't be like that at all. Mammoths and Asian Elephants are much more closely related than humans and Chimapanzee are. Much more recent genetic divergence.



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