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Florida Company Developing Device to Track Stolen Guns

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posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 09:02 PM
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A Clearwater business is developing a way to alert gun owners the moment their weapons are on the move and help them track them back down.

TracFind is developing a small GPS device that can be attached to guns. The device, which combines GPS tracking technology with smartphone signals, can track in real time a stolen or lost weapon to within three feet. An added feature notifies the gun owner immediately if the secured gun moves as much as an inch.

Some gun owners dislike the gun locks and other devices that they believe may impede the use of the gun should the owner need it in a self-defense situation. This doesn’t do that, TracFind officials say, and that’s a big selling point.

“Most gun owners won’t use ‘smart gun’ technology due to the possibility that it may interfere with the gun’s function when needed, so we designed TracFind with that in mind,” said Clark East, the company’s founder and CEO, who plans to market the device later this year.

TracFind resembles a small key fob and can be attached to a wide variety of items, though its placement on guns — and the software that alerts owners immediately if it is moved — may be the groundbreaking aspect that sets it apart from other trackers, said Ron Laker, the company’s president of business development.

Read more at The Tampa Tribune


I thing the integrated tracker built into the handle has merit. The key fob is pointless on a handgun as anyone could simply tear it off the moment they see it. Now on a rifle it could likely be hidden inside the handle or stock. Mind you this device itself is similar to any GPS tracker you can order from China for as low as $1 dollar on wish.com . Those cheaper trackers function like lo-jack that you react to upon realizing you may have lost your property. These same trackers can also be used for any property you own.

This tracker being developed by TracFind is improved because the app WILL ALERT you the moment your property goes on the move. Traditionally some things you may not know have gone missing if you don't use or see them everyday and the thief is moderately skilled. So who knows what happens during that time frame. Now if you are at work or school, you will know your property is on the move with a immediate alert, and option to notify police.

I like it. Alot more expensive though than simple trackers. I think this device has merit in certain firearms and other personal property. Probably would not be too much of a game changer though in regards to firearms.




posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 09:09 PM
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a reply to: AmericanRealist

I would only like this if it could not be remotely activated by anyone except the owner.



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 09:11 PM
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I'll have to call a few friends as a heads up.

Thanks op



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 09:19 PM
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How would they notify the police for you?



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 09:36 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Its part of the app after you have been told it is on the move.


An added feature notifies the gun owner immediately if the secured gun moves as much as an inch.

Another exclusive feature of TracFind allows gun owners, at their discretion, to link local police to the tracking data, complete with an item description and photo so police can track and recover the weapon, possibly within minutes of the theft.

The device sends a text message to the owner if the gun is moved and sends a signal in real time showing the gun’s location, Laker said.


That would be entirely at your discretion of course. I like the common sense our PD added with their opinion as well.


Tampa police said the added level of security helps, but there’s no substitute for safely stowing guns in the first place.

“Without knowing the specifics of this product, in general we are for anything that will keep guns from being stolen, aid in an investigation and/or a product that will help locate a firearm after it has been stolen,” said police spokeswoman Andrea Davis. “But it is very important to emphasize that any type of technology on the market should not take the place of legal gun owners safely securing their firearms.

“Anything that relies on technology,” she said, “can be defeated.”


Makes sense to me.



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 09:38 PM
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a reply to: AmericanRealist

Police rarely respond to security alarms at residential homes, so I'd like to see how that pans out.



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 09:46 PM
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a reply to: AugustusMasonicus

Well, I am certain they do not intend to share every registered product attached to property and linked to an app made available to a public database anyone can search. But if you are worried whether or not the big guys in the fusion centers can track your weapon, well you already know they would have that capability as much as they can simply find where your phone is and use it to spy on you. Unless you are already a target though, I doubt anyone will be doing that in the Fed.

However, this could be part of a subtle discreet digital gun registry that can use GPS to track and confiscate firearms when the NWO makes their move. That would be a helluva conspiracy, and if Hillary were elected POTUS , I am certain she would work tirelessly to get right on it.



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 09:52 PM
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a reply to: Atsbhct

Well residential security alarms, as well as commercial typically notify a private company, who then notifies the police, unless you pay top dollar or it is for a weapons/bank outfit. Hopefully this is not the case in your municipality, but I know in my city, the police are top notch and respond VERY quickly. We host here in this city a regional ATF ad FBI field offices. Trust me when I tell you, stolen firearms and recovering them promptly is always on the top of their list. I would like to hope it is the same for yours.



posted on Mar, 6 2016 @ 10:23 PM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: AmericanRealist

I would only like this if it could not be remotely activated by anyone except the owner.



Ah, just think of it.... a Google Map with all the little flashing lights showing you which houses and locations all the guns are.

Then, make it mandatory by law.

I can see that happening.
edit on 6-3-2016 by infolurker because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 12:56 AM
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originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: AmericanRealist

Police rarely respond to security alarms at residential homes, so I'd like to see how that pans out.


I worked as a dispatcher, for both a local police department, and the county sherifs office for some time and can tell you that in colorado you statement is completely false. The policies in place made it mandatory that LEO'S respond to all alarms in a timely manner. They responded to every alarm immediately.



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 01:36 AM
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a reply to: jackjoedoe

Have to agree - I live out in the county and SO has shown up every time my alarm has gone off. The alarm co finally got the system working right.



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 03:27 AM
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originally posted by: jackjoedoe

originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: AmericanRealist

Police rarely respond to security alarms at residential homes, so I'd like to see how that pans out.


I worked as a dispatcher, for both a local police department, and the county sherifs office for some time and can tell you that in colorado you statement is completely false. The policies in place made it mandatory that LEO'S respond to all alarms in a timely manner. They responded to every alarm immediately.

Much to the dismay of LEO since it's so often a false alarm.



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 04:11 AM
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originally posted by: AugustusMasonicus
a reply to: AmericanRealist

I would only like this if it could not be remotely activated by anyone except the owner.


And one would have to wonder about a government 'backdoor', like they have in cell phones and computers.



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 04:15 AM
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originally posted by: OccamsRazor04

originally posted by: jackjoedoe

originally posted by: Atsbhct
a reply to: AmericanRealist

Police rarely respond to security alarms at residential homes, so I'd like to see how that pans out.


I worked as a dispatcher, for both a local police department, and the county sherifs office for some time and can tell you that in colorado you statement is completely false. The policies in place made it mandatory that LEO'S respond to all alarms in a timely manner. They responded to every alarm immediately.

Much to the dismay of LEO since it's so often a false alarm.

Correct.
I had a law enforcement officer threaten to fine the company that I work for because of repeated false alarms on the security system.... the security system with the alarm problem was our adjoining neighbor.



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 04:53 AM
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a reply to: infolurker

So, too, can I.

I hate the idea of backdoor's into anything.



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 06:31 AM
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originally posted by: AmericanRealist


TracFind is developing a small GPS device that can be attached to guns. The device, which combines GPS tracking technology with smartphone signals, can track in real time a stolen or lost weapon to within three feet. An added feature notifies the gun owner immediately if the secured gun moves as much as an inch.




So the GPS device will pick up (i) enough satellites to secure a GPS lock, and (ii) a signal to the nearest mobile/cellphone tower... while locked in a steel box (that essentially acts as an impromptu Faraday cage ) in the middle of my house.

The idea certainly has merit, don't get me wrong, but they might be over-egging the pudding a bit on this one. Not that I would ever buy one because I dislike broadcasting that sort of information to the world.



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 07:41 AM
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a reply to: OccamsRazor04




Much to the dismay of LEO since it's so often a false alarm.


And in some places a fee is charged for having too many false alarms.

www.seattle.gov...

www.phoenix.gov...



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 02:34 PM
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A neat device- right up until it becomes mandatory to install in every firearm via federal law- and the nsa would have a backdoor.

Don't think they won't try it.



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 03:37 PM
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a reply to: lordcomac

These devices have already existed for years, and work for any property you can drop them. The innovation here is the app and its ability to report to you in real time if your property moves so much as an inch when it should be still in a secure location.



posted on Mar, 7 2016 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: AmericanRealist

Lots of exploit possibilities with this. Than again many devices are already vulnerable to such exploits.

I wonder how long before it becomes mandatory?
edit on 52331America/ChicagoMon, 07 Mar 2016 15:52:52 -0600000000p3142 by interupt42 because: (no reason given)



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