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With 'Off-Planet' Mining Bill, US Congress Seeks to Privatize Outer Space

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posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 11:50 AM
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a reply to: FyreByrd
The problem is, as was pointed out, the treaty on space. In short, it is not open to be owned by anyone. The moment that a company or country lays claim to anything in space, it would cause all sorts of problems legally that no one can anticipate. And here is how one would look at such:

Lets say for example, a company sets up shop on the moon mining metals on it. If they lay claim, than another country or person could tie such up in court by stating that they own such, and it would be a legal nightmare. The same would go for anything in space. Countries would have a vested interest in such.

So any claiming would not only need those who signed the treaty, but also international cooperation to honor such.




posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 11:51 AM
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originally posted by: KawRider9

Masonic moon miners?


I like it but we might get sued by the original 3M (Minnesota Mining and Manufacturing).



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 11:52 AM
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originally posted by: Lysergic

I'll send a post card from the crab nebula... I seek the crab people. I bring butter.


The Department of Fish and Wildlife said you cannot eat them completely but can only rip off only one claw and throw them back.



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 11:53 AM
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originally posted by: projectvxn
Please stop complaining about this.

Space mining is exactly how the human race is going to be able to colonize space and expand its exploration capabilities. There is no other way. Mining asteroids and other planetary bodies within our solar system makes sense. We simply do not have all the resources available here, and even if we did, the cost and magnitude of trying to supply our expansion into the solar system from Earth would be insurmountable.


Sad but true. It seems that there will never be any true interest in true Space exploration until there is financial benefit for the few. Once this bill gets signed, I expect to see an urgency to expand into Space not seen since the Space race of the 50's and 60's. The only difference is that there will be a whole lot more countries involved than just the US and Russia.
edit on 13-11-2015 by lostbook because: word add



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:02 PM
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originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: projectvxn
Please stop complaining about this.

Space mining is exactly how the human race is going to be able to colonize space and expand its exploration capabilities. There is no other way. Mining asteroids and other planetary bodies within our solar system makes sense. We simply do not have all the resources available here, and even if we did, the cost and magnitude of trying to supply our expansion into the solar system from Earth would be insurmountable.


Sad but true. It seems that there will never be any true interest in true Space exploration until there is financial benefit for the few. Once this bill gets signed, I expect to see an urgency to expand into Space not seen since the Space race of the 50's and 60's.


The benefits should be a side-effect of the exploration. Think of all the innovations that came from the publicly funded Moon Landings, the non-manned explorer missions and the early Shuttle missions.

The shuttle started to fail as a program when, much like the Post Office, republican administrations began cutting back on funding. I recently saw a BBC docudrama on the Challenger Explosion hearings (I think on Amazon) with William Hurt as Richard Fynman (don't know the spelling) that points out the 'profit' need as a direct cause of the accident.

Space Exploration as pure science is important. Pure science, publically funded is important.

This isn't that.



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:12 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd


Well I suppose all the 'refining' and 'maufacturing' would have to be 'on-asteroid' as well - workforce? Maybe Mr. Trumps 'Illegals'?? Solar radiation anyone?

I'm not aware of any refineries that use solar here. Not enough power.

Its not just a heating operation, the ore has to be 'mined', transported to the crusher, smelted in the presence of flux and refined into ingots, prior to actually manufacturing anything… you don;t just shoot a laser at rock and out comes a rock hammer.

In "space" these operations become even more problematic, especially in lo Gravity environments, especially if you have to manufacture everything first before mining can even begin.

You're talking very expensive to orbit, to asteroid, to land, to build environs just to live, just to begin work.

People aren't thinking this through very much, they just want others to support whatever next space venture is out there, the more they get you enthused the more money they'll get from public coffers to undertake it.

Hey daddy got bucks, we know where is this gold lump in space and we'll fix a rocket to it if you just fund our little enterprise, waddasay?


edit on 13-11-2015 by intrptr because: spelling, change



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:12 PM
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originally posted by: FyreByrd

originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: projectvxn
Please stop complaining about this.

Space mining is exactly how the human race is going to be able to colonize space and expand its exploration capabilities. There is no other way. Mining asteroids and other planetary bodies within our solar system makes sense. We simply do not have all the resources available here, and even if we did, the cost and magnitude of trying to supply our expansion into the solar system from Earth would be insurmountable.


Sad but true. It seems that there will never be any true interest in true Space exploration until there is financial benefit for the few. Once this bill gets signed, I expect to see an urgency to expand into Space not seen since the Space race of the 50's and 60's.


The benefits should be a side-effect of the exploration. Think of all the innovations that came from the publicly funded Moon Landings, the non-manned explorer missions and the early Shuttle missions.

The shuttle started to fail as a program when, much like the Post Office, republican administrations began cutting back on funding. I recently saw a BBC docudrama on the Challenger Explosion hearings (I think on Amazon) with William Hurt as Richard Fynman (don't know the spelling) that points out the 'profit' need as a direct cause of the accident.

Space Exploration as pure science is important. Pure science, publically funded is important.

This isn't that.


Agreed. However, the sad truth is that Congress has been bought by private individuals/ corporations and these people want to explore Space as a financial venture.



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:13 PM
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I don't trust business to not bring back something that endangers the planet.

The greed level on Earth is too high to let it loose on space. It should be a planet Earth undertaking, not Joe Smoe Corporation.

An out of this world dibs on that event.



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:13 PM
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See, the US government isn't happy controlling the planet now they want to control the universe



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:18 PM
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originally posted by: FyreByrd

originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: projectvxn
Please stop complaining about this.

Space mining is exactly how the human race is going to be able to colonize space and expand its exploration capabilities. There is no other way. Mining asteroids and other planetary bodies within our solar system makes sense. We simply do not have all the resources available here, and even if we did, the cost and magnitude of trying to supply our expansion into the solar system from Earth would be insurmountable.


Sad but true. It seems that there will never be any true interest in true Space exploration until there is financial benefit for the few. Once this bill gets signed, I expect to see an urgency to expand into Space not seen since the Space race of the 50's and 60's.


The benefits should be a side-effect of the exploration. Think of all the innovations that came from the publicly funded Moon Landings, the non-manned explorer missions and the early Shuttle missions.

The shuttle started to fail as a program when, much like the Post Office, republican administrations began cutting back on funding. I recently saw a BBC docudrama on the Challenger Explosion hearings (I think on Amazon) with William Hurt as Richard Fynman (don't know the spelling) that points out the 'profit' need as a direct cause of the accident.

Space Exploration as pure science is important. Pure science, publically funded is important.

This isn't that.


We benefit from spin-off tech developed by NASA everyday. Its unfortunate that most people don't seem to realize this. I agree that there should be a strictly scientific exploration, but until Congress gets overhauled or some other country takes the lead in Space exploration who has more noble aspirations, it's just a pipe dream.



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:19 PM
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originally posted by: Autorico
I'm in favor of damn near anything that gets us into space and exploring.


Me, too. Sensors and probes wise.

Paying, manned operations are currently too (costly).
edit on 13-11-2015 by intrptr because: ()



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:21 PM
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US Government: "sorry alien race, that's my asteroid, and non-earth planet, and mineral rock belt - see, it says so right here on this piece of paper"

Alien race: "OMG - pew pew pew"

US Government: "or that"

LOL - the US government needs to learn how to deny ignorance.



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:22 PM
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Subcommittee on Space, Science and Competitiveness - Chair Ted Cruz

What could go wrong, policy wise?



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:27 PM
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originally posted by: intrptr

originally posted by: AmericanRealist
You know, I would like to own shares in an asteroid mining company. The growth potential is infinite and cost effectiveness will make the process more profitable year over year.
I am for interstellar mining and shall cast my votes accordingly!

Oh yah, how do you guarantee the safe return of large amounts of asteroid ore to earth, without crashing into something more precious than precious metal?


Crash it into the moon. We'll figure out how to get it back from the Moon at a later date.



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:29 PM
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a reply to: olaru12

Gotta LAND there first...I'm starting a lunar security company...



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:33 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

I think its a good idea.

I would not worry as far as the Americans exceptionlism is concerned. It wont likely be US rockets reaching those resources.

The why Skylon is shapeing up I would would be more worried at the UK holding the keys to orbit for the civilian sector.



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:36 PM
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originally posted by: FyreByrd

originally posted by: lostbook

originally posted by: projectvxn
Please stop complaining about this.

Space mining is exactly how the human race is going to be able to colonize space and expand its exploration capabilities. There is no other way. Mining asteroids and other planetary bodies within our solar system makes sense. We simply do not have all the resources available here, and even if we did, the cost and magnitude of trying to supply our expansion into the solar system from Earth would be insurmountable.


Sad but true. It seems that there will never be any true interest in true Space exploration until there is financial benefit for the few. Once this bill gets signed, I expect to see an urgency to expand into Space not seen since the Space race of the 50's and 60's.


The benefits should be a side-effect of the exploration. Think of all the innovations that came from the publicly funded Moon Landings, the non-manned explorer missions and the early Shuttle missions.

The shuttle started to fail as a program when, much like the Post Office, republican administrations began cutting back on funding. I recently saw a BBC docudrama on the Challenger Explosion hearings (I think on Amazon) with William Hurt as Richard Fynman (don't know the spelling) that points out the 'profit' need as a direct cause of the accident.

Space Exploration as pure science is important. Pure science, publically funded is important.

This isn't that.


Life isnt startrek get over it!



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:42 PM
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a reply to: FyreByrd

Oh gee, well that used to be Mars but it's been renamed Verizon.



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:54 PM
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originally posted by: Bluntone22
a reply to: VoidHawk


I don't think you are considering how far out there is. That's one hell of a lot of nothing between here and there.

Not far to mars


I know there's a lot of problems to be solved, but we've got to start building Star Trek type ships. We've got to be capable of space travel, because until then, this planet is a prison.



posted on Nov, 13 2015 @ 12:56 PM
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Will ore processing be cheaper in space?







 
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