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the black widdow

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posted on Nov, 29 2016 @ 10:27 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

wasn't the crash at Guam moisture in one of the wing sensors that made the B2 pitch almost straight up? i know its not the skin but i know the F-117 had its own special climate controlled hanger, im not sure about the B2 but im sure it had at least A/C hangers.

I wonder if the B@ had the same bat problem the nighthawk did




posted on Nov, 29 2016 @ 10:32 PM
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a reply to: penroc3

It was the pitot tube. They didn't turn on the pitot heat to clear the water. When they went airborne the computer read 10 degrees nose low and something like 25 knots fast.

All the early stealth aircraft need controlled hangars. The Hawaii F-22 unit needs them for their aircraft because they're parked within spitting distance (literally) of the ocean.



posted on Nov, 29 2016 @ 10:43 PM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

it looked like they tried to hang in there as long as they could before punching out.

would you say that is the ground crew or the flight crew's fault?

didn't go down the pre flight check list right ?



posted on Nov, 29 2016 @ 10:46 PM
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a reply to: penroc3

Both. Either one could and should have activated the heat to ensure that it was clear of moisture, especially in that environment.

They almost lost another one about the same time out there. It had an engine fire. It was two years before they could repair it enough to do a one time flight to the Depot for an 18 month PDM.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 01:38 AM
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I've always wondered.. well at least since I've read a few things... why the Pitot faces directly into the air stream.
It could be, I think, turned around and measure the vacuum (Bernoulli effect) instead of pressure as a result of speed.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 01:42 AM
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a reply to: paradoxious

Because it measures the wind speed doing down the tube. The static tube measures the static speed and it compares the two to get IAS.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 10:00 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

To the best of my knowledge, the designation YF-24 was not a typo. Lanni flew 10 different classified aircraft, all with non-standard designations. Most were foreign types.



posted on Nov, 30 2016 @ 11:12 AM
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a reply to: Shadowhawk

That was my understanding too, but the only official explanation I ever heard was that it was a typo. I don't think it was either though.
edit on 11/30/2016 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Dec, 1 2016 @ 12:12 AM
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a reply to: Zaphod58

So if it wasn't a typo and he wasn't testing a classified airframe, what kind of shenanigans could he have been involved with?



posted on Dec, 1 2016 @ 05:00 AM
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originally posted by: Zaphod58
a reply to: Maxatoria

Going to the UK actually opens some opportunities for testing, or even flying missions if it's an operational platform. Both LRS-B demonstrators were there during the fly off.


What the.....is this a Zaphod exclusive or can I find additional verification as not heard anything about this on any of the usual rumor mills.

Sort of makes sense if you wanted to fly proven assets against other countries air defenses but what could the UK offer up in terms of testing for demonstrators that couldn't be achieved in the US or Canada for 10% of the hassle?

The idea of having generally unproven classified US assets flying out of allied territory has never sat right with me but if BOTH were here at demonstrator stage- hell- all the stories might be true (Machrihanish, Boscombe etc)



posted on Dec, 1 2016 @ 10:30 AM
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a reply to: Jukiodone

There were several confirmations here when they were there. They were doing show and tell for others that were going to be operating with them, as well as testing against a few things in the UK and surrounding areas.



posted on Dec, 1 2016 @ 05:44 PM
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a reply to: Bfirez

It wasn't a typo. He was testing classified airframes. He flew 10 different classified aircraft, and made first flights in two of them. Most of these aircraft were foreign types acquired for technical and tactical exploitation. I suspect that at least one might have been something more interesting, but that is merely an educated guess. I asked him about the YF-24, and he said he couldn't talk about it. I didn't press the issue.




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