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Whould you get in this if I told you it goes to the moon?

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posted on Apr, 9 2016 @ 01:01 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake




The Helium 3 and Titanium do not necessarily need to be returned to Earth but could be used for construction/energy purposes on the Moon or to build/power

There is not one device in existence that uses H3.
It's all theoretical.
Titanium ???
You have to launch and land equipment to dig it out of the moon.
You have to launch and land equipment to smelt it and purify it.
You have to launch and land equipment to roll and form it.
You have to launch and land equipment to cut shape and weld it.
You have to launch and land new engines from the factory on earth.
You have to launch and land new electronics.
You have to launch and land new plastics/rubber.
You have to launch and land people with masters degrees for labor.
Or you can have Elon Musk build and launch for cheap from earth.

Nothing on the moon is cheaper than on the earth.




posted on Apr, 9 2016 @ 01:14 PM
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a reply to: samkent

Just about everything on the Moon is "cheaper than on the earth", if you are on the Moon and have facility's to produce the desired product.

Nuclear fission was at one time only theoretical. Once fusion power comes of age it will require Helium 3 which is in abundance up there. And titanium is a perfect medium for constructing not only space ship hulls but all other sorts or required products.

Once we master or attain the ability to cost effectively launch materials into low earth orbit sending all the required equipment to our Moon may not be the problem you seem to imagine.

Im not going to try and convince you otherwise but our Moon will indeed be humanity's first step before proceeding on to the planets. Which is rather plain to see really.

edit on 9-4-2016 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 9 2016 @ 09:54 PM
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originally posted by: captainpudding
a reply to: zatara

It's amazing what conclusions you can draw from a 1 minute clip from an hour and twenty minute press conference when you ignore all the jokes and the laughing.


A while back someone responded to the videos of cherry-picked moments from the press conference where the astronauts were looking serious with a video of cherry-picked moments from the press conference where the astronauts were laughing and cracking jokes.



I have my own pet theory about the astronauts at the press conference: They really didn't give much of a damn about the adulation of the know-nothing public, press or politicians, but they were keenly sensitive to the respect of their peers - the fellow astronauts and test pilots who knew enough to appreciate the technical merits of what they had done. They were a fiercely competitive and hard-drinking bunch.

The astronauts were released from quarantine on a weekend, and the press conference was Monday morning, followed immediately by parades and a world-wide tour. That left barely one day to tear it up with their buddies. I am willing to bet that at least one and probably two of them were at least a little hung-over (the other one was just being himself).




posted on Apr, 9 2016 @ 11:09 PM
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a reply to: andy06shake




Just about everything on the Moon is "cheaper than on the earth", if you are on the Moon and have facility's to produce the desired product.

Not quite.
We have the facilities to produce all the consumer goods right here in the US.
But most smaller items come from Asia and cars are ramping up in Mexico.

The only case where moon construction would be cheaper is if they needed huge mass production.
There is no case where that would ever happen.
Even if an asteroid were on course for earth 20 years down the road, only a few thousand people would be sent off planet.



posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 12:38 AM
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a reply to: choos Looks like i was misinformed- does that measurement read 19.8 cm? !.98in ?.I certainly think Apollo 17 went to the moon.




posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 01:10 AM
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a reply to: Barcs just saying what an amazing series of evens,Neils heart rate probably went to 150bpm.Yes i used to have a HeathKit stereo,more than the knobs fell off- and a crystal radio set which seemed like science fiction.------Concerning the moon landing why didnt the lander's 10k pound thrust motors kick up a cloud of dust?-specifically why weren't the landing pads covered in dust? They look spotless Where was the landing crater? a depression?




posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 01:29 AM
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originally posted by: PsychicCroMag
Concerning the moon landing why didnt the lander's 10k pound thrust motors kick up a cloud of dust?-specifically why weren't the landing pads covered in dust? They look spotless Where was the landing crater? a depression?



Which is it? The engine blew all the dust away or there should be dust there?

The fact is that if you watch the 16mm landing video dust is blown up an away by the engine - blown away because there is no atmosphere, so there isn't going to be any around to fall down on to the pads.

The strength you quote for the LM engine is the maximum. Why would you be firing your engine at maximum when you're trying to land? If you're firing an engine hard enough to dig out a massive crater you wouldn't land. The fact is that the ground was disturbed and burnt by the engine, it was commented on during the missions and photographed.



posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 01:54 AM
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a reply to: ProfessorPatternfish

That one is a fake filmed in hangar filled with sand for fake missions, like lunar false flags

Real missions were done with different one



posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 02:00 AM
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originally posted by: PsychicCroMag
Concerning the moon landing why didnt the lander's 10k pound thrust motors kick up a cloud of dust?-specifically why weren't the landing pads covered in dust? They look spotless Where was the landing crater? a depression?


The engine did kick up dust, but since there's no air on the Moon, the dust was just flung outwards and settled back on the surface quickly. The engine was shut off when the probes that extended from the pads touched the ground. There would be no crater since the layer of dust isn't that deep.

pseudoastro.wordpress.com...
space.stackexchange.com...
Link


www.youtube.com...

For some of the Apollo landings, dust did end up on the pads: www.hq.nasa.gov...


edit on 10-4-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 02:07 AM
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a reply to: DentalKing

Where is this hangar?

Who built it?

Who took the sand there?

What sort of sand is it and where is it from?

Who did the filming and photography and lighting?

Where are these people now?

Where is this building now?

How did they get a vacuum and 1/6 gravity?



posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 02:24 AM
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For anyone interested in technical detail, here's a NASA document concerning the LM landing gear, including reports on Apollo 11 landing: www.hq.nasa.gov...



posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 03:43 AM
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and when you've finished being on the moon...



www.youtube.com...
edit on 10/4/2016 by OneBigMonkeyToo because: link



posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 05:19 AM
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a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

And in the video suggestions next to yours - this documentary about the LM: www.youtube.com...



Watching it now.
edit on 10-4-2016 by wildespace because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 09:15 AM
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originally posted by: wildespace
a reply to: OneBigMonkeyToo

And in the video suggestions next to yours - this documentary about the LM: www.youtube.com...

Watching it now.

I like that one because it comes from Grumman. Another great LM documentary is from the "Moon Machines" series. The entire series was very well-done, with each episode concentrating on one piece of the Apollo hardware, and included interviews with the actual engineers and technicians who designed and built them.

Here is the Moon Machines LM episode:


This is another good short video (15 minutes in two parts) about the Apollo 5 test of the LM in 1968. This was the first all-up test of the LM in space, which was unmanned and occurred in Earth orbit:




posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 11:38 AM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People
Here is the Moon Machines LM episode:
That's a good video, thanks.

I noticed at 21 minutes it makes a statement that echoes what the OP said, then follows that up with a statement that echoes your reply to the OP:


To many engineers, the final vehicle was an insult to every notion of what a spacecraft should look like. But, in the vacuum of space, it didn't need to be streamlined.



posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 12:15 PM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur

That's a good video, thanks.

If you liked that, you should watch the rest of the "Moon Machines" series; they are all available on YouTube.

The episodes are as follows:

Part 1: The Saturn V Rocket
Part 2: The Command Module
Part 3: The Navigation Computer
Part 4: The Lunar Module
Part 5: The Space Suit
Part 6: The Lunar Rover

It's very informative, especially due to the first hand information given by the people (engineers and technicians) who were on the front lines of building Apollo.


edit on 4/10/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)

edit on 4/10/2016 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 02:00 PM
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a reply to: reddragon2015

CITATION REQUIRED



posted on Apr, 10 2016 @ 02:02 PM
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a reply to: reddragon2015

incorrect - you are making un-evidenced assertions



posted on Apr, 24 2016 @ 09:46 PM
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originally posted by: Soylent Green Is People

originally posted by: Arbitrageur

That's a good video, thanks.

If you liked that, you should watch the rest of the "Moon Machines" series; they are all available on YouTube.

The episodes are as follows:

Part 1: The Saturn V Rocket
Part 2: The Command Module
Part 3: The Navigation Computer
Part 4: The Lunar Module
Part 5: The Space Suit
Part 6: The Lunar Rover

It's very informative, especially due to the first hand information given by the people (engineers and technicians) who were on the front lines of building Apollo.
That really is an excellent series, thanks for recommending it.

In the space suit episode, I had read the story about the testing problem where the space suit test subject was exposed to vacuum, but as you say they really had first hand information and interviewed the test subject about what it felt like to be exposed to vacuum. He's probably one of the only people alive to experience that (maybe the only person? Unless the Russian have a similar story I don't know about with their space suit testing).

They even had some footage of the incident which I had never seen before, showing him falling over, unconscious. I'm glad he was ok.



posted on Apr, 25 2016 @ 12:53 AM
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originally posted by: Arbitrageur

In the space suit episode, I had read the story about the testing problem where the space suit test subject was exposed to vacuum, but as you say they really had first hand information and interviewed the test subject about what it felt like to be exposed to vacuum. He's probably one of the only people alive to experience that (maybe the only person? Unless the Russian have a similar story I don't know about with their space suit testing).

They even had some footage of the incident which I had never seen before, showing him falling over, unconscious. I'm glad he was ok.


Two employees were received commendations for their actions in this incident - more in the in-house magazine here:

www.jsc.nasa.gov...



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