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Men may feel more threatened by female bosses, research finds

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posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:22 AM
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The more i read the more i realize that masculinity seems to be a fairly fragile thing.

At least this study (and others) would seem to indicate that.


From Science Daily and the Journal of the Society for Personal and Social Psychology

Here's an excerpt...


Men are more threatened by female supervisors and become more assertive in advocating for themselves in negotiation exercises, new social psychology research has found. Self-assertive behavior by men toward female bosses can disrupt the workplace dynamics, stifle team cohesiveness and negatively affect team performance, researchers say.

Men may feel threatened by female supervisors and act more assertively toward them than male bosses, which could disrupt the workplace with struggles over power dynamics, according to new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

"The concept of masculinity is becoming more elusive in society as gender roles blur, with more women taking management positions and becoming the major breadwinners for their families," said lead researcher Ekaterina Netchaeva, an assistant professor of management and technology at Bocconi University in Milan, Italy. "Even men who support gender equality may see these advances as a threat to their masculinity, whether they consciously acknowledge it or not."

While women are underrepresented in senior management positions in the United States, they are almost on par with men at middle and lower management levels, according to Labor Department statistics. In three experiments, Netchaeva and her co-authors discovered that men feel more threatened when they answer to female bosses.

In an experiment with 76 college students (52 male, 24 female) at a U.S. university, participants were told they would negotiate their salary at a new job in a computer exercise with a male or female hiring manager. After the negotiation, participants took an implicit threat test where they guessed words that appeared on a computer screen for a fraction of a second. Participants who chose more threat-related words, including "fear" or "risk," were judged to feel more threatened.

Male participants who negotiated with a female manager exhibited more threat and pushed for a higher salary ($49,400 average), compared to men negotiating with a male manager ($42,870 average). The manager's gender didn't affect female participants, who negotiated for a lower salary ($41,346 average), reflecting a common trend where women tend to be less aggressive than men in negotiations, Netchaeva said.

In another experiment, 68 male college students had to decide how to split a $10,000 bonus with a male or female team member or supervisor. Male participants evenly split the money with male or female team members, but men felt more threatened by a female supervisor and tried to keep more money for themselves than with a male supervisor.

In a similar experiment conducted online with 370 adult participants (226 male, 144 female) from the United States, men were more receptive to female supervisors who were described as proactive and direct rather than self-promotive and power-seeking. Specifically, male participants tried to keep a larger share of the $10,000 bonus if the female manager was described as ambitious or power-seeking. Female participants offered roughly the same bonus amount to proactive or ambitious female managers.


More at this link

What do you guys think about this?




posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:31 AM
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I have worked in management roles since before my 20's and I have found in all of those roles that men don't like it and they were more assertive in their attitude even though vastly under qualified for questioning my authority.

That has been my experience, it isn't up for debate or for the usual hordes of women hating men /misogynists or accusations of ''misandry'' or ''sexism''.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:31 AM
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One week out of the month I agree with you .




Hell female employees used to scare me !!!!
edit on 14-7-2015 by Greathouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:32 AM
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Masculinity is being marginalized while Femininity is being lauded. It's no wonder men feel threatened by female bosses.

In the interest of balancing the scales, men have lost a lost of power in society. We can debate over whether that is bad, or good. But that's the primary reason men feel threatened by females in power. It's a sign they're no longer the sole gender at the top of the food chain anymore.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:39 AM
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originally posted by: theabsolutetruth
I have worked in management roles since before my 20's and I have found in all of those roles that men don't like it and they were more assertive in their attitude even though vastly under qualified for questioning my authority.


I have experienced this just recently at a job i am in the 2nd year of. i was promoted to a managerial role and guys are always trying to question my decisions, undermine me, etc. it makes me want to just say f- it and tell my boss that i'd rather go back to being a worker bee. if the pay was the same i probably would. but then wouldn't that make the problem WORSE?



That has been my experience, it isn't up for debate or for the usual hordes of women hating men /misogynists or accusations of ''misandry'' or ''sexism''.


i know right?! god i hate that whole way of shutting down these conversations.
edit on 14-7-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)

edit on 14-7-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:43 AM
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Meh. I don't care if you're a male or female boss, as long as you know what you're doing.. Don't tell me how to build a house or weld a seam , when all you have is a degree in pushing paper.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:44 AM
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originally posted by: ScientificRailgun
Masculinity is being marginalized while Femininity is being lauded. It's no wonder men feel threatened by female bosses.

In the interest of balancing the scales, men have lost a lost of power in society. We can debate over whether that is bad, or good. But that's the primary reason men feel threatened by females in power. It's a sign they're no longer the sole gender at the top of the food chain anymore.


I sometimes feel that men need to find a balance within themselves and accept that they are equals now. part of that acceptance might scare them i guess?

there are different kinds of power btw...



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:44 AM
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a reply to: ScientificRailgun

Men being paid more in the workplace for the same jobs suggests otherwise.

Women are expected to have a career and anyone with intelligence knows that it isn't a great plan in expecting a man to pay for everything all your life or even to be in the same relationship after years, therefore it is imperative that women are able to support themselves for their own safety and security.

Many women in the workplace are supporting their families themselves whilst also having children which means finding jobs with the right hours, that are flexible to parents and finding appropriate childcare, neither of which are easily available these days and childcare is also not cheap and often neither a great standard nor flexible.

www.bloomberg.com...


High-achieving women are paid less than men even when they have similar levels of experience and are in the same fields, according to new Bloomberg Businessweek data. Women graduating business school this year reported an average of $14,548 less in expected annual pay than men, graduating MBAs said in a survey of 9,965 students at 112 schools, conducted as part of our recently published biennial ranking of MBA programs.


www.tuc.org.uk...


Women working full-time still earn almost £5,000 a year less than men, though the pay gap in some jobs is three times bigger, according to a TUC analysis of official figures published to mark Equal Pay Day today (Thursday).
Equal Pay Day marks the point at which women working full-time effectively stop earning as they are paid 15 per cent less per hour than men working full-time. But in certain professions the gender pay gap is much wider, says the TUC.
According to the research, female health professionals have the biggest pay gap at 31 per cent, which works out at £16,000 a year. A key reason for the size of the pay gap in health is the earnings of the best-paid professionals. Top male professionals in health earn nearly £50 an hour, twice as much as top earning women who earn £24.67 an hour.
Women working in culture, media and sport experience the next biggest pay gap at 27.5 per cent – which works out at £10,000 a year – while women working in manufacturing occupations earn nearly 24 per cent less than men.
Women earn less than men in 32 of the 35 major occupations classified by the Office for National Statistics. The three major occupations where women earn more than men – transport drivers, electricians and agricultural workers – are all male dominated. Fewer than 50,000 women are employed in these sectors, compared to 1.5 million men.
The gender pay gap across the private sector is 19.9 per cent, far higher than the 13.6 per cent pay gap in the public sector.
The gender pay gap is even bigger for women working part-time, who earn 35 per cent less per hour than men working full-time. Equal Pay Day for women working part-time was back on 27 August.
The TUC believes that as four decades of equal pay legislation have only halved – rather than eradicated – the gender pay gap, a tougher approach is needed to stop millions of workers losing out on pay and career opportunities, simply because of their gender.
One of the reasons for the gender pay gap is the lack of transparency in pay systems that allow companies to pay female employees less than their male colleagues, without staff even being aware of it, says the TUC. Publishing annual gender pay gap information and conducting regular pay audits would enable companies to identify any gender pay gaps, and take action to close them.
However, with just one in 100 companies voluntarily publishing equal pay information, the TUC wants the government to legislate and make audits compulsory additions to annual company reports.
More senior level part-time jobs are also needed to help women continue their careers after having children, says the TUC. Too many women are forced to trade down their jobs and abandon their careers just to find working hours that can fit around their childcare arrangements.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:45 AM
link   

originally posted by: JadeStar
The more i read the more i realize that masculinity seems to be a fairly fragile thing.

At least this study (and others) would seem to indicate that.


From Science Daily and the Journal of the Society for Personal and Social Psychology

Here's an excerpt...


Men are more threatened by female supervisors and become more assertive in advocating for themselves in negotiation exercises, new social psychology research has found. Self-assertive behavior by men toward female bosses can disrupt the workplace dynamics, stifle team cohesiveness and negatively affect team performance, researchers say.

Men may feel threatened by female supervisors and act more assertively toward them than male bosses, which could disrupt the workplace with struggles over power dynamics, according to new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

"The concept of masculinity is becoming more elusive in society as gender roles blur, with more women taking management positions and becoming the major breadwinners for their families," said lead researcher Ekaterina Netchaeva, an assistant professor of management and technology at Bocconi University in Milan, Italy. "Even men who support gender equality may see these advances as a threat to their masculinity, whether they consciously acknowledge it or not."

While women are underrepresented in senior management positions in the United States, they are almost on par with men at middle and lower management levels, according to Labor Department statistics. In three experiments, Netchaeva and her co-authors discovered that men feel more threatened when they answer to female bosses.

In an experiment with 76 college students (52 male, 24 female) at a U.S. university, participants were told they would negotiate their salary at a new job in a computer exercise with a male or female hiring manager. After the negotiation, participants took an implicit threat test where they guessed words that appeared on a computer screen for a fraction of a second. Participants who chose more threat-related words, including "fear" or "risk," were judged to feel more threatened.

Male participants who negotiated with a female manager exhibited more threat and pushed for a higher salary ($49,400 average), compared to men negotiating with a male manager ($42,870 average). The manager's gender didn't affect female participants, who negotiated for a lower salary ($41,346 average), reflecting a common trend where women tend to be less aggressive than men in negotiations, Netchaeva said.

In another experiment, 68 male college students had to decide how to split a $10,000 bonus with a male or female team member or supervisor. Male participants evenly split the money with male or female team members, but men felt more threatened by a female supervisor and tried to keep more money for themselves than with a male supervisor.

In a similar experiment conducted online with 370 adult participants (226 male, 144 female) from the United States, men were more receptive to female supervisors who were described as proactive and direct rather than self-promotive and power-seeking. Specifically, male participants tried to keep a larger share of the $10,000 bonus if the female manager was described as ambitious or power-seeking. Female participants offered roughly the same bonus amount to proactive or ambitious female managers.


More at this link

What do you guys think about this?


As long as my female boss is good looking, I don't mind working extensively underneath her, if you get my drift.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:45 AM
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originally posted by: DAVID64
Meh. I don't care if you're a male or female boss, as long as you know what you're doing.. Don't tell me how to build a house or weld a seam , when all you have is a degree in pushing paper.


what if that degree was in metallurgy and structural engineering?

paper is worth something too.
edit on 14-7-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:46 AM
link   

originally posted by: UnBreakable

originally posted by: JadeStar
The more i read the more i realize that masculinity seems to be a fairly fragile thing.

At least this study (and others) would seem to indicate that.


From Science Daily and the Journal of the Society for Personal and Social Psychology

Here's an excerpt...


Men are more threatened by female supervisors and become more assertive in advocating for themselves in negotiation exercises, new social psychology research has found. Self-assertive behavior by men toward female bosses can disrupt the workplace dynamics, stifle team cohesiveness and negatively affect team performance, researchers say.

Men may feel threatened by female supervisors and act more assertively toward them than male bosses, which could disrupt the workplace with struggles over power dynamics, according to new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

"The concept of masculinity is becoming more elusive in society as gender roles blur, with more women taking management positions and becoming the major breadwinners for their families," said lead researcher Ekaterina Netchaeva, an assistant professor of management and technology at Bocconi University in Milan, Italy. "Even men who support gender equality may see these advances as a threat to their masculinity, whether they consciously acknowledge it or not."

While women are underrepresented in senior management positions in the United States, they are almost on par with men at middle and lower management levels, according to Labor Department statistics. In three experiments, Netchaeva and her co-authors discovered that men feel more threatened when they answer to female bosses.

In an experiment with 76 college students (52 male, 24 female) at a U.S. university, participants were told they would negotiate their salary at a new job in a computer exercise with a male or female hiring manager. After the negotiation, participants took an implicit threat test where they guessed words that appeared on a computer screen for a fraction of a second. Participants who chose more threat-related words, including "fear" or "risk," were judged to feel more threatened.

Male participants who negotiated with a female manager exhibited more threat and pushed for a higher salary ($49,400 average), compared to men negotiating with a male manager ($42,870 average). The manager's gender didn't affect female participants, who negotiated for a lower salary ($41,346 average), reflecting a common trend where women tend to be less aggressive than men in negotiations, Netchaeva said.

In another experiment, 68 male college students had to decide how to split a $10,000 bonus with a male or female team member or supervisor. Male participants evenly split the money with male or female team members, but men felt more threatened by a female supervisor and tried to keep more money for themselves than with a male supervisor.

In a similar experiment conducted online with 370 adult participants (226 male, 144 female) from the United States, men were more receptive to female supervisors who were described as proactive and direct rather than self-promotive and power-seeking. Specifically, male participants tried to keep a larger share of the $10,000 bonus if the female manager was described as ambitious or power-seeking. Female participants offered roughly the same bonus amount to proactive or ambitious female managers.


More at this link

What do you guys think about this?


As long as my female boss is good looking, I don't mind working extensively underneath her, if you get my drift.


As my mom would say: "Oh no you didn't?!"



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:47 AM
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Speakin as someone who has worked in middle management for decades: A woman's basic instinct is to nurture, afaik.

This can be a positive in the workplace in that such a mindset is generally good for the company if the person we're talking about (a boss) is accepting of the standards as laid out by the administration, but don't expect complete cooperation if not. The same could be said of male bosses, sure, but perhaps a female might be a little more strident in her objections. Much depends on personality.

Regarding interpersonal relations with those under her watch, unfortunately, can still be problematic as many men, although willing to capitulate when instructed by a higher ranking male, will doggedly question a female bosses' directives. Not sure why that is, but this has been my observation.

Perhaps, as someone close to me once said; "A female boss is sometimes prone to chiding reluctant workers, treating them like children". Maybe that has to do with the nurturing instinct.

I dunno. I'm no psychoanalyst.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:48 AM
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a reply to: JadeStar

My experience is that while man in managerial jobs are often totally swaying from policy, women have to keep tightly on it as there are a horde of men just waiting to criticize. The best way I have found is to keep professional at all times, as a lot of men try wangling their way via the relationship angle (another few threads) and to keep strong, being good at the job and getting the guys on side, delegation is a good idea as long as they know who is in charge.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:50 AM
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originally posted by: theabsolutetruth
a reply to: ScientificRailgun

Men being paid more in the workplace for the same jobs suggests otherwise.

Women are expected to have a career and anyone with intelligence knows that it isn't a great plan in expecting a man to pay for everything all your life or even to be in the same relationship after years, therefore it is imperative that women are able to support themselves for their own safety and security.

Many women in the workplace are supporting their families themselves whilst also having children which means finding jobs with the right hours, that are flexible to parents and finding appropriate childcare, neither of which are easily available these days and childcare is also not cheap and often neither a great standard nor flexible.

www.bloomberg.com...


*APPLAUSE* star for you!




Wasn't "equal pay for equal work" a slogan like back in the 1970s?

And yet we still do not have it.

That right there tells us all we need to know about arguments to the contrary.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:53 AM
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originally posted by: theabsolutetruth
a reply to: JadeStar

My experience is that while man in managerial jobs are often totally swaying from policy, women have to keep tightly on it as there are a horde of men just waiting to criticize. The best way I have found is to keep professional at all times, as a lot of men try wangling their way via the relationship angle (another few threads) and to keep strong, being good at the job and getting the guys on side, delegation is a good idea as long as they know who is in charge.


Thank you so much for that. What you say is similar to something my sister told me. She said "smile just enough to get them on side, but not too much that they take it the wrong way. be friendly but professional and don't be afraid to speak up and call them out when they do something wrong, assert yourself when necessary but always be friendly and approachable."



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:54 AM
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a reply to: masqua

That isn't my experience of women in the workplace at all, in fact the opposite when it is about employees.

My own style is running a tight ship and getting the staff on board with making improvements and taking pride in doing their job to specification, with checks to ensure they are consistently performing to standard or above and incentives.

My own nurturing aspect in the workplace is for a strong cohesive team where people are 100% on task but also work in a nurturing environment, where each are sensitive to the entire team, it is the best system for a well oiled machine, each staff member is supportive to each other and to management, team ethos and the project goal.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:55 AM
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a reply to: JadeStar




Men may feel threatened by female supervisors and act more assertively toward them than male bosses,


Meh here's the quick and dirty. It's because women bosses have more to prove because being a woman in the workforce is more of a struggle than for men. Right? So what happens is called 'causation' and men respond aggressively and more assertive alpha roles as a counter response.

Male bosses don't have the complex women have so they're much more relaxed. Guys get along much better this way because that's how we're wired. Drama free. Throw a man hating assertive female boss with an inferiority complex into a male dominated workplace and watch what happens...



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:58 AM
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The following is my opinion as a member participating in this discussion.

Threatened? No. I do work better under a male supervisor/boss though. This is a broad generalization gleaned from years of work experience -- but typically male bosses are more even-keeled and their expectations are more clear. You can generally depend on them to be more stable and consistent from day-to-day.

I worked with around 30 menopausal women for years as the only male (younger) and it was a living nightmare. The catfights, the backstabbing, the drama really wore on me. I just want to go to my job, do it, and go home. I'm not there to make friends, enemies or discuss my personal life. If I happen to make a friend, that's great. If I don't make any friends -- that's OK too.

I've had a fantastic female boss once...best boss I actually ever have had. She was hard working, clear, professional, fun and we're still friends years later.

I just know that when I have worked under women, I generally never know what to expect in the morning. Her kid may be sick, her dog might have died, her show may have ended, her dinner got ruined -- whatever it may be could have upset her. In my personal experience women seem to drag more of their personal lives into the workplace.

I would have to amp up my "feelers" to get a read on my female bosses first thing in the morning to get a sense of how the day was going to go. I've never had to do this with male bosses. Is it healthy for men to bottle up emotions? No, absolutely not! But, in a workplace environment, it's best to deal with those emotions outside of the office. Your personal life shouldn't become my personal life.


As an ATS Staff Member, I will not moderate in threads such as this where I have participated as a member.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 11:59 AM
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a reply to: JadeStar

The Swiss have a good idea for that.

jezebel.com...


April 9 was equal pay day in the U.S., where the wage gap remains a stubbornly high 23%. In Switzerland, where the gap is closer to an even 20%, a bank cooperated with a local women's organization to make this video dramatizing that country's wage gap. When men tried to withdraw CHF100 from an ATM, they received CHF80 instead. Their variously angry, bewildered, and violent reactions — until the ATM receipts explain the prank — are priceless.





posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:02 PM
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I've had a female boss and she loved me as a worker, matter of fact I wouldn't have gotten a raise if it werent for her and I've had a male boss that would be much more threatening then any woman in a higher position where you'd definitely like to question his work strategies.

I had males in higher positions that would bitch and be more emotionally involved about work way more then any woman could, and have had woman act much more professional in manner but then again it really comes down to the person or people your dealing with when it comes to any workplace.

Check twice and cut once so it done right.
edit on 14-7-2015 by Specimen because: (no reason given)



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