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Giant asteroid 2014-YB35 to fly past Earth on Friday

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posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 04:17 PM
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So here's the summary

origin al article


A huge asteroid, categorised as “potentially hazardous” by Nasa, will hurtle past Earth tomorrow.
There is no need to panic however as the rock, named 2014-YB35, will be 2.8 million miles away from the earth – 11.7 times further away than the moon.

The asteroid will be travelling at more than 23,000mph and is thought to be around 1000 metres wide.

Nasa animation below shows the pathway of the asteroid as it looks to shave the earth.


So yeah, it's a pretty pwoerful Asteroid, it's destructive pwoer is of 1.6e21 joules, or roughly 15 million megatons according to some websites, so that thing is 3000 times more powerful than all the nuclear arsennal on Earth and if hit, this would be the ratius of destruction:



What's left from the article:


Although bigger, it will be further away from the last near miss in January when asteroid 2004 BL86 came within 1.2 million kilometres.

Nasa classifies 2014-YB35 as a 'Potentially Hazardous Asteroid' (PHAs). PHAs are asteroids that make close approaches to Earth, which Nasa can observe and learn from.

“By monitoring these PHAs and updating their orbits as new observations become available, we can better predict the close-approach statistics and thus their Earth-impact threat,” says Nasa. 

The asteroid was originally discovered by the Catalina Sky Survey at the University of Arizona.


Well, there's a very, very, very small chance of this thing getting captured by Earth gravity. But i don't think we should worry about, at all.



edit on 26-3-2015 by Frocharocha because: (no reason given)

edit on 26-3-2015 by Frocharocha because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 04:34 PM
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How small a chance?

It's 2.8 million miles away at it's closest, how could that possibly pose any threat?



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 04:38 PM
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originally posted by: Cobaltic1978
How small a chance?

It's 2.8 million miles away at it's closest, how could that possibly pose any threat?


It's a ridicullous small chance, but still there's always a chance.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 04:39 PM
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originally posted by: Frocharocha It's a ridicullous small chance, but still there's always a chance.



fingers crossed.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 04:45 PM
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So what would happen in that ration of destruction?



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 04:45 PM
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a reply to: Frocharocha

There's no chance at all, bit of sensationalism. This is the equivalent to throwing a rock and missing your target by 2 miles, and saying it was a 'near miss' when in reality it was not close at all. There's a greater risk of being impacted by the moon than this thing.
edit on 26/3/15 by SpongeBeard because: (no reason given)

edit on 26/3/15 by SpongeBeard because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 04:46 PM
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originally posted by: Frocharocha
Well, there's a very, very, very small chance of this thing getting captured by Earth gravity.

No, there isn't. Earth's gravity (and the gravity of the other planets) is already accounted for in the calculations.

There is absolutely no risk of impact. The uncertainty region is extremely small and doesn't come anywhere near earth.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 04:47 PM
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originally posted by: RoScoLaz4

originally posted by: Frocharocha It's a ridicullous small chance, but still there's always a chance.



fingers crossed.


Yeah, knock on wood, lucky horse shoe, lucky heather, rabbit's foot and all the other good luck charms and acts. We're going to need it!!



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 05:16 PM
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a reply to: SpongeBeard

No chance? Those 1000 injured Russians would disagree with you.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 05:16 PM
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There has been some fearmongering how it is "skimming past Earth". It goes almost 12 Lunar distances away from us at it's closest point. Surely that is "doomsday" asteroid, but there is absolutely zero change of hit.

But yeah, its large enough to destroy all the life on Earth by direct hit, and cause hundreds of years long nuclear winter.

There is also bigger one coming, 5381 Sekhmet, which is over 2km in diameter. And it may even have own moon. The asteroid will "pass" Earth on 17th of May. The distance is 62,3 LD.



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 05:30 PM
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originally posted by: Ultralight
a reply to: SpongeBeard

No chance? Those 1000 injured Russians would disagree with you.


Yea... what if it had a little brother or two that trailes it at distance that Earths (or any large body like Venus or just hit another large hazardous object) that changes its course over time and in 1000 years BAM!! Like some sort of Melancholia repeat only real?

Or what if aliens make it happen for alien reasons or simply because the experiment is over?

Ok... enough doomporn.

Seriously, I think there won't be anyone to dig us up in 1000 years anyway.

/shrug



posted on Mar, 26 2015 @ 08:03 PM
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originally posted by: Ultralight
a reply to: SpongeBeard

No chance? Those 1000 injured Russians would disagree with you.

We didn't know about the Chelyabinsk meteor, we know about this asteroid, we know its orbit, and we know there's no chance that it will hit earth anytime in the foreseeable future. Any other asteroid could hit at ANY time unannounced like Chelyabinsk, but that has nothing to do with this asteroid, which we know, and which presents no risk in our lifetimes.



posted on Mar, 27 2015 @ 03:54 AM
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Well, there's a very, very, very small chance of this thing getting captured by Earth gravity. But i don't think we should worry about, at all.


I wish that people wouldn't keep saying stuff like this. The gravitational forces of all eight major planets, Earth's Moon, and three asteroids (Ceres, Pallas and Vesta) are taken into account when the orbits of small asteroids and comets in the inner Solar System are computed. The Earth's "gravity well" has already been included in the calculations, so 2014 YB35 isn't going to suddenly "fall in" towards Earth.



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