It looks like you're using an Ad Blocker.

Please white-list or disable AboveTopSecret.com in your ad-blocking tool.

Thank you.

 

Some features of ATS will be disabled while you continue to use an ad-blocker.

 

The Trijicon Ruggedized Miniature Reflex Sight: The Future of Handgun Sighting Systems

page: 1
10
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join
share:

posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 05:38 PM
link   
I've been evaluating the Trijicon RMR for the better part of a month on my Glock 19 Gen 4. It is my opinion that these types of sighting systems are the future of handguns for various reasons:

1. The Weapon

Glock 19 Generation 4. Slide milled to accept RMR mounting.


2. The Sight

Trijicon RMR RM05, 9 MOA Amber Dot Reflex Sight.



This sight requires no batteries. It is a combination ambient light gathering fiber optic and tritium gas.

On to the Glock 19 Gen 4. The evaluation was not of the pistol. I've put 1000 or so flawless rounds through it. It is a reliable carry pistol and it is incredibly accurate when you can wring it out using the proper equipment.

The month long training period was focused entirely on the RMR. I took it out to 20 yards. I used speed shooting techniques as well as speed draw. There were a few errant rounds on the target due to momentary lapses in trigger discipline. Otherwise what you see is 150 rounds on target at 20 yards.



This is near rifle accuracy being squeezed out of a pistol with a 4 inch barrel. 3 dot sight, the U and Dot of the stock Glock sights, or post and dot night sights cannot compare to this kind of accuracy at all.

Why? Because I can use BOTH of my eyes to track, acquire, and hit the target. There's no sight alignment required. Where the dot is pointed is where the bullet will hit.

There is a learning curve, however. Because of the design of the system, with a curved window, acquiring the dot can be problematic at first. That is why it is important to train with it. The image above, at 20 yards, using the techniques described above, are the result of consistent training with the sight system.

You can find these from $300 to $600 depending on model, whether it was used or not, or whether it is on sale or not. I found a used one for $280 on Ebay. Services who offer slide milling for the RMR are plentiful on the internet and can be expensive depending on the additional services you request.

Ladies and Gentlemen these sights, and some like it(Leupold Delta Point, Burris Fast Fire, and a few others) are the future of handgun sighting. Notch and post and 3 dot are a thing of the past and should be treated as such. The results speak for themselves.

edit on -06:00Sun, 01 Nov 2015 12:04:15 -060020151America/Chicago2015-11-01T12:04:15-06:0030vx11 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:11 PM
link   
Not gonna lie, at first glance I thought your knife was mounted in some sort of weird bayonet configuration.

Now I just feel let down that it's not



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:12 PM
link   
a reply to: projectvxn

I see absolutely no advantage over a laser.
Try having cover behind a post or barrel and looking at the target from one side and shooting from around the other side.
Laser are really good at night too.
No contest.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:15 PM
link   
a reply to: Shamrock6

I will be reviewing that folder.

It is innovative, sharp as hell, and extremely tough.

It is the Cold Steel Pocket Bushman.

I love this knife so much I was thinking about giving it a name as if it were a sword.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:16 PM
link   
a reply to: Aliensun

Most lasers can't handle repeated recoil forces.

Also they, like tracers, work both ways.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:19 PM
link   

originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: projectvxn

I see absolutely no advantage over a laser.
Try having cover behind a post or barrel and looking at the target from one side and shooting from around the other side.
Laser are really good at night too.
No contest.


Why on earth would you ever stick your head out one side of cover and your weapon out the other side and start shooting? The hell kind of technique is that?



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:20 PM
link   
a reply to: Shamrock6

It's probably some tacticool "technique" taught at "tactical pistol courses" by a self-described "operator."



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:20 PM
link   
a reply to: projectvxn

I'd be interested in that review. Always on the lookout for a good foldup. Look forward to it.

Also, on topic, have you tried carrying the Glock in a holster? If so, drawbacks? If not, do you plan to?



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:23 PM
link   
a reply to: Shamrock6

I carry it everywhere I go and it conceals well.

The only time I can't carry that weapon is when I'm on duty.

I had to modify my IWB holster slightly to accommodate the sight.

Otherwise it does not hinder carry at all.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:25 PM
link   
a reply to: projectvxn

Interesting. I never carry IWB so I'm curious as to what the profile would be on it in a duty holster. I've been looking to get a sight attached so this is definitely some food for thought.

Thanks, vix.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:41 PM
link   
a reply to: projectvxn

Looks like a great sight, I've got a fast fire on top of a Burris mtac scope for my ar . I've been wanting to put one on my Glock 21. I would like to get away from batteries though, this looks like the best option. I've got a set of snake eyes on my 21, their a big improvement over stock.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:44 PM
link   
a reply to: slednecktx

To get results like this without a reflex sight like the RMR above, you have to be Jerry Miculek.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:45 PM
link   
I don't know how to put this without it sounding like I'm insulting you, which I am NOT. I find it more important to be able to hit my target with open sights. I've never liked gadgets, as they add bulk and more protrusions to hang on something in a fast draw. If it works for you and makes you more accurate, more power to ya brother. I do like Trijicon's night sights, but that looks like it's just waiting to hang on a shirt tail. I'll stick to standard 3 dot sights.

BTW What grain are those Hornady's? and are they Critical Defense or Duty?



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 06:53 PM
link   
a reply to: projectvxn

Damn, 1000 yard shot with a 9mm revolver? That guy is awesome.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 07:01 PM
link   
a reply to: DAVID64




I don't know how to put this without it sounding like I'm insulting you, which I am NOT.


I'm not a sensitive person. I can take a little criticism.




I find it more important to be able to hit my target with open sights.


As do I. I have scored expert in the army with nearly every weapons system they employ for ground combat without the assistance of modern optics. In all of my life I have fire a little over 2 million rounds.

That said, modern optics assist, they don't make you an expert marksman over night. You still need to train with them as they are simply a different system.




I've never liked gadgets, as they add bulk and more protrusions to hang on something in a fast draw.


The RMR I mounted has not added any weight to the firearm that is noticeable. it should be noted that almost a sixteenth of an inch of material was removed from the slide to accommodate the RMR. It has not snagged on any of my speed drills.




I do like Trijicon's night sights, but that looks like it's just waiting to hang on a shirt tail. I'll stick to standard 3 dot sights.


I was resistant to try it until I saw the results on a friends' pistol. Since installing mine it has greatly improved my speed.




BTW What grain are those Hornady's? and are they Critical Defense or Duty?


135gr Critical Duty, though I do use both.
edit on pWed, 07 Oct 2015 19:11:16 -050020157America/Chicago2015-10-07T19:11:16-05:0031vx10 by projectvxn because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 07:50 PM
link   

originally posted by: slednecktx
a reply to: projectvxn

Damn, 1000 yard shot with a 9mm revolver? That guy is awesome.

No it was as 1000 rounds. The target was at 20 yards.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 07:52 PM
link   
Trained myself to point shoot with 10,000 plus rounds through Glock 17 back in the 90's.

Usually use bowling pins at 20 yards and hit on fast draw, point shoot right out of holster.

It's all muscle memory now after 25 years of doing this.

No time wasted bringing gun up for sight picture nor getting into a stance.

Blah on gadgetry like lasers, fancy glowing sights or reflexology on pistols.

Pull, fire.

Train like you fight, fight like you train.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 07:56 PM
link   
I've got a somewhat similar one on a short rifle (.444 Marlin) that I like.

I tried these on sidearms and they're not bad, although I've had some issues with durability of the sight. But what I don't like is the light loss. Every one of this type of sight I've seen cuts the light significantly, to the point you can't use them in dim light.

I feel a lot more confident in tritium blade sights for sidearms. IMHO.



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 08:07 PM
link   

originally posted by: Shamrock6

originally posted by: Aliensun
a reply to: projectvxn

I see absolutely no advantage over a laser.
Try having cover behind a post or barrel and looking at the target from one side and shooting from around the other side.
Laser are really good at night too.
No contest.


Why on earth would you ever stick your head out one side of cover and your weapon out the other side and start shooting? The hell kind of technique is that?


Just gotta say......i think sombody has seen to many movies



posted on Oct, 7 2015 @ 08:12 PM
link   

originally posted by: projectvxn
I've been evaluating the Trijicon RMR for the better part of a month on my Glock 19 Gen 4. It is my opinion that these types of sighting systems are the future of handguns for various reasons:

1. The Weapon

Glock 19 Generation 4. Slide milled to accept RMR mounting.


2. The Sight

Trijicon RMR RM05, 9 MOA Amber Dot Reflex Sight.



This sight requires no batteries. It is a combination ambient light gathering fiber optic and tritium gas.

On to the Glock 19 Gen 4. The evaluation was not of the pistol. I've put 1000 or so flawless rounds through it. It is a reliable carry pistol and it is incredibly accurate when you can wring it out using the proper equipment.

The month long training period was focused entirely on the RMR. I took it out to 20 yards. I used speed shooting techniques as well as speed draw. There were a few errant rounds on the target due to momentary lapses in trigger discipline. Otherwise what you see is 150 rounds on target at 20 yards.



This is near rifle accuracy being squeezed out of a pistol with a 4 inch barrel. 3 dot sight, the U and Dot of the stock Glock sights, or post and dot night sights cannot compare to this kind of accuracy at all.

Why? Because I can use BOTH of my eyes to track, acquire, and hit the target. There's no sight alignment required. Where the dot is pointed is where the bullet will hit.

There is a learning curve, however. Because of the design of the system, with a curved window, acquiring the dot can be problematic at first. That is why it is important top train with it. The image above, at 20 yards, using the techniques described above, are the result of consistent training with the sight system.

You can find these from $300 to $600 depending on model, whether it was used or not, or whether it is on sale or not. I found a used one for $280 on Ebay. Services who offer slide milling for the RMR are plentiful on the internet and can be expensive depending on the additional services you request.

Ladies and Gentlemen these sights, and some like it(Leupold Delta Point, Burris Fast Fire, and a few others) are the future of handgun sighting. Notch and post and 3 dot are a thing of the past and should be treated as such. The results speak for themselves.


Most electronic pistol sights are not as accurate as regular iron sights and if I got into a high stress situation where I needed quick and very accurate fire I wouldn't use a electronic sight. The only sight actually worth using is a scope on hunting handgun I use one on my 10mm 1911 with hot loads and on my Ruger Redhawk .44 magnum.
As someone who has had to defend myself with my carry gun and as the owner of an indoor gun range I wouldn't use a red dot of any kind on handgun,with a rifle it is less of a issue,but generally it is best to get well acquainted with your iron sights. I'm used to my handgun iron sights and can hit the center of a bullseye with every handgun I own at 50 yards and have won money doing it with my S&W 642 snub .38 special.
The secret is good eye sight and aiming with both eyes,also practice with moving small targets like clay pigeons. The other secret is lots of practice I put around 2,000- 3,000 rounds through my carry gun every six months and have been doing so for seven years.
edit on 7-10-2015 by VashTheStampede because: Added extra info



new topics




 
10
<<   2  3  4 >>

log in

join