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Christians, Jews, and Muslims: Why Do You Worship An Egyptian God?

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posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:06 AM
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all those religions are bad Michael bay reboots of ancient Egyptian religion. there are many parallels that have been discussed at length here.




posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:12 AM
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originally posted by: SgtHamsandwich

originally posted by: Klassified
a reply to: SgtHamsandwich
Then blast the OP with truth and facts. Not confirmation bias and BS. Also, read my second post. Amen was an Egyptian deity. That the Hebrews may have had a long history with the Egyptians actually lends credence to what the OP says.

I do understand that Jews, Christians, and Islam use the word differently, but that doesn't change its origins.



A words origin, or a differnet origin of a word with the same spelling, does not change its context in which it's used. Especially a word that has been used in a certian context for 2000+ years and some yahoo comes along with some hurr durr BS trying to make a fool out of people.

I understand what you're saying, and I don't disagree the OP was goading, and could have made this a much less antagonistic thread. Nevertheless, the Abrahamic faiths need to be questioned and scrutinized just as ALL other ancient religions are. They are no less mythology, and no more legitimate than those that came before and after them. Though they would have us believe otherwise. I'm sure the Egyptians and others felt theirs was the only true religion as well, and would have been sorely offended at suggestions to the contrary.

edit on 5/29/2015 by Klassified because: eta



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:17 AM
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Spelling? Last I checked hieroglyphics, hebrew, and arabic do not have roman characters and the spelling is completely up to whoever was translating the text... Saying "Amen" is the same as English Amen because of the spelling or is different if the e is changed to a u completely misses the point that there is no "right" spelling in English. It's hieroglyphs and hebrew! A philologist could argue that Amun and Amen are related, and a historian might argue that they are not depending on archaeological evidence. Seems historians are not connecting the two (while they do connect things like the Epic of Gilgemish with Noah.) But also, Egypt tends to get unfairly downplayed as a source of origin for political reasons dating back many centuries so... I could see it both ways.. But it would still need to get argued historically and not on arbitrary English spelling.
edit on 29-5-2015 by AudioOne because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:21 AM
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a reply to: JUhrman

Wait a minute...are you saying that these gods from different cultures have comparable attributes and could be compared to each other?



/thread derailment



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:34 AM
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a reply to: bartholomeo

The English amen is a transliteration of the Hebrew amein, it means to acknowledge something that you believe is true. We do not worship an Egyptian god. Even if you could prove that the etymology comes from the Egyptian god, the definition is totally different.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:37 AM
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originally posted by: SlapMonkey
a reply to: JUhrman

Wait a minute...are you saying that these gods from different cultures have comparable attributes and could be compared to each other?



/thread derailment



In that case, Germanic Gods have been Romanized by the Roman conquest, so it's exactly like I explained in my posts; similarities ad posteriori, after cultural domination.

Your claim that most/all gods from the cultures of the Mediterranean basin are inspired and borrowed from a predating common pantheon is unsubstantiated though.

It's like saying the Germanic gods were originally similar to Roman gods, which they weren't

edit on 29-5-2015 by JUhrman because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 09:46 AM
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a reply to: JUhrman

I get that...I was just rib poking for fun.




posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:00 AM
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originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: bartholomeo
Amen was an egyptian God with extraterrestrial lineage. What are you guys doing saying his name everytime you end your prayers?
It is NOT Egyptian. Amen The Egyptian you are thinking of is Amun and that is just the pronunciation. Nothing to do with amen.


Have you ever stopped to think about whatever your your religious leaders feed you is actually true? I mean really think about that for a minute.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:04 AM
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originally posted by: TruthLover557
I think you know full and well they don't.

Next time, resist the pointless rhetorical question.


It's not pointless when there is another meaning to what most people are led to believe; however i can see the type of personality that you have and it's not that of a genius, but quite the opposite.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:07 AM
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originally posted by: reldra

originally posted by: and14263
a reply to: bartholomeo

Too add:

Christians, Jews, Muslims.... Just keep your religion to yourself and stop causing s**t all over the world in the name of your religion.

EDIT: To stay on topic... I always assumed it meant 'peace' or something.


It is an affirmation ie: so be it, truly, verily.


Religious leaders say that is what it means; however I trust smart people will question that assumption.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:09 AM
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Hey, so is "Christians, Jews, and Muslims: Why Do You Worship An Egyptian God?" a well known joke? ......... Wait ....... I know this one ..... it was a popular joke when I was young...

Q: Christians, Jews, and Muslims: Why Do You Worship An Egyptian God?

A: To get to the other side!

...
Or was that "why did the chicken cross the road?"
now I'm confused..
edit on 29-5-2015 by AudioOne because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:10 AM
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originally posted by: AudioOne
Spelling? Last I checked hieroglyphics, hebrew, and arabic do not have roman characters and the spelling is completely up to whoever was translating the text... Saying "Amen" is the same as English Amen because of the spelling or is different if the e is changed to a u completely misses the point that there is no "right" spelling in English. It's hieroglyphs and hebrew! A philologist could argue that Amun and Amen are related, and a historian might argue that they are not depending on archaeological evidence. Seems historians are not connecting the two (while they do connect things like the Epic of Gilgemish with Noah.) But also, Egypt tends to get unfairly downplayed as a source of origin for political reasons dating back many centuries so... I could see it both ways.. But it would still need to get argued historically and not on arbitrary English spelling.


Amen!



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:10 AM
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originally posted by: SgtHamsandwich
A quick Google search would have prevented you from sounding like an a**hat.



The word amen (/ˌɑːˈmɛn/ or /ˌeɪˈmɛn/; Hebrew: אָמֵן, Modern amen, Tiberian ʾāmēn; Greek: ἀμήν; Arabic: آمين‎‎, ʾāmīn ; "So be it; truly") is a declaration of affirmation[1][2] found in the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament. Its use in Judaism dates back to its earliest texts.[3] It has been generally adopted in Christian worship as a concluding word for prayers and hymns.[2] In Islam, it is the standard ending to Dua (supplication). Common English translations of the word amen include "verily" and "truly". It can also be used colloquially to express strong agreement,[2] as in, for instance, amen to that.[4]


Amen - Wiki

And yes, reldra was 100% correct. Amun is the Egyptian god, not Amen.

Amun - Wiki



Later on I will tell you why that is incorrect. You are the perfect example of how the sheep have led astray.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:13 AM
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originally posted by: rossacus
Someone feels dumb


There is nothing wrong with asking a legitimate question. Since you don't even know the answer to the question; I hope u have a nice day and that your God Amen blesses you.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:19 AM
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originally posted by: JUhrman

originally posted by: bartholomeo
Amen was an egyptian God with extraterrestrial lineage. What are you guys doing saying his name everytime you end your prayers?


Why do you worship Roman and Germanic gods ?


Each time you say Tuesday you worship Tiw/Mars

Each time you say Wednesday you worship Wodan/Mercury

Each time you say Thursday you worship Thor/Jupiter

Each time you say Friday you worship Frig/Venus

Each time you say Saturday you worship Saturn



Stop worshipping Roman/Germanic gods


There is a difference between a "prayer"where a man talks his most deepest feelings to an all powerful being, and "small talk" when one refers to the days of the week.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:30 AM
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originally posted by: bartholomeo
There is a difference between a "prayer"where a man talks his most deepest feelings to an all powerful being, and "small talk" when one refers to the days of the week.


There is no difference because in the mind of the prayer Amen doesn't mean "egyptian god" just like in your mind "Saturday" doesn't mean "the day of Saturn".


It's a prayer, what matters is the intended meaning, not the pronunciation, language used, correct spelling or whatever. You are just trying to bait Christians with your thread and this doesn't honor you. There is no way you seriously believe they pray an Egyptian god.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:36 AM
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Seriously?


2 pages of back and forth with no one correcting anyone to the fact that Amen is a Greek word that has travelled across the globe!



Carry on.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 10:46 AM
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a reply to: CharlieSpeirs

That's because it was imported into Greek from Semitic languages.

www.jewishencyclopedia.com...

From wiki "The usage of Amen, meaning "so be it", as found in the early scriptures of the Bible is said to be of Hebrew origin;[5][6] however, the basic triconsonantal root from which the word was derived is common to a number of Semitic Languages such as Aramaic or Syriac. The word was imported into the Greek of the early Church from Judaism.[1][7] From Greek, amen entered the other Western languages. According to a standard dictionary etymology, amen passed from Greek into Late Latin, and thence into English.[8] Rabbinic scholars from medieval France believed the standard Hebrew word for faith emuna comes from the root amen. Although in English transliteration they look different, they are both from the root aleph-mem-nun. That is, the Hebrew word amen derives from the same ancient triliteral Hebrew root as does the verb ʾāmán.[9]"

Carry On..

edit on 29-5-2015 by AudioOne because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 11:26 AM
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The full name is Amen-Ra. A son of E.a. from Sumerian times. Ra would be the Egyptian deity with the head of a falcon.



posted on May, 29 2015 @ 11:36 AM
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a reply to: CharlieSpeirs

This is ATS. It's what we do.

All hail Saturday!




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