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The Mandela Effect Can No Longer Be Denied: Berenstein Was The Tip of The Iceberg

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posted on Jul, 28 2016 @ 02:38 PM
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a reply to: queenofswords

Well, yeah. That's exactly it. It is purely subjective. Incorrect memory is the only explanation that is backed by evidence and makes sense here. I'm certainly not saying it's the only possibility, there is just no evidence of any other hypothesis. I just don't see how anybody can KNOW FOR A FACT that their memory of something minor 20 years ago is accurate (like an "i" instead of an "e" in a book title they haven't read since childhood, or "a" vs "the" in a movie they haven't watched in over a decade, or how they remember a stretched rectangular map).

Now what you said about your school would be the perfect example of a major change. You went there every day for many years of your childhood, so something like that is ingrained into your head, so you know your memory of that is most likely correct and that the school hasn't changed locations. These are the types of ME that I have been looking for; big changes, where people notice that things they do every day suddenly change one day, and are able to give us dates and details. These examples are practically non existent, because the people that do those things on a daily basis generally remember them correctly the whole time.

Let's use the Berenstain Bears as an example. Most people haven't seen those books since childhood, and they were usually read to you by parents. I would like to hear from somebody that is a parent or teacher that has read the books on a consistent basis throughout the past 20 years. They would be able to pin point exactly when this change occurred.


edit on 7 28 16 by Barcs because: (no reason given)




posted on Jul, 28 2016 @ 02:42 PM
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originally posted by: queenofswords
a reply to: Barcs




They are acting like they cannot possibly have remembered something wrong,


If it weren't for the fact that thousands of people are "misrembering" the same things such as the position of Australia and South America, then I could buy into the faulty memory argument. If a few people misremembered the location of Australia, and a few others misremembered the location of Russia, and others misrembered some other random map location, the faulty memory would hold validity.

There are a few people that say parts of Europe look skewed, Italy, Scandinavia especially. Adding the tilt would address this complaint also.



posted on Jul, 28 2016 @ 02:46 PM
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a reply to: Barcs

I don't know how you could find evidence. From what I have read about the anomaly, the evidence pertaining to its past could not be located anywhere in this particular space in this particular time.

In other words, using my elementary school example, I would never be able to find the picture or the map that would validate my memory because it does not exist in this place. It exists "elsewhere" and that "elsewhere" is no longer where I am.



posted on Jul, 28 2016 @ 02:50 PM
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a reply to: Ruiner1978

them how do you explain that i always remember its position right?



posted on Jul, 28 2016 @ 02:56 PM
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originally posted by: queenofswords
a reply to: Barcs

I don't know how you could find evidence. From what I have read about the anomaly, the evidence pertaining to its past could not be located anywhere in this particular space in this particular time.

In other words, using my elementary school example, I would never be able to find the picture or the map that would validate my memory because it does not exist in this place. It exists "elsewhere" and that "elsewhere" is no longer where I am.


If there is no picture evidence, then it begs the question of why you would remember it differently. Our brains are like cameras except the pictures deteriorate over time.

This is the thing that doesn't make sense about ME. If these minor little things were being changed in the past, why would we not just remember them as the changed way, since they were allegedly altered prior to us being able to remember them in the first place? It invokes way too many supernatural unproven things to even begin to explain something like that.

Again, I'm not saying it's out of the question, but again, the major MEs that I asked about above are virtually nonexistent, but they SHOULD exist if this thing is really more than incorrect memory. Thousands of people can be wrong.


edit on 7 28 16 by Barcs because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 28 2016 @ 02:58 PM
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originally posted by: humanoidlord
a reply to: Ruiner1978

them how do you explain that i always remember its position right?

Because you didn't have the memory of the tilted position ingrained in your memory from being fascinated with my older brother's globe as a child.

I explained earlier.



posted on Jul, 28 2016 @ 03:07 PM
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a reply to: GoShredAK

You're new to this. This isn't the first thread. I did entertain it. Research showed me the correct answer.



posted on Jul, 28 2016 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: Ruiner1978

Think about that. You still haven't fully thought out the "tilt"...



posted on Jul, 28 2016 @ 03:23 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
a reply to: Ruiner1978

Think about that. You still haven't fully thought out the "tilt"...

The tilt changes depending on how the globe is set, the spine on the left or the right.
That what you're getting at?
Obviously it was set to the right on his desk. My brother didn't like me being in his room, let alone touch his stuff, therefore it always stayed in that position.

Anything else I can help you with?



posted on Jul, 28 2016 @ 04:01 PM
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a reply to: Barcs



It invokes way too many supernatural unproven things to even begin to explain something like that.


That's it. Too much we haven't discovered yet!

“There are things known and there are things unknown, and in between are the doors of perception.”
Aldous Huxley



posted on Jul, 29 2016 @ 07:53 AM
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a reply to: Barcs

I'm a parent and I used to read those books to my kids all the time. I don't have a date, because who thinks of that when they think something is not a profound thing, but I do remember sitting down with my kids with one of the books and it being a different spelling. I remember thinking 'what? I thought that was Berenstein.' I also remember thinking maybe it was Berenstain and we just pronounced wrong for so long, and I also remember thinking maybe for some reason they decided to change the spelling, which I thought was odd since it was a popular series of books.

So there is no 'proof' that anyone is desiring, but I know I experienced it.



posted on Jul, 29 2016 @ 09:24 AM
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a reply to: Ellie Sagan

You experienced a scientific effect yes, just not the ME. Your mind was adjusting your incorrect memory to bring it in line with the physical reality you had just noticed. Your incorrect memory is being recalled, which is a strong sensation in itself and the cause of deja vu. It then, typically, accepts that it was incorrect and corrects itself.

Some people confuse the strong sensation, caused by hormones and chemicals, for something more than it is, and refuse to accept that they could be wrong. You seem amendable to having been wrong, which is a positive thing.



posted on Jul, 29 2016 @ 10:27 AM
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a reply to: Ruiner1978

troll trololololololololooolololoolo
the mandela effect is a hoax



posted on Jul, 29 2016 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: Ellie Sagan

Thank you so much! I have a few follow up questions, and if you'd rather answer via PM I have no problem with that.

1. How frequently did you read those books to your children? (ie once a week, every night, once a month etc)

2. Can you give me at least a rough estimate on when it happened? It sounds like it happened back when your children were still young. Do you remember roughly how long you had been reading it to them before you noticed the change and maybe thinking of how old they were at the time can get us near a year, hopefully.

I'm not really looking for proof more of a data sample to add to my research. I'm really looking for common date estimates of changes in various MEs from people that noticed it happening at the time (rather than 10+ years later like many of them). Thanks again for the information.



posted on Jul, 29 2016 @ 02:33 PM
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originally posted by: humanoidlord
a reply to: Ruiner1978

troll trololololololololooolololoolo
the mandela effect is a hoax


A hoax you say?

Well, no. Its actually happening.

Real people are really experiencing the Mandela effect.

Whether its a wild case of mass faulty memories or something far more extraordinary is the question.

Something is happening and is certainly no hoax.



posted on Jul, 29 2016 @ 02:34 PM
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a reply to: GoShredAK

The question IS the hoax. Of course it's faulty memory. To entertain otherwise once facts have been provided is entertaining delusion.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 12:25 AM
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a reply to: heineken




what do you think will happen ?

I have no idea
More of the same inconsequential changes, probably. Maybe nice big ones, like there never having been twin towers in New York. God knows the MSM have been trying to erase those things from the collective conscious from the very first week.

But like I said in my second post, if it's just a memory thing then it seems to be remarkably uniform.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 08:24 AM
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Just finished watching Season 2 Episode 4 of Mr Robot. Seems Sam Esmail is down with all this. Got a screen capture.



As for the whole "Is this just English" argument, well yes, apparently.



So what's going on here? On the one hand we have what seems to be reality changed for certain people. It exists in hard copy as well as our minds. I can testify about Dorian Gray as I went into a bookstore just days ago and looked at the classics section.

In Australia the only major last brick and mortar store for books is Angus and Robertsons. They have this section of all the classics. Catch 22, A Clockwork Orange, Wuthering Heights, you know the drill. No one really buys these anymore, they're just there. Found the book and it's The Picture of Dorian Gray.

So, if you're of the persuasion that we are of the faulty memory group, then what's the explanation for so many of us having the "wrong" memory.

If you disregard the "Reality has changed" argument then you have to consider the "A false memory has been implanted on a large portion of the English speaking world" view.

This, in my view, is just as disturbing as a changed reality. For so many people to remember Berenstein when it was Berenstain all along is just as big a deal as the alternative.



posted on Jul, 30 2016 @ 08:36 AM
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a reply to: Barcs

I read them to them whenever they wanted, which could have been anywhere from once or twice a day, then tapering off when they lost interest for other books. It would have been a few years time, maybe? Around 13 to 16 years ago. I don't exactly know.



posted on Aug, 1 2016 @ 02:13 PM
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a reply to: Ellie Sagan

There's no point in responding to him, he's not interested in real discourse, just finding some excuse to dismiss your experience.

Jaden



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