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Men may feel more threatened by female bosses, research finds

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posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:25 PM
link   

originally posted by: theabsolutetruth
a reply to: masqua

That isn't my experience of women in the workplace at all, in fact the opposite when it is about employees.

My own style is running a tight ship and getting the staff on board with making improvements and taking pride in doing their job to specification, with checks to ensure they are consistently performing to standard or above and incentives.

My own nurturing aspect in the workplace is for a strong cohesive team where people are 100% on task but also work in a nurturing environment, where each are sensitive to the entire team, it is the best system for a well oiled machine, each staff member is supportive to each other and to management, team ethos and the project goal.


Like with where I work, we kind of are all friends and some of us even hung out socially after work. that dynamic changed this year when i was promoted because it wouldn't necessarily be professional for me to do that. now the other women i work with understand that and nothing has changed and i haven't had any issues from any of them. same with some of the men but there are others who have been let's just say challenging...

so i just want everything to be friendly and cordial and everyone does their best like it used to be. none of us really questioned our old boss but he moved on and now i'm in this weird position of being most of these people's friend but also in a managerial role. its sooooo hard. i just want everyone to get along and be awesome together.




posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:25 PM
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a reply to: JadeStar

I hate Jezebel with every fiber of my being. Third wave feminism sickens me. Doing articles on "stare rape" and "manspreading".

There are REAL issues to tackle, such as the aforementioned pay gap, how we're unfairly given bias in family court, etc.

I could care less if some guy is mentally undressing me. I do it to hot guys all the time. Big freakin' whoop.

I digress, that's my rant on Jezebel.

Men are feeling threatened by the female becoming an actual force in the working world. This is especially true when a woman is promoted rather then men who applied for the same promotion. Rather than self-reflecting on why they weren't chosen, the lay the blame on something they can't control as a coping mechanism.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:26 PM
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Meh, if anything the worker drones should have way more pay then any boss that does nothing but whine and whine costing efficiency not going to the root of the problems for solutions. Their pay should be just the luxury of not getting their hands dirty.


edit on 14-7-2015 by Specimen because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: ScientificRailgun

originally posted by: theabsolutetruth
a reply to: ScientificRailgun

Men being paid more in the workplace for the same jobs suggests otherwise.

Women are expected to have a career and anyone with intelligence knows that it isn't a great plan in expecting a man to pay for everything all your life or even to be in the same relationship after years, therefore it is imperative that women are able to support themselves for their own safety and security.

Many women in the workplace are supporting their families themselves whilst also having children which means finding jobs with the right hours, that are flexible to parents and finding appropriate childcare, neither of which are easily available these days and childcare is also not cheap and often neither a great standard nor flexible.

www.bloomberg.com...


High-achieving women are paid less than men even when they have similar levels of experience and are in the same fields, according to new Bloomberg Businessweek data. Women graduating business school this year reported an average of $14,548 less in expected annual pay than men, graduating MBAs said in a survey of 9,965 students at 112 schools, conducted as part of our recently published biennial ranking of MBA programs.


www.tuc.org.uk...


Women working full-time still earn almost £5,000 a year less than men, though the pay gap in some jobs is three times bigger, according to a TUC analysis of official figures published to mark Equal Pay Day today (Thursday).
Equal Pay Day marks the point at which women working full-time effectively stop earning as they are paid 15 per cent less per hour than men working full-time. But in certain professions the gender pay gap is much wider, says the TUC.
According to the research, female health professionals have the biggest pay gap at 31 per cent, which works out at £16,000 a year. A key reason for the size of the pay gap in health is the earnings of the best-paid professionals. Top male professionals in health earn nearly £50 an hour, twice as much as top earning women who earn £24.67 an hour.
Women working in culture, media and sport experience the next biggest pay gap at 27.5 per cent – which works out at £10,000 a year – while women working in manufacturing occupations earn nearly 24 per cent less than men.
Women earn less than men in 32 of the 35 major occupations classified by the Office for National Statistics. The three major occupations where women earn more than men – transport drivers, electricians and agricultural workers – are all male dominated. Fewer than 50,000 women are employed in these sectors, compared to 1.5 million men.
The gender pay gap across the private sector is 19.9 per cent, far higher than the 13.6 per cent pay gap in the public sector.
The gender pay gap is even bigger for women working part-time, who earn 35 per cent less per hour than men working full-time. Equal Pay Day for women working part-time was back on 27 August.
The TUC believes that as four decades of equal pay legislation have only halved – rather than eradicated – the gender pay gap, a tougher approach is needed to stop millions of workers losing out on pay and career opportunities, simply because of their gender.
One of the reasons for the gender pay gap is the lack of transparency in pay systems that allow companies to pay female employees less than their male colleagues, without staff even being aware of it, says the TUC. Publishing annual gender pay gap information and conducting regular pay audits would enable companies to identify any gender pay gaps, and take action to close them.
However, with just one in 100 companies voluntarily publishing equal pay information, the TUC wants the government to legislate and make audits compulsory additions to annual company reports.
More senior level part-time jobs are also needed to help women continue their careers after having children, says the TUC. Too many women are forced to trade down their jobs and abandon their careers just to find working hours that can fit around their childcare arrangements.


I never implied we were equal with men yet. Yes there's still more to be done such as decreasing the pay gap.

But that doesn't change the fact the men are feeling marginalized and threatened with their increasingly "optional" role in a female's life.


How can we make men feel more comfortable as this shifts?
The impetus isn't on us to make men feel comfortable with the transition. And truth be told, some men simply won't EVER be comfortable with a more equal workforce. Thankfully, hopefully, these men are part of a generation that will be dying soon.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:28 PM
link   

originally posted by: NavyDoc

originally posted by: JadeStar
The more i read the more i realize that masculinity seems to be a fairly fragile thing.



No judgment intended, but I find it interesting that you said the above, given your life history.


That has little to nothing to do with this issue though. No one at my job knows my life history.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:28 PM
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originally posted by: Krazysh0t
a reply to: JadeStar

I've had a female boss before and I have no problem taking orders from a woman.


In so many ways you are an extremely open and exceptional fellow though.
edit on 14-7-2015 by JadeStar because: (no reason given)



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:29 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

It's tough sometimes to be the manager. People take offense to strange things when you ask them to do things. It's one of the reasons why the military doesn't let managers (sergeants) be personal friends with the lower enlisted soldiers. The best you can do is just be as respectful as possible. Hopefully, eventually those guys will come around. If not, just kindly remind them that you do their performance reviews.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:31 PM
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originally posted by: UnBreakable

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: UnBreakable

originally posted by: JadeStar
The more i read the more i realize that masculinity seems to be a fairly fragile thing.

At least this study (and others) would seem to indicate that.


From Science Daily and the Journal of the Society for Personal and Social Psychology

Here's an excerpt...


Men are more threatened by female supervisors and become more assertive in advocating for themselves in negotiation exercises, new social psychology research has found. Self-assertive behavior by men toward female bosses can disrupt the workplace dynamics, stifle team cohesiveness and negatively affect team performance, researchers say.

Men may feel threatened by female supervisors and act more assertively toward them than male bosses, which could disrupt the workplace with struggles over power dynamics, according to new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

"The concept of masculinity is becoming more elusive in society as gender roles blur, with more women taking management positions and becoming the major breadwinners for their families," said lead researcher Ekaterina Netchaeva, an assistant professor of management and technology at Bocconi University in Milan, Italy. "Even men who support gender equality may see these advances as a threat to their masculinity, whether they consciously acknowledge it or not."

While women are underrepresented in senior management positions in the United States, they are almost on par with men at middle and lower management levels, according to Labor Department statistics. In three experiments, Netchaeva and her co-authors discovered that men feel more threatened when they answer to female bosses.

In an experiment with 76 college students (52 male, 24 female) at a U.S. university, participants were told they would negotiate their salary at a new job in a computer exercise with a male or female hiring manager. After the negotiation, participants took an implicit threat test where they guessed words that appeared on a computer screen for a fraction of a second. Participants who chose more threat-related words, including "fear" or "risk," were judged to feel more threatened.

Male participants who negotiated with a female manager exhibited more threat and pushed for a higher salary ($49,400 average), compared to men negotiating with a male manager ($42,870 average). The manager's gender didn't affect female participants, who negotiated for a lower salary ($41,346 average), reflecting a common trend where women tend to be less aggressive than men in negotiations, Netchaeva said.

In another experiment, 68 male college students had to decide how to split a $10,000 bonus with a male or female team member or supervisor. Male participants evenly split the money with male or female team members, but men felt more threatened by a female supervisor and tried to keep more money for themselves than with a male supervisor.

In a similar experiment conducted online with 370 adult participants (226 male, 144 female) from the United States, men were more receptive to female supervisors who were described as proactive and direct rather than self-promotive and power-seeking. Specifically, male participants tried to keep a larger share of the $10,000 bonus if the female manager was described as ambitious or power-seeking. Female participants offered roughly the same bonus amount to proactive or ambitious female managers.


More at this link

What do you guys think about this?


As long as my female boss is good looking, I don't mind working extensively underneath her, if you get my drift.


As my mom would say: "Oh no you didn't?!"


That was a valid office workplace joke pre-1985. Nowadays that joke would warrant a trip to HR for sexual harassment, if not worse.


And rightly so.
Is that a complaint?



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:32 PM
link   
Thought some might enjoy this video.




posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:33 PM
link   

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: NavyDoc

originally posted by: JadeStar
The more i read the more i realize that masculinity seems to be a fairly fragile thing.



No judgment intended, but I find it interesting that you said the above, given your life history.


That has little to nothing to do with this issue though. No one at my job knows my life history.


I just found it interesting--because I would assume, like anyone else, one's life history affects how one perceives the world.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:35 PM
link   
a reply to: olaru12

The statistics suggest otherwise.

www.tuc.org.uk...


Women working full-time still earn almost £5,000 a year less than men, though the pay gap in some jobs is three times bigger, according to a TUC analysis of official figures published to mark Equal Pay Day today (Thursday).
Equal Pay Day marks the point at which women working full-time effectively stop earning as they are paid 15 per cent less per hour than men working full-time. But in certain professions the gender pay gap is much wider, says the TUC.
According to the research, female health professionals have the biggest pay gap at 31 per cent, which works out at £16,000 a year. A key reason for the size of the pay gap in health is the earnings of the best-paid professionals. Top male professionals in health earn nearly £50 an hour, twice as much as top earning women who earn £24.67 an hour.

Women working in culture, media and sport experience the next biggest pay gap at 27.5 per cent – which works out at £10,000 a year – while women working in manufacturing occupations earn nearly 24 per cent less than men.

Women earn less than men in 32 of the 35 major occupations classified by the Office for National Statistics. The three major occupations where women earn more than men – transport drivers, electricians and agricultural workers – are all male dominated. Fewer than 50,000 women are employed in these sectors, compared to 1.5 million men.

The gender pay gap across the private sector is 19.9 per cent, far higher than the 13.6 per cent pay gap in the public sector.

The gender pay gap is even bigger for women working part-time, who earn 35 per cent less per hour than men working full-time. Equal Pay Day for women working part-time was back on 27 August.

The TUC believes that as four decades of equal pay legislation have only halved – rather than eradicated – the gender pay gap, a tougher approach is needed to stop millions of workers losing out on pay and career opportunities, simply because of their gender.

One of the reasons for the gender pay gap is the lack of transparency in pay systems that allow companies to pay female employees less than their male colleagues, without staff even being aware of it, says the TUC. Publishing annual gender pay gap information and conducting regular pay audits would enable companies to identify any gender pay gaps, and take action to close them.

However, with just one in 100 companies voluntarily publishing equal pay information, the TUC wants the government to legislate and make audits compulsory additions to annual company reports.

More senior level part-time jobs are also needed to help women continue their careers after having children, says the TUC. Too many women are forced to trade down their jobs and abandon their careers just to find working hours that can fit around their childcare arrangements.


flavorwire.com...


The pay gap directly or indirectly affects most workers and their families: women in the US working full-time make only 78 cents for every dollar a man makes, while it gets worse when compounded with racial inequality: a Latina woman earns only 56 cents to that dollar.

While finance and the insurance industry may be worse, the culture world has its own pay and representation gap. Below is a brief look at some of the disparities in the arts, media, and other cultural industries. The data here is incomplete — I couldn’t find anything reliable about the music industry, for instance — but it’s worth noting that race inevitably adds a second pay gap, while less visibility for women in an industry, or women’s skewing younger or pooling in non-management positions compared to men, generally suggests a larger pay inequality too.

Book Publishing:

According to Publishers Weekly‘s 2014 salary survey, the salary gap in the publishing industry is massive — even though women comprise the majority of the workforce. Women were also underrepresented in management.

Meanwhile, the pay gap between men and women—the other well-known imbalance in the industry—continued in 2013, even though women accounted for 74% of the publishing workforce and men only 26%. The average compensation for men in 2013 was $85,000, the same as in 2012, while average compensation for women rose to $60,750 last year, up from $56,000 the year before. Women filled at least 70% of the jobs in sales and marketing, operations, and editorial, but only 51% of the management positions.
Film:

While there’s no exact cents on the dollar figure for film, we do know a few statistics that suggest a massive pay gap thanks to the Celluloid Ceiling report in 2014.

First of all, women are relegated to less profitable genres: “women were most likely to work in the documentary and comedy genres. They were least likely to work in the action and horror genres” — two major grossers. And as for overall representation behind the screen, little has budged in decades: “In 2014, women comprised 17% of all directors, writers, producers, executive producers, editors, and cinematographers working on the top 250 (domestic) grossing films. This is the same percentage of women working in these roles in 1998.”

Gaming:

In gaming, a survey found that “on average, women made 86 cents on every dollar that men made in the US game industry,” which is better than the overall number but, obviously, not full parity.

Television:

A yawning gender chasm persists in TV acting and directing.

For instance: The Director’s Guild of America found that in 2013, “The percentage of episodes directed by white females inched up from 11 percent to 12 percent,” while “the percentage of episodes directed by minority females slid from 4 percent to 2 percent.” For actors, there’s an added age gap on TV that suggests men are being paid better because they’re older and likely more experienced: “women with speaking parts tended to be considerably younger than men: 30 percent of men but 19 percent of women were in their 20s; 22 percent of men and 14 percent of women were in their 40s.”

Art Sales:

After a single Georgia O’ Keeffe sale, the gender disparity in art sales narrowed, according to FiveThirtyEight.com, but not far enough: “The art sale ‘record gap’ is now about 31 cents to the dollar. Before Thursday, it was 8 cents.”

Literary journals:

We already know, thanks to VIDA, that the literary magazine world is limping towards equality in terms of bylines. But it’s worth noting that legacy publications like The London Review of Books and The New York Review of Books tend to be male-dominated losers in the VIDA count — while being winners in how much they pay.

The Mainstream Media:

The Women’s Media Center commissioned a study of “27,000 pieces of content produced from Oct. 1 through Dec. 31, 2013, at 20 of the most widely circulated, read, viewed, and listened to TV networks, newspapers, news wires, and online news sites in the United States.” The conclusion? “Women collectively were outnumbered by men—whether as paid full-time, freelance writers, online, in print or on air—or as citizen journalists or as non-paid commentators. Overall, 63.4 percen



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:36 PM
link   

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: UnBreakable

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: UnBreakable

originally posted by: JadeStar
The more i read the more i realize that masculinity seems to be a fairly fragile thing.

At least this study (and others) would seem to indicate that.


From Science Daily and the Journal of the Society for Personal and Social Psychology

Here's an excerpt...


Men are more threatened by female supervisors and become more assertive in advocating for themselves in negotiation exercises, new social psychology research has found. Self-assertive behavior by men toward female bosses can disrupt the workplace dynamics, stifle team cohesiveness and negatively affect team performance, researchers say.

Men may feel threatened by female supervisors and act more assertively toward them than male bosses, which could disrupt the workplace with struggles over power dynamics, according to new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

"The concept of masculinity is becoming more elusive in society as gender roles blur, with more women taking management positions and becoming the major breadwinners for their families," said lead researcher Ekaterina Netchaeva, an assistant professor of management and technology at Bocconi University in Milan, Italy. "Even men who support gender equality may see these advances as a threat to their masculinity, whether they consciously acknowledge it or not."

While women are underrepresented in senior management positions in the United States, they are almost on par with men at middle and lower management levels, according to Labor Department statistics. In three experiments, Netchaeva and her co-authors discovered that men feel more threatened when they answer to female bosses.

In an experiment with 76 college students (52 male, 24 female) at a U.S. university, participants were told they would negotiate their salary at a new job in a computer exercise with a male or female hiring manager. After the negotiation, participants took an implicit threat test where they guessed words that appeared on a computer screen for a fraction of a second. Participants who chose more threat-related words, including "fear" or "risk," were judged to feel more threatened.

Male participants who negotiated with a female manager exhibited more threat and pushed for a higher salary ($49,400 average), compared to men negotiating with a male manager ($42,870 average). The manager's gender didn't affect female participants, who negotiated for a lower salary ($41,346 average), reflecting a common trend where women tend to be less aggressive than men in negotiations, Netchaeva said.

In another experiment, 68 male college students had to decide how to split a $10,000 bonus with a male or female team member or supervisor. Male participants evenly split the money with male or female team members, but men felt more threatened by a female supervisor and tried to keep more money for themselves than with a male supervisor.

In a similar experiment conducted online with 370 adult participants (226 male, 144 female) from the United States, men were more receptive to female supervisors who were described as proactive and direct rather than self-promotive and power-seeking. Specifically, male participants tried to keep a larger share of the $10,000 bonus if the female manager was described as ambitious or power-seeking. Female participants offered roughly the same bonus amount to proactive or ambitious female managers.


More at this link

What do you guys think about this?


As long as my female boss is good looking, I don't mind working extensively underneath her, if you get my drift.


As my mom would say: "Oh no you didn't?!"


That was a valid office workplace joke pre-1985. Nowadays that joke would warrant a trip to HR for sexual harassment, if not worse.


And rightly so.
Is that a complaint?


No, not a complaint. Just an observation how sexism and political correctness has evolved in the office workplace over the last thirty years. I've worked in a corporate environment for the past thirty-three years so I know what to say or not say, even jokingly.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:37 PM
link   
a reply to: NavyDoc

LOL, Even in the prophetic documentary called Idiocracy Money ruled.

As long as societies prioritization are based on money , money will make things fair for you. The more money the more fair things become for you.

I doubt Oprah and I in todays world have the same level of fair treatment.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:38 PM
link   

originally posted by: interupt42
a reply to: JadeStar




i was promoted to a managerial role and guys are always trying to question my decisions, undermine me, etc


I'm not saying your gender may not be contributing to it as I don't know your circumstances, but I do see people often using sexual orientation and race as a scapegoat or the easy conclusion as why something is happening.


That's not the case here.

I didn't even think of the race issue to be honest and i only thought of gender because some of the other women thought that was probably the issue when we talked candidly about it in private.

i asked them and some of the guys who had no problems if they thought i was doing anything vastly different than our former boss and they told me no and in some ways i was more organized and that helped them do their job better.



Typically , new management gets treated like that regardless of sex or race in many occupations that I have seen.


Ok, but for how long?



As I a guy I had it happen to me because I was young in the position I earned. In the end its up to you to prove them wrong . Once I proved my self they backed down. I knew my age was going to be an issue for some, so what? Same thing with my race, so what? I figured out quickly that my education , expertise, and knowledge is what made me an asset.

Life isn't fair for many regardless of your gender , race, or age. It just so happens in this day and age that its become politically correct to blame the white guy for everything and minorities as the victims.


Well i'm not blaming "the white guy" here. FWIW one of the guys who constantly is questioning me and my decisions is african-american/black.

Please don't make this about race if it isn't in this case.



Note I'm not a white guy, but I see what is happening and to me this victimization of women and minorities is B$ and a way to keep us fighting among each other.


So now you're the one playing the victim card....



Everyone has to deal with inequality and unfairness in their life,


It is my view that we all should be striving to eliminate such inequality and unfairness.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:40 PM
link   

originally posted by: UnBreakable

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: UnBreakable

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: UnBreakable

originally posted by: JadeStar
The more i read the more i realize that masculinity seems to be a fairly fragile thing.

At least this study (and others) would seem to indicate that.


From Science Daily and the Journal of the Society for Personal and Social Psychology

Here's an excerpt...


Men are more threatened by female supervisors and become more assertive in advocating for themselves in negotiation exercises, new social psychology research has found. Self-assertive behavior by men toward female bosses can disrupt the workplace dynamics, stifle team cohesiveness and negatively affect team performance, researchers say.

Men may feel threatened by female supervisors and act more assertively toward them than male bosses, which could disrupt the workplace with struggles over power dynamics, according to new research published by the Society for Personality and Social Psychology.

"The concept of masculinity is becoming more elusive in society as gender roles blur, with more women taking management positions and becoming the major breadwinners for their families," said lead researcher Ekaterina Netchaeva, an assistant professor of management and technology at Bocconi University in Milan, Italy. "Even men who support gender equality may see these advances as a threat to their masculinity, whether they consciously acknowledge it or not."

While women are underrepresented in senior management positions in the United States, they are almost on par with men at middle and lower management levels, according to Labor Department statistics. In three experiments, Netchaeva and her co-authors discovered that men feel more threatened when they answer to female bosses.

In an experiment with 76 college students (52 male, 24 female) at a U.S. university, participants were told they would negotiate their salary at a new job in a computer exercise with a male or female hiring manager. After the negotiation, participants took an implicit threat test where they guessed words that appeared on a computer screen for a fraction of a second. Participants who chose more threat-related words, including "fear" or "risk," were judged to feel more threatened.

Male participants who negotiated with a female manager exhibited more threat and pushed for a higher salary ($49,400 average), compared to men negotiating with a male manager ($42,870 average). The manager's gender didn't affect female participants, who negotiated for a lower salary ($41,346 average), reflecting a common trend where women tend to be less aggressive than men in negotiations, Netchaeva said.

In another experiment, 68 male college students had to decide how to split a $10,000 bonus with a male or female team member or supervisor. Male participants evenly split the money with male or female team members, but men felt more threatened by a female supervisor and tried to keep more money for themselves than with a male supervisor.

In a similar experiment conducted online with 370 adult participants (226 male, 144 female) from the United States, men were more receptive to female supervisors who were described as proactive and direct rather than self-promotive and power-seeking. Specifically, male participants tried to keep a larger share of the $10,000 bonus if the female manager was described as ambitious or power-seeking. Female participants offered roughly the same bonus amount to proactive or ambitious female managers.


More at this link

What do you guys think about this?


As long as my female boss is good looking, I don't mind working extensively underneath her, if you get my drift.


As my mom would say: "Oh no you didn't?!"


That was a valid office workplace joke pre-1985. Nowadays that joke would warrant a trip to HR for sexual harassment, if not worse.


And rightly so.
Is that a complaint?


No, not a complaint. Just an observation how sexism and political correctness has evolved in the office workplace over the last thirty years. I've worked in a corporate environment for the past thirty-three years so I know what to say or not say, even jokingly.


So you understand how that joke would make some people feel uncomfortable right?



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:43 PM
link   

originally posted by: FlySolo
a reply to: Krazysh0t

What a ridiculous answer. I don't know if that's something I would admit quite like that. A boss is a boss regardless of gender but I wouldn't just take orders from an incompetent boss male or female. Your answer didn't make you sound as masculine as you thought. More of a yes m'am right away m'am because you think being the only guy on the cheerleader squad makes you cool.



Um... what? My response isn't as masculine as I thought? I don't care about masculine appearances on the internet. Where did this point about incompetent bosses come from? Do you think that I can't tell the difference between an incompetent one and a competent one just because she is a woman or something? Seriously, you are reading WAY too far into what I said there.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:44 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

I'd like to call this BS. I have had a female boss in two of my jobs and while one of them is a power hungry person, who likes you until you say No, I've never been threatened by them. I hate when these sort of articles come about or when they talk about it on the news, I couldn't care which gender my boss is as long as they pay me properly and dont treat me like a piece of crap.

Gah, It's like bashing the bloke, is now a motto that a lot of women and news channels are pushing, god forbid if you mention a woman is attacked or people say something about them but if its against a blokes, that's fine.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:45 PM
link   

originally posted by: NavyDoc

originally posted by: JadeStar

originally posted by: NavyDoc

originally posted by: JadeStar
The more i read the more i realize that masculinity seems to be a fairly fragile thing.



No judgment intended, but I find it interesting that you said the above, given your life history.


That has little to nothing to do with this issue though. No one at my job knows my life history.


I just found it interesting--because I would assume, like anyone else, one's life history affects how one perceives the world.


While true I don't really see how that would matter in this case especially when other female co-workers are the ones who thought that in the case of our work place male ego on the part of some guys was the issue. So this was not solely my judgement.

And to go further into my very early history would lead to thread drift when it's pretty irrelevant to this conversation.



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:45 PM
link   
a reply to: JadeStar

Men ARE more threatened by female bosses.

Nasty creatures....



posted on Jul, 14 2015 @ 12:46 PM
link   
I've had female bosses in the past and never really had much of a problem with them. I know men who hated the fact they were being told what to by a woman. It still happens in my workplace today.
I guess that's just guys being guys.
Myself, I tend to just get on with what i have to do and don't worry about it.



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