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Christians, Jews, and Muslims: Why Do You Worship An Egyptian God?

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posted on May, 29 2015 @ 12:33 PM
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originally posted by: bartholomeo
There is a difference between a "prayer"where a man talks his most deepest feelings to an all powerful being, and "small talk" when one refers to the days of the week.


That's exactly what I was thinking. The context just isn't the same.

Then again, when people don't know, how could it affect them?
Maybe on another planet, Windex is the name of their god and here on planet earth, we just use the word casually.




posted on May, 29 2015 @ 01:29 PM
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a reply to: bartholomeo

Not the way I expected that you would start your thread.

Amen in Hebrew which has no vowels would be identical to Amun. No difference.

Amun is the oldest ( only?) known god to be considered as a creator god, created himself, then his surroundings. No other ancient god was thought of as creating in that way. Other gods were born on earth/ocean/sky and shaped their surroundings by fighting against what was there before them.

Anybody claiming their deity to be creator god is actually claiming Amun.

Amen = so be it = "and god said let there be ... and it was so."

edit on 29-5-2015 by pthena because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 02:15 PM
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a reply to: pthena

I did find a challenger to Amun, Ptah. Strange, two different Egyptian gods claiming to be original creator.

But, Ptah did not reach that high status until 25th dynasty. (760 BC–656 BC) just before Assyria defeated Egypt.

ETA

There may just be a moral to this story:

When threatened by a powerful foe, ascribing primacy to your own deity in such a way that he's before and more powerful than your foe's pantheon isn't exactly a winning strategy.
edit on 29-5-2015 by pthena because: (no reason given)

edit on 29-5-2015 by pthena because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 03:11 PM
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The word “Amen” ( translated in greek Αμήν), makes its first appearance in the Bible under the most solemn circumstances. When a husband accused his wife of adultery, and she protested her innocence, and she had not been caught in the act, the matter was settled by God under the test of bitter water (Numbers 5:12-31).

The woman was taken to the priest, and the priest put her under oath. She submitted to a ceremony in which she drank some water containing dust from the tabernacle floor. If she had committed adultery, she was be cursed with a wasting disease, but if she did not get sick, then she was proven innocent and her husband was proven wrong.

During the ceremony, when the priest pronounced the curse, the woman was required by God to say, "Amen, Amen". (Numbers 5:22). That is the first occurrence of the word in scripture. The Lord commands it to be said by a person who is yielding herself to examination by him in his presence.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 04:08 PM
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Jesus was referred to as Amun by the people. Amun was the protector of the needy. Amen is directly related to Amun as to meaning. It took me a lot of research to verify that.

Amen/Amun isn't really a god, it is a philosophy Amun Ra was a person who overlooked the people from the mountain/hill and made sure they were provided for. It is a title.

It takes a little research of the ancient languages to understand this correctly, at first I thought it was bull when I read it years ago. But these religions are not actually worshiping an Egyptian god. It goes much farther back than Egypt
edit on 29-5-2015 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 04:59 PM
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a reply to: bartholomeo




It's not pointless when there is another meaning to what most people are led to believe; however i can see the type of personality that you have and it's not that of a genius, but quite the opposite.



Thank you for insulting my intellect. I love your personality.

Would you kindly tell me if the following is correct?

Your overall opinion/belief is:

All people who believe in the God of the Bible are dumb idiots and mentally incapable of drawing a single conclusion on their own.

All geniuses are atheists.

Thanks so much!



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 05:22 PM
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I find it lame the opening post is only two lines.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 07:31 PM
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a reply to: WakeUpBeer
Yeah. Let's make the whole thread that way



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:38 PM
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a reply to: bartholomeo

Amen means "truly" in Aramaic/Hebrew.

Where Jesus says "verily, verily..." usually it is translated from "amen, amen..."

Just because one word means something in one language, doesn't mean it means that in all languages.

God is El. God is Most High (El Elyon). Jesus said, "Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?". The Heavenly Father is called El by Jesus, not an Egyptian god "Amen".



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:19 PM
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originally posted by: TruthLover557
a reply to: bartholomeo




It's not pointless when there is another meaning to what most people are led to believe; however i can see the type of personality that you have and it's not that of a genius, but quite the opposite.



Thank you for insulting my intellect. I love your personality.

Would you kindly tell me if the following is correct?

Your overall opinion/belief is:

All people who believe in the God of the Bible are dumb idiots and mentally incapable of drawing a single conclusion on their own.

All geniuses are atheists.

Thanks so much!





I'm trying to wake people up! and that includes you. However I'm not your baby sitter to spoon feed you the information; so stop, think, and answer the original OP question. Here I'll throw you a bone. Why is there obelisks in the Vatican, London, and Washington?



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:20 PM
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originally posted by: WakeUpBeer
I find it lame the opening post is only two lines.


It's an open ended question for you to research and answer. It's got lots of meat. Got get it!



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:21 PM
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originally posted by: rickymouse
Jesus was referred to as Amun by the people. Amun was the protector of the needy. Amen is directly related to Amun as to meaning. It took me a lot of research to verify that.

Amen/Amun isn't really a god, it is a philosophy Amun Ra was a person who overlooked the people from the mountain/hill and made sure they were provided for. It is a title.

It takes a little research of the ancient languages to understand this correctly, at first I thought it was bull when I read it years ago. But these religions are not actually worshiping an Egyptian god. It goes much farther back than Egypt


You are getting warm! Isn't it much better to find the info on your own than someone else telling it to you?



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 12:03 AM
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I did more research. It seems like the worship of Amun may be the first form of a one supreme God worship. Later, Akhenatan made Atenism, declaring Aten, the sun disc as the supreme God, to go against the worship of Amun but the religion didn't catch on. Some say the Hymn to Aten is similar to earlier hymns to Amun. Amun was called the champion of the poor and troubled.

Also very interesting that early monotheistic beliefs seem to be symbolized by the Sun.

A name for God in the Torah, Gospel, and Koran is EL The Merciful.

Jesus said in the Gospel, "Eli, Eli, lema sabachthani?", and Jesus gave a different view of God, more lovingly merciful and kind to all, the good and bad, who wants us to get along and be merciful to each other (Luke 6:35-36). In those verses he called God The Most High (El Elyon).

In Aramaic God is Elah, in Arabic Al ilah (or Allah). In Hebrew it would be El or Elohim.

In Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, the name of EL The Merciful is there; but yes, it's also true that all three pray and say "Amen" but in Semetic languages it means "truly". Except for the book of revelation which calls Jesus "The Amen", I don't think Amen is considered a divine name in the Torah or Gospel.




edit on 30-5-2015 by arpgme because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 12:09 AM
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a reply to: bartholomeo

It's very lazy and doesn't have any meat.

But maybe some are hungrier for one liners followed by being told to do their own research in subsequent posts, than I am.



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 03:33 AM
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a reply to: bartholomeo




I'm trying to wake people up! and that includes you. However I'm not your baby sitter to spoon feed you the information; so stop, think, and answer the original OP question. Here I'll throw you a bone. Why is there obelisks in the Vatican, London, and Washington?


Hey, wow, okay. Check your ego at the login screen next time and try to drop your habit of patronizing others. I already stopped, thought, and answered your OP (rhetorical) question. You responded by making a snide remark about my intellect. Fine. No hard feelings. I replied with a couple honest questions, which you refuse to even acknowledge, and you tell me you're not my babysitter and, like a dog, I need you to throw me a bone?!?!

No. That's rude and incredibly off-putting.

I am a WIDE AWAKE 29-year-old woman and I OFFICIALLY OPT OUT of all your lessons and lectures from this moment forward. You are not my teacher and I am not your student. You are not my master and you are not my babysitter. The fact that you see yourself as such will be your undoing. Good day, sir.



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 04:41 AM
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Have you ever heard of an "amen stake"? Hint: It has to do with tents. I didn't think so. Look it up. I'd school ya Bart, but it's so much more meaningful when ya look it up yourself.


a reply to: bartholomeo



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 08:34 AM
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a reply to: bartholomeo

Except the word Amen is Old English from the Latin amen, from the Ecclesiastical Greek amen, from the Hebrew word amen that is used adverbiablly as an expression of deep agreement. The Hebrew comes from the Semitic root a-m-n which means, "to be trustworthy, confirm, support."

Source: www.etymonline.com...

Simply has nothing to do with Amen, Amon, Amun, Ammon and Amounra. As you can see his named is spelled various ways, and there are no scholarly articles that support your claim.



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 12:20 PM
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originally posted by: bartholomeo

originally posted by: rickymouse
Jesus was referred to as Amun by the people. Amun was the protector of the needy. Amen is directly related to Amun as to meaning. It took me a lot of research to verify that.

Amen/Amun isn't really a god, it is a philosophy Amun Ra was a person who overlooked the people from the mountain/hill and made sure they were provided for. It is a title.

It takes a little research of the ancient languages to understand this correctly, at first I thought it was bull when I read it years ago. But these religions are not actually worshiping an Egyptian god. It goes much farther back than Egypt


You are getting warm! Isn't it much better to find the info on your own than someone else telling it to you?


Yup, when you research on your own you can also correctly apply it to other things. If you are taught a word means one thing, then applying it correctly to a different situation is nearly impossible sometimes.



posted on May, 30 2015 @ 12:29 PM
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originally posted by: JUhrman

originally posted by: bartholomeo
Amen was an egyptian God with extraterrestrial lineage. What are you guys doing saying his name everytime you end your prayers?


Why do you worship Roman and Germanic gods ?


Each time you say Tuesday you worship Tiw/Mars

Each time you say Wednesday you worship Wodan/Mercury

Each time you say Thursday you worship Thor/Jupiter

Each time you say Friday you worship Frig/Venus

Each time you say Saturday you worship Saturn



Stop worshipping Roman/Germanic gods


perhaps all those guys have been working together this whole time and "bad luck" is just them trying to very subtly remind us that we keep giving credit to the wrong dude.




posted on May, 30 2015 @ 12:32 PM
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originally posted by: JUhrman

originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: JUhrman

Wait a minute...are you saying that these gods from different cultures have comparable attributes and could be compared to each other?



/thread derailment



In that case, Germanic Gods have been Romanized by the Roman conquest, so it's exactly like I explained in my posts; similarities ad posteriori, after cultural domination.

Your claim that most/all gods from the cultures of the Mediterranean basin are inspired and borrowed from a predating common pantheon is unsubstantiated though.

It's like saying the Germanic gods were originally similar to Roman gods, which they weren't


what about enki/enlil? my understanding is that the sumerian/sanskrit mythos provided a great deal of inspiration for subsequent pantheons.



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