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Apple Said Killer iphone Password was changed 24 hours after FBI took it

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posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 05:25 AM
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Apparently during the hours after the attack "they" tried to unlock the phone getting the password wrong so many times causing it to factory reset.
Once it has been reset the data is lost as it cannot be backed up to icloud.

I can't understand why these people would think they could gain access to an encrypted device. They know the protocol for it and know fine rightly what would happen.

This points to a blatant cover up in an effort to destroy evidence. The person who did this should be held accountable.

Remember you can't fart without filling out some kind of forms in the police/security services.




posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 05:39 AM
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Lets boycott Apple, those damn bastards!



Sent from my MacBook Pro.



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 07:23 AM
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a reply to: InMyShell

I don't think it is about the data at all. Does anyone else find it odd that this has come up this long after the attack? It is definitely about being able to get into anyone's device and monitor all. Remember the words of Benjamin Franklin ,"Those who would give up essential Liberty, to purchase a little temporary Safety, deserve neither Liberty nor Safety"



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 09:05 AM
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originally posted by: Praetorius

originally posted by: Lurker1
Do you people seriously believe anything is safe or private?

Not as much as should be, but yes. At least if you're willing to invest in ensuring as much.


I'm sorry for you.

The government is like God. It's everywhere. You're just in denial.



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 09:36 AM
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The SB event was staged, and as reported by at least 2 different witnesses, the shooters were athletic while males in military garb, NOT a man and his 90 pound wife.

Therefore, the whole phone issue is part of that subterfuge by the government. They simply want to make it so that encrypted communications between citizens becomes impossible.



posted on Feb, 20 2016 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: Salander

Do you have any idea how ridiculous that sounds?



posted on Feb, 21 2016 @ 01:55 AM
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This is important for not only the future of this case, but the people and consumer technology. It very well may be that this could also be used as a political platform in order to get developers to create a back door in case of situations like these.

Its one of the reasons I'd never get Win10. There's always a way to close back doors though.

Problem with that is, for Apple products, the back door(s) will be harder to close since the knowledge of Apple coding , nor the system is not nearly as common as Windows.

2016 is an interesting year. Seems like its building up to something huge for 2017-2020



posted on Feb, 21 2016 @ 10:11 AM
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originally posted by: Salander
The SB event was staged, and as reported by at least 2 different witnesses, the shooters were athletic while males in military garb, NOT a man and his 90 pound wife.

Therefore, the whole phone issue is part of that subterfuge by the government. They simply want to make it so that encrypted communications between citizens becomes impossible.


Bring one of those alleged witnesses on ATS to provide further details.... Otherwise this comment is more suited for Skunk works. Sorry....



posted on Feb, 21 2016 @ 11:44 AM
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Didn't the male terrorist work for the City or County? Wasn't the phone provided by his employer? If so why are the Feds not approaching the employer for the password? We have a family plan and only the person who holds the account is allowed to make changes to passwords, etc. Why make a big deal out of contacting Apple when it would be simple enough to approach the contract holder of the cell phone?



posted on Feb, 22 2016 @ 08:11 AM
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a reply to: Lurker1

Yes, I do. In a time of universal deception, speaking the truth is a radical act. It doesn't matter whether people saw 3 armed and athletic males doing the shooting. All that matters is the story told the media by the authorities. That is the reality constructed for us, and by golly, we believe it, facts be damned.



posted on Feb, 22 2016 @ 11:24 PM
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The entire thing is weird and fishy. iDevices will automatically back up to the cloud if connected to a power source, and connected to Wi-Fi. So.. yea, just could have left it connected to their Wi-Fi, and it would have backed up.. no passwords required.

There is an additional lock that simply can't be undone.. the Find my Phone feature. We've had to simply dump many phones because of termed employees having that feature on, and not having their passcode. There is no reset if that is the case.. you are just out of luck.

I find it hard to believe any law enforcement would be so stupid as to try over and over... trying to "guess" a password to an iPhone, until it failed to the point of deleting data. And the option is to delete all data over 10 failed attempts, and you have to turn it on (which the owner may have). How stupid could they have been?

Something just doesn't add up.



posted on Feb, 22 2016 @ 11:34 PM
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If you have nothing to hide, then why demand internet privacy? Internet privacy is not a right imo.
edit on 22-2-2016 by Mousygretchen because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 22 2016 @ 11:48 PM
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originally posted by: fleabit
The entire thing is weird and fishy. iDevices will automatically back up to the cloud if connected to a power source, and connected to Wi-Fi. So.. yea, just could have left it connected to their Wi-Fi, and it would have backed up.. no passwords required.

There is an additional lock that simply can't be undone.. the Find my Phone feature. We've had to simply dump many phones because of termed employees having that feature on, and not having their passcode. There is no reset if that is the case.. you are just out of luck.

I find it hard to believe any law enforcement would be so stupid as to try over and over... trying to "guess" a password to an iPhone, until it failed to the point of deleting data. And the option is to delete all data over 10 failed attempts, and you have to turn it on (which the owner may have). How stupid could they have been?

Something just doesn't add up.


I figure there is two possibilities here someone went in to apple account and deleted everything before FBI could see cloud data. Or this is a rouse the I phone had already been hacked and they don't want certain people to know they are on to them just yet. The third is unlikely and that is that the phone no longer connected to with with fi at the residence meaning for example the mom lived their changed the password etc. But that seems to me would implicate her directly and would be a bone head move.



posted on Feb, 23 2016 @ 03:44 PM
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a reply to: reddragon2015
At least this particular issue I don't have to worry about. Don't have an iPhone now or ever. Don't have and have never had "any" brand of smart phone. Don't want one. I am perfectly satisfied with my old dumb Samsung SGH A-707 flippophone.



posted on Feb, 23 2016 @ 04:05 PM
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Not sure where folks have gotten the impression the data on the phone has been erased. I haven’t read that anywhere.

Federal prosecutors said they were not asking for a master key for all Apple phones, but rather software to unlock this particular phone. It said Apple can hack the phone at it’s own facilities, keep the software and destroy it after it was used. All the FBI is requesting is the data on the phone (Contact List, text messages, incoming/outgoing calls, videos, images, etc.) Apple has said that if it creates that software, it would be "relentlessly attacked by hackers and cybercriminals" looking to steal the software and that the best way to ensure it does not end up in the wrong hands is to never create it.

What a crock on Apple’s part. That’s the most lame excuse I’ve ever heard. Look, I’m all for privacy, but as with everything else in life there are exceptions. Privacy is not a black & white issue. In this case I think an exception should be made. For cryin’ out loud, this is a blatant case of terrorism within our own borders. And I don’t buy for a second that Apple can’t gain access to this phone without jeopardizing the security of all other iPhones.

Apple says they’re afraid of setting a precedent. So does that mean that Apple will refuse to help govt authorities gain access to individual phones in cases involving terrorism in the future? What kind of precedent is that to set?

So, I guess if I’m a terrorist, then Apple is my friend. All I have to do is periodically destroy my iPhone and get a new one, and then when an attack is drawing near I just turn off the iCloud auto-backup feature, change my iCloud password and not do any manual backups to the iCloud server.

Meanwhile Apple, Google, Amazon, Microsoft, and all the other tech giants are working diligently on development of IoT (Internet of Things) where they will be collecting unprecedented amounts of personal data on EVERYONE and analyzing your personal habits, preferences and lifestyle extensively. But, I guess that’s OK...

Go figure...



posted on Feb, 23 2016 @ 04:31 PM
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originally posted by: paraphi
They want:

1. Apple to change the config so the phone does not erase itself following failed password attempts. Just for this phone.
2. A process to automate the process to run the 100,000 combinations, thus saving time. The FBI say Apple can do this If they like.


Doesn't make any sense to me...why wouldn't they just:

1. If they even had to, they could crack open the phone, get access to the aux memory(an internal flash chip?). Also get any hardware IDs etc they need from the inside of the phone. Get the chip(s) and create whatever disk images of it/them that they need i.e. just take the chips off the board and put them on a different board...heck it's the government so they could even have one made just for doing this if they needed to for some reason. They probably don't even have to crack open the phone and do all that just to clone the phone's drive(s)...maybe to get some hardware ids if they need them...

2. Make a zillion copies of the disk image and run that disk image it in a zillion iPhone emulators on a supercomputer. Apple already has perfect iPhone emulators it uses as part of developing iOS and iOS applications.

3. They can has cracked.
edit on 23-2-2016 by 11andrew34 because: clarification

edit on 23-2-2016 by 11andrew34 because: punctuation



posted on Feb, 23 2016 @ 07:15 PM
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Yea I noticed that in the terms of service not only Iphones make you agree to but EVEN ANDROID does as I bought a phone just yesterday and one six months ago and until I agreed, the phones were useless. You cant download even one app without going through a Gmail account in the playstore (unless you know how to get apps on the net, I don't). And since I don't want people in my business I deleted cloud, google plus and photos and such from my last phone just to see everything pop up online as I checking out my new phone and I looked it up APPLE SAYS- SIMPLY DELETING CLOUD GOOGLE AND PHOTOS FROM YOUR ANDROID DOESN'T CHANGE THE FACT GOOGLE COPIES EACH OF YOUR PICTURES AS WELL AS A LOG OF WHERE U GO AND WHAT YOU DO EVEN IF YOU DELETE OR DISABLE GOOGLE PLUS. So basically iPhone or android you cant even clear everything off your phone and run a third party internet search engine, third party picture album, abstain from Facebook and google plus, etc. Everything you do is logged and kept somewhere for google and copies of any file you create go there too, again even if you disable and delete cloud, drive, and the likes. Look it up, theyre totally up front about it. But honestly you cant even operate a phone anymore other than an alphanumeric keypad simple flip telephone WITHOUT google having a record of your every move (and since you must allow access to your cam and mic I sure they get such personal and intimate information we have no excuse NOT to be outside Pennsylvania Avenue right now with pitchforks and torches.
edit on 2/23/2016 by AlexandrosTheGreat because:



posted on Feb, 24 2016 @ 09:24 AM
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The phone in question is a Govt phone. It was issued to the terrorist as part of his city duties. The city could have gotten all of the information off the phone if they had activated all of the devises features before they issued it to him. They did not do this but they had access to the password. They probably gave the password to the FBI and the FBI changed it. ca reply to: Daughter2



posted on Feb, 25 2016 @ 09:01 AM
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a reply to: Bob350

I suspect you are right about that, it being a government phone.

Instead of dealing with Apple in a private manner, the FBI has chosen to hold this very public spectacle. I suspect an ulterior motive by the feds.



posted on Feb, 28 2016 @ 03:30 PM
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originally posted by: Lurker1

originally posted by: Praetorius

originally posted by: Lurker1
Do you people seriously believe anything is safe or private?

Not as much as should be, but yes. At least if you're willing to invest in ensuring as much.


I'm sorry for you.

The government is like God. It's everywhere. You're just in denial.

Oh, I disagree. I absolutely believe the government would LIKE to have access to all the data with no locked doors in their way - but I also believe we do still have some safe havens, if we're willing to put the time and effort into learning or using them. I've yet to see any evidence of NSA breaching properly-applied PGP, AES, and other encryption methods. I rather pity you instead if you think otherwise and that their is no privacy at all anymore - I know how to take steps to feel secure (and so far the proof is in what little pudding I've made), although I thankfully also have the small benefit of not being a likely target for such powerful adversaries.

Take care.



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