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Old Faithful blowing black smoke !!!

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posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 10:03 PM
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originally posted by: ItVibrates
a reply to: hounddoghowlie
Na if its running rich that would be a more blueish smoke I think??? Either way, its time to call a Volvo mechanic... I mean volcano mechanic.
Blue smoke would be the result of oil getting into the chamber.
Black smoke is particulate matter from incomplete combustion of gasoline.
Diesel engines emit white smoke if the fuel isn't adequately atomized.
However, white smoke that doesn't linger in the air is usually water / coolant.




posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 10:12 PM
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Here is a vid from April 9th and apparently there is some type of gag order?




But then people taking pictures on the 10th show old faithful working. But there are those guys in the orange suit again too. Strange




yellowstone.net...
edit on 12-4-2015 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)

edit on 12-4-2015 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 10:30 PM
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originally posted by: Realtruth
A good friend of mine grew up near Yellowstone and he said all the video's he is looking at are disturbing.
I asked him if it was the black smoke and his reply was "yes, partly but what really worries me is that this time of year there should be lots of snow still on the ground."
I said. "How much?"
His reply was at least 5 to 7 feet.
Something is going on for sure.



Maybe in isolated parts of the back country on mountain peaks but not near Old Faithful, Mammoth , either of the Valleys or anywhere else in the main park. Starting with the 3 week of April and usually until around the first or second week of June the 5 major roads in the park open. Average snowfall is much lower than 5-7 feet with annual amounts fluctuating between 60-120 inches. Some years it's higher and some years it's lower. In the back country you can get double that amount in late Jan over over Feb..

This chart , directly off the Yellowstone page , gives a monthly breakdown.



The guys in the orange suits don't bother me as they just look like the standard geological teams I have seen out there 2 times before. Once at Old Faithful and once at Grand Prismatic. It's not surprising to me that their are geological teams doing work in a place like Yellowstone.

The black smoke is different but different doesn't always mean trouble. More info is needed there. Additionally anyone that has been to Yellowstone knows how frequently things happen there. A spring that I enjoyed going to on my first trip 10 years ago during June was gone my last trip. When I go there again this September I fully expect other things I enjoy to not be there while new features will.

That is the glory of Yellowstone, it's a living breathing geo-thermal wonderland.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 10:38 PM
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originally posted by: Realtruth
0th show old faithful working. But there are those guys in the orange suit again too. Strange


Why is it strange?

I could take you to 5 or 6 different locations in the main park that could have geological teams working at them, often trying to repair human damage but just as likely because of what Yellowwstone is.

You would be surprised at how idiotic tourists are in the park.
People trying to walk out towards springs, people trying to get close to bison (their are no buffalo in the park) , people littering, during the endless pull overs people trying to move out towards wildlife.

Maybe one of the most disturbingly idiot human things I have ever seen is during a one of my trips there we watched as a grizzly bear tracked across the Hayden Valley and a stupid family thought it would be exciting to try and feed the bear from their mini-van. Thankfully the rangers got there before anyone was killed.



posted on Apr, 12 2015 @ 10:45 PM
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originally posted by: ItVibrates
a reply to: hounddoghowlie
Na if its running rich that would be a more blueish smoke I think??? Either way, its time to call a Volvo mechanic... I mean volcano mechanic.


Black is rich, Blue smoke means your burning oil, white means your overheating as Yellowstone does every day lol. Black means a deer fell in the hole or we are all about to see the largest fireworks display in the recorded history of Modern Man.



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 01:10 AM
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a reply to: smirkley
I always felt like old faithful is alike a cannery in the mineshaft, which miners used to take with them when digging, if the bird suddentely dies, its way past high time to get out of the area.

Something may be going on, but even if it was, these things still take time to build up, it would need to be puffing more then a little black smoke before things really heat up. Supervolcanos like Yellowstone blow every hundred million years or so. I do believe it would be quite more noticeable before one blows, there would be more signs then a bit of black smoke.

But hey who know. I suppose we will see what becomes of this in the years down the road. Though its just as likely that nothing will, I mean what concerning the timelines involved in these things compared to the average human lifespan, its not even a drop in the bucket, the thing could be smoking black for generations and still nothing.

But then again.



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 01:24 AM
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a reply to: theabsolutetruth




Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN


But , what if normal in Yellowstones case equals bad .



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 08:56 AM
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originally posted by: opethPA

originally posted by: Realtruth
0th show old faithful working. But there are those guys in the orange suit again too. Strange


Why is it strange?



It's strange because all the snow is gone 5 to 7 feet to be exact, there have been men in orange suits concentrated in one area, and old faithful was blowing black smoke.


But then again it may just be a cycle that happens there every hundred years or so.



edit on 13-4-2015 by Realtruth because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 09:02 AM
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originally posted by: Realtruth
It's strange because all the snow is gone 5 to 7 feet to be exact, there have been men in orange suits concentrated in one area, and old faithful was blowing black smoke.
But then again it may just be a cycle that happens there every hundred years or so.


Except it's not strange because that 5 - 7 feet of snow is not an accurate baseline so the fact that it isn't there doesnt mean anything. In your earlier post talking about your friend you didn't say where in Yellowstone he claims their should be 5-7 feet of snow. Was he talking Mammoth, Lamar or Hayden Valley, Back Country areas?

Yes..Take a few trips there and at any one of multiple different geo-thermal locations you might see men\women in suits investigating things. That is normal and I have personally witnessed it on at least 2 of my trips there over the past 15 years.

The black smoke is something new but that doesn't have to mean something nefarious or horrible is going to happen. We need more info on it before I see any reason to get worried.



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 09:06 AM
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originally posted by: asmall89
a reply to: butcherguy



That's what I was afraid of. Lots of politicians and the elite have property in South America... it makes you wonder.


Good choice. Move away from one super volcano and move closer to the OTHER super volcano.

I believe the people in the orange suits might have been involved in this study:

www.nps.gov...
edit on 13-4-2015 by Junkheap because: I did something terrible.




posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 09:11 AM
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a reply to: opethPA

I'm a bit puzzled. You said:

Average snowfall is much lower than 5-7 feet with annual amounts fluctuating between 60-120 inches.


As there are 12 inches in 1 foot, then 5 feet is 60 inches and 10 feet is 120 inches. Even the chart you provide shows an average annual snowfall of 72.1 inches. That's just a tad over 6 feet. (72 inches.) So, why do you say that the average snowfall is much lower than 5-7 feet?



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 10:08 AM
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a reply to: smirkley

Your thread is funny... I like the references to carburetors myself, that was too cute.

Anyhow.. as for the rest.. since old faithful is water, sulfur water actually.. it might have something to do with this: ??



Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria produce effects similar to those of iron bacteria. They convert sulfide into sulfate, producing a dark slime that can clog plumbing and/or stain clothing. Blackening of water or dark slime coating the inside of toilet tanks may indicate a sulfur-oxidizing bacteria problem. Sulfur-oxidizing bacteria are less common than sulfur-reducing bacteria.

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edit on 13-4-2015 by OpinionatedB because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 10:27 AM
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a reply to: Realtruth

No gag order.. and they made sure to tell you well in advance...


From April 9 to 13, 2015, scientists will be using Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to map what lies below the ground around Old Faithful Geyser. With a technique that's similar to using ultrasound on a human body, the research will study shallow subsurface structures like the thickness of the hot spring deposits, fractures, vents and cavities.

The purpose of this study is to learn more about Old Faithful Geyser and improve protection of the natural processes associated with the geyser. This GPR study is a direct result of the 2014 United States Geological Survey report "Hydrogeology of the Old Faithful Area, Yellowstone National Park, Wyoming, and its Relevance to Natural Resources and Infrastructure" (pubs.usgs.gov...). The panel responsible for this report specifically mentioned the use of GPR as a technique that should be investigated for imaging shallow stratigraphy and structure in the Old Faithful area.

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And the reason for it is this:


The visualisations gained from this project will be used to create a diagram of the shallow subsurface in the Old Faithful mound and Split Cone areas for the general public. Images gathered during this study may be used in an upcoming National Geographic magazine article on Yellowstone National Park. Scientific, peer-review articles will be written discussing the technique and results including the location and depth of subsurface cavities and vents, their orientation, dimensions and connectivity, the depth of any local groundwater, and the vertical and lateral extent of any imaged shallow steam zones.

edit on 13-4-2015 by OpinionatedB because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 11:08 AM
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originally posted by: JustMike
a reply to: opethPA

I'm a bit puzzled. You said:

Average snowfall is much lower than 5-7 feet with annual amounts fluctuating between 60-120 inches.


As there are 12 inches in 1 foot, then 5 feet is 60 inches and 10 feet is 120 inches. Even the chart you provide shows an average annual snowfall of 72.1 inches. That's just a tad over 6 feet. (72 inches.) So, why do you say that the average snowfall is much lower than 5-7 feet?


Unless I read the poster who said the 5-7 thing wrong were they not talking about on the ground at once?
If that isn't the case then everything is normal.



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 02:17 PM
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a reply to: opethPA
Oh, I see what you were getting at now: the annual snowfall doesn't necessarily equate to accumulation (actual depth snow on the ground). And you're dead right. Not just from your own observations from being there, but the stats back you up.
West Yellowstone Monthly Climate Summary, 80 years of data 1924-2004. (The link takes you to the data page hosted by the Western Regional Climate Center in Nevada. It's a .edu site.)
The peak for average snow depth (in Feb & Mar) throughout that period was only 38 inches, way lower than the snowfall recorded.

As you've been to Yellowstone I bet a lot of members would be interested in any observations or impressions you have of the place. I sure am; it's one of my dreams to go there one day



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 02:56 PM
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Most of the Northwest has experienced snow falls of less than half normal this past winter. So, not only should most of the usual snow be melted by now there was probably less to melt this year in the first place. Interestingly, the region has received a large amount of rainfall so the total moisture that has fallen is normal.

There will probably be widespread drought this fall in the northwest due to low snowpack.



posted on Apr, 13 2015 @ 03:42 PM
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originally posted by: JustMike
The peak for average snow depth (in Feb & Mar) throughout that period was only 38 inches, way lower than the snowfall recorded.


Not to high-jack the OP too much but since you asked...

The thing about Yellowstone and really all of the surrounding areas is how you can get almost micro-climate type bursts of weather. it can be 70 degrees as you enter Yellowstone from GardinerMammoth (North Entrance) and 30 degrees and snowy as you hit certain areas just an hour later. I have stayed in Bozeman , about an 45 mins to an hour away, in June and gotten 10 inches of snow. I have also been on hikes around Lake Yellowstone in October where I had to dress for winter weather only to be able to take all my but my sweater off as I hit Old Faithful.

The thing for me about Yellowstone is once it gets inside you, it never leaves. =)

I now have my 5th trip planned and each trip we spend 7 days in it. Of those trips we have only done 1 back country hike and that barley crossed into the back country. Whatever you like, you can find it there..Massive wild life, scenery, water, hiking, night sky photography, danger and beauty. I have been to multiple other national parks and something about Yellowstone always draws me back. Maybe it is the size, the isolation, the wildlife, whatever..

I took this picture is from my last trip there 3 years ago and as a group of us lucky folks got to track a grizzly moving across the Yellowstone Bridge area...





edit on 13-4-2015 by opethPA because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 01:11 AM
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a reply to: Junkheap

Is there really any place on Earth that is not in proximity to a super volcano? In Asia you got one in Siberia and one in Japan

We still have much to learn about these Super Volcanos and I'm of the opinion that it is of a relatively small chance any go off in my life time. Still, if anything serious was happening at Yellowstone I doubt it would be published.



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 03:25 AM
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a reply to: opethPA

That picture is awsome.

I live about 5 or so hours away and have visited at least once a year sometimes twice a year since I moved out west about 8 years ago. And every single time we experience new treats. When you see a griz the first time it is heart pounding awsome. I have pictures now that are amazing such as a momma griz and two cubs no further than 50 feet away and staring right at me.

My wife and I have watched and hiked to many geysers and mud pots. The only thing I ever need to witness is Steamboat geyser.

Which brings me back to Old Faithful blowing black smoke.

Mammouth hot springs is drying up. I have pictures from the same spot that clearly show this change over 8 years. Steamboat geyser blowing in 2013 which was very rare and unexpected. The yellowstone lake tilting as the ground rises. And then the black smoke at old faithful.

Things are clearly changing in a relatively geological short time in Yellowstone.

And yes, Yellowstone has captured my heart forever.



posted on Apr, 14 2015 @ 03:28 AM
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originally posted by: Answer
First black smoke, and then...



Hey...the bit where i live looks like it made it through intact..Whoohoo!

Bad luck the rest of you!




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