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Gold/Silver Ratio To Dollar

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posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 09:50 AM
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Debt Clock

Check this out
Look at the very bottom right hand corner

Gold was $28.90 in 1913 now it's $6411.

Also median wages have gone up less than 2K since 2000, housing up 80%.
Seems like modern slavery to me.




posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 09:59 AM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33
Well, that was depressing to look at.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 10:08 AM
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It's far from slavery. The standards of living are enormously higher compared to a century ago. PPP reached a peak after the oil crisis, but that was to be expected. The way I'm able to live my life is much better than it was a decade ago. My options have only increased over time.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 10:11 AM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

You are in the Minority then . The Standard of Living for the Majority of Americans has been Decreasing since 2000 .



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 10:14 AM
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a reply to: Zanti Misfit

I honestly think that depends on how you're measuring it. How many "homeless" people were typing away at free WiFi places on their laptop or smartphone in 2000? Many are being pulled down, but a lot are rising as well.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 10:15 AM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

At that time gold was the same as currency.

If we were still on the gold standard, each dollar we had in hand would buy as much as $320.

The currency would be $.01 dollar bills.

Right now the price of gold is low because it doesn't return a percentage like a financial vehicle would.

However, the percentage on financial vehicles is made of new inflationary money, where as the percentage increase in gold is made of genuine new wealth.

Without inflation, money increases in value over time due to increased productivity and the increase in population (workers, producers and customers).



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 10:22 AM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

Why even talk about gold when we have Trump to worry about?



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 10:24 AM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33



...Also median wages have gone up less than 2K since 2000, housing up 80%.
Seems like modern slavery to me.


 



those wage growth figures are a lot worse off than the government Official record says...
over the last 8 years wages/ take-home pay/ have not grown by $2k...but rather have decreased & the former middle class is in poorer financial shape than before the 2008 great recession and first term of the present oval office occupier


the bureau of labor statistics false facts will completely Shock the next administration and further the outrage of the antics by commander-in-chief #44...



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 10:25 AM
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originally posted by: Blue_Jay33
Gold was $28.90 in 1913 now it's $6411.


That shows the money supply has increased in relation to the amount of gold produced.

The dollar should be linked to a basket of commodities which would limit rampant printing and subsequent debt purchasing with new dollars.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 10:42 AM
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originally posted by: St Udio
a reply to: Blue_Jay33



...Also median wages have gone up less than 2K since 2000, housing up 80%.
Seems like modern slavery to me.


 



those wage growth figures are a lot worse off than the government Official record says...
over the last 8 years wages/ take-home pay/ have not grown by $2k...but rather have decreased & the former middle class is in poorer financial shape than before the 2008 great recession and first term of the present oval office occupier


the bureau of labor statistics false facts will completely Shock the next administration and further the outrage of the antics by commander-in-chief #44...



When they use an average statistic instead of a median statistic the super rich new money getters keep the average moving up. The median statistic would be a better representation of the middle wage.

This can be seen in the housing market. The average house price is usually 50% higher than the median house price.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 10:49 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus

originally posted by: Blue_Jay33
Gold was $28.90 in 1913 now it's $6411.


That shows the money supply has increased in relation to the amount of gold produced.

The dollar should be linked to a basket of commodities which would limit rampant printing and subsequent debt purchasing with new dollars.


Isn't money printing based off the Petro-dollar nowadays? If not then where does it come from?
edit on 3-4-2016 by lostbook because: word add



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 10:54 AM
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originally posted by: lostbook
Isn't money printing based off the Petro-dollar nowadays? If not then where does it come from?


The petrodollar is not an actual currency or commodity, it is a type of capital flow phenomenon.

The Federal Reserve is using Quantitative Easing as a basis for printing more dollars.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 11:03 AM
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a reply to: pl3bscheese

Glad you are doing well, but I am talking about the average person, the middle class seems to be slaving away at lousy service type jobs, as our manufacturing jobs have departed, that chart shows 7 million manufacturing jobs lost since 2000. A lot of those are higher wage union jobs too. Imagine having a wife and 2 kids going from $21/hr Monday to Friday day shift, to $12.50/hr scheduled to work nights until 11pm, weekends, and getting split days off.
Your life went from nice middle class, to poor slave, hard on the family life and relationships.
Not me, but I know many who this has happened too, some are well educated too.
edit on 3-4-2016 by Blue_Jay33 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 11:05 AM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

Interesting how they use 1913 as the base year.

The same year in which the "Federal" "Reserve" and the IRS were created...



edit on 3-4-2016 by gladtobehere because: added image



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 11:27 AM
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a reply to: Semicollegiate




Without inflation, money increases in value over time due to increased productivity and the increase in population (workers, producers and customers).


I could be wrong but money decreases in value as a result of more being printed to keep up with the chasing of goods, hence inflation. The consumption of goods and production do not form a linear graph but production first lags and then speeds up to match demand and then overstocks inventory resulting in layoffs or recession. Inflation will always be around due to Govts wanting to pay their debts with tomorrows cheaper $.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 11:29 AM
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a reply to: lostbook




Why even talk about gold when we have Trump to worry about?


er there's an entry to this thread its called a "thread title". Who asked you to enter the door?



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 11:32 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus




The dollar should be linked to a basket of commodities which would limit rampant printing and subsequent debt purchasing with new dollars.


I'd imagine that the Bureau of Statistics in the US does the same scam for their political masters as they do with the Aust Bureau of Statistics in Australia; they keep pulling and replacing the articles in the " basket " to get the desired "public result"



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus




The Federal Reserve is using Quantitative Easing as a basis for printing more dollars.



not really

www.google.com.au...


Quantitative easing is an unconventional monetary policy in which a central bank purchases government securities or other securities from the market in order to lower interest rates and increase the money supply.


www.investopedia.com...



Quantitative easing is considered when short-term interest rates are at or approaching zero, and does not involve the printing of new banknotes.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 11:41 AM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
not really


Yeah, really:


The era of quantitative easing is over, for now, and in the United States, at least. But the consequences of the Federal Reserve’s policy to pump trillions of dollars into the financial system in hopes of stimulating the economy will long be with us.

Fed policy makers met Wednesday and announced that October would conclude their third round of using dollars created out of thin air to buy vast sums of bonds — $1.7 trillion in just the third round of the program, known across the land (or at least the financial world) as QE3. Source


If you are going to interject yourself into the thread try to get your facts straight.

From your own link too:


Popular media's definition of quantitative easing focuses on the concept of central banks increasing the size of their balance sheets to increase the amount of credit available to borrowers. To make that happen, a central bank issues new money (essentially creating it from nothing) and uses it to purchase assets from other banks






edit on 3-4-2016 by AugustusMasonicus because: Ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 11:42 AM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
I'd imagine that the Bureau of Statistics in the US does the same scam for their political masters as they do with the Aust Bureau of Statistics in Australia; they keep pulling and replacing the articles in the " basket " to get the desired "public result"


Considering the dollar is not linked to any commodities there is nothing to pull or replace.




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