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Gold/Silver Ratio To Dollar

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posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 01:16 PM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

Just to add to your comment which was spot on, even when the manufacturing jobs come back, the building of things like appliances is done by robots and robotic assembly lines. So........those human employed manufacturing jobs are never going to do anything but shrink.

BTW, I don't have an answer for this problem or the lousy paying service jobs either but we've got to believe that this is going to cause something in the way of an economic emergency in the future because who's going to buy the new appliances if they can't afford them? Even Henry Ford saw the necessity of paying his workers enough such that they could buy the product.




posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 01:43 PM
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Who gives a dump about the most exceptional nation ever? Most egomaniacal , warmongering collection of hypocritical agitprop victims ever. Stockholm syndrome at it's perfected form. Enjoy your imminent demise and thanks for exporting your trailer-park democracy to the rest of us unwashed.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 02:24 PM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: lostbook




Why even talk about gold when we have Trump to worry about?


er there's an entry to this thread its called a "thread title". Who asked you to enter the door?


It's a joke......



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: TonyS

Yeah if a factory had 300 workers, automation would pull that down to maybe 75.
I was watching them build cars the other day and the assembly line was 50% robotic and 50% human, frame welding and painting was all done by robots, the doors and glass was installed by workers.

Maybe get a eduction/job repairing robots and maintaining the software, I think that is going to be a growing field.
edit on 3-4-2016 by Blue_Jay33 because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 07:45 PM
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a reply to: TheConstruKctionofLight

While you are right, they used money created for the purchase to purchase it. The banks did not use their own money, it was created for them to use.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 07:50 PM
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all Americans who don't like living here are more than welcome to leave, don't let the door hit you on the way out. I'll stay here, and suffer through.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 09:51 PM
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originally posted by: TheConstruKctionofLight
a reply to: Semicollegiate




Without inflation, money increases in value over time due to increased productivity and the increase in population (workers, producers and customers).


I could be wrong but money decreases in value as a result of more being printed to keep up with the chasing of goods, hence inflation. The consumption of goods and production do not form a linear graph but production first lags and then speeds up to match demand and then overstocks inventory resulting in layoffs or recession. Inflation will always be around due to Govts wanting to pay their debts with tomorrows cheaper $.


That sounds like the real situation.

Another thing to consider is that there is no way to tax the increase in buying power due to deflation. As the dollar buys more per generation the tax rate would actually go down relative to buying power.

The way it is now, every increase in buying power has an increase in taxes paid. In other words, when your wages go up your taxes go up. If your wages stayed the same but bought more every year, your relative tax rate would decrease over the years.



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 10:13 PM
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originally posted by: TonyS
a reply to: Blue_Jay33

Just to add to your comment which was spot on, even when the manufacturing jobs come back, the building of things like appliances is done by robots and robotic assembly lines. So........those human employed manufacturing jobs are never going to do anything but shrink.

BTW, I don't have an answer for this problem or the lousy paying service jobs either but we've got to believe that this is going to cause something in the way of an economic emergency in the future because who's going to buy the new appliances if they can't afford them? Even Henry Ford saw the necessity of paying his workers enough such that they could buy the product.


The career service sector is getting about the same pay as manufacturing jobs now.


Bigger Image

And production has gone up, according to the "Industrial Production Index".


Bigger Image

The IPI might be as skewed as the CPI. It is in terms of value added. Probably has at least a grain of truth.


Nevertheless, the demagogues still argue that, even though high-paying service sector jobs have more than replaced lost factory jobs, “we don’t make things here anymore” and we should lament this. This oft-heard refrain is patently false. We don’t make certain things, such as garments, toys or electronics, because global free trade and technological advances tend to shift America’s output into those industries in which our comparative advantage is greatest. But Americans do indeed make things — quite valuable things.

This can be seen in Figure 2, which shows the US Industrial Production Index for the “de-industrialization” period. After the expected steep decline following the Great Recession of 2008–2009, US manufacturing has slowly bounced back and is now producing more products, in value-added terms, than ever before. Indeed, this index, which consists mainly of manufacturing, has grown by over 100 percent since the 1979 peak in manufacturing employment.
mises.org...


When production of all the necessities are covered by cheap production, then the economy can make high value stuff like rocket packs, personal robot butlers, portable hydroponics, home based vitamin and hormone replicators and what not.
edit on 3-4-2016 by Semicollegiate because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 3 2016 @ 10:18 PM
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a reply to: Blue_Jay33

You know a lot of farming jobs were lost after the industrial revolution. People feared a lot of things over that. Jobs were also created. We've created 2 million service & tech jobs in the time span of losing 7 million manufacturing jobs. Not the same shift, but I think it's a progress waiting to be.

There will come a point where work is optional for the majority. Either we make that a reality or deal with the consequences of having so many unemployable.



posted on Apr, 4 2016 @ 05:15 AM
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a reply to: Semicollegiate

That's interesting, but.......I look at that list of service jobs and practically every category requires a degree or a professional license of one type or another, doesn't it? The factory jobs lost were largely jobs requiring nothing more than a high school diploma and/or some were semi-skilled such as machinist. Many were in the garment industry, i.e. seamstress.

Problem today is that unless a person is a genius who can get scholarships, or has rich parents, they can't afford the college degree. So for example, the best the average kid whose father is an electrician can expect is to do is to maybe follow on as an electrician, but the kid can't ever expect to be able to afford a college degree.




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