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Nurse 'infected with Ebola' in Spain

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posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 05:39 PM
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a reply to: xavi1000

His condition is still critical it even states that in the article you posted?




posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 05:41 PM
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originally posted by: Vaxellion
a reply to: xavi1000

His condition is still critical it even states that in the article you posted?

Critical , but stable.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 05:46 PM
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for real.. you are a highly trained professional of a specialized clinic and a member of one particular unit that just treated an Ebola patient.. how do you manage to ignore you have flu symptoms for a full week straight after ??? this is bizarre...



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 06:08 PM
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originally posted by: windwaker
a reply to: Snarl

Yes. I have a gut feeling that the virus alters human behavior making them extremely social.


I don't know about that ... but they certainly get desperate. Desperate people 'do things' which fall far outside the scope of normal behavior.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 06:17 PM
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Something else to note - This woman is not even a regular nurse, but an auxiliary nurse. She should not have been let near the patient in the first place. "La auxiliar enfermeria" is Spanish for auxiliary nurse. Calling her a nurse is just a poor translation. It is possible that the regular professionals made a containment or protocol mistake and she was the one who is paying the price for it. She may not even have known she was exposed as a result.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 06:34 PM
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a reply to: texasgirl

There is a part of me saying that even if the Gov't/MSM did come out and say it was a Pandemic that they couldn't stop, truthfully, what could an individual do? I'm thinking that maybe this one is the one to keep hush-hush, since after all...no one is safe.

Panic would eventually set in. Even the most prepared would end up dying.

It would be the world of "The Walking Dead" for the most part. The immune and those afflicted.



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 07:06 PM
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originally posted by: chrismarco
a reply to: joho99

Uh boy...somebody was not following the rules when treating an ebola patient..


Hmmm, perhaps their rules are wrong?
I'm speculating It could indeed be airborne or passed in ways they just don't know, or, she was sloppy. Nancy the American was working in decontamination and got it. Surely she should have known the "rules".

Soon this virus will be all over the effing place!



posted on Oct, 6 2014 @ 10:18 PM
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I can't believe that they let her go about her normal routine when she was showing even a slight fever, that is a terrible mistake which im sure will have major repercussions. She was caring for a patient with Ebola then a fever starts to develop and they don't instantly quarantine her ? seriously?



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 03:58 AM
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a reply to: Shana91aus

I agree and wonder if we are doing the right thing for the millions 'at home' when we ship people back from Africa with the virus.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 04:51 AM
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She took care of both priests who died? I wonder which one she picked it up from. Yes, the 11 days is within the 7-21 day period, but Is it possible that it was from the first priest in August? That they are wrong about the infectious/contagious/latency period?
edit on 10/7/2014 by ~Lucidity because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 05:16 AM
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originally posted by: Shiloh7
a reply to: Shana91aus

I agree and wonder if we are doing the right thing for the millions 'at home' when we ship people back from Africa with the virus.


Well this has made me wonder the same! Considering this case demonstrates that even with all precautions taken and full hazmat gear the nurse still managed to get infected, yes it could have been at her own fault but even if so that just goes to show that yes human error can easilly happen with Ebola and any nurse/doctor etc could make this mistake, they are human after all and also that its a risk with each and every infected patient that they care for, and with each person they take to the US or wherever for treatment is another risk, people can mess up... Or it could mean something else entirely like it has mutated and become airbourne..



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 06:08 AM
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Consistently (in West Africa) and now in Spain, Nurses and doctors are being infected.

Looking at the news feeds etc, doctors in Africa seemed to be suited up fairly well:



Obviously this isn't the case for everyone, but now that someone in Spain has become infected..
Serious concerns now as to the validity of the CDC's statements. This is the largest Ebola Outbreak ever, its jumped continents and its taking everyone by surprise ergo: its beating our previous protocols somehow.

If a doctor or nurse in the US gets infected, then it will be panic stations. I cant imagine many doctors and nurses will be willing to treat people if they are now at risk when taking all precautions.

We're a whisker away from a starting sense of panic.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:29 AM
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a reply to: joho99

...how will this apply to the argument health workers in Africa caught it because of lack of equipment?


They're saying Spain wasn't properly prepared to handle Ebola, and the equipment was substandard. ...Parallels what US medical staff are saying - inadequate training, equipment.


Spanish nurse’s Ebola infection blamed on substandard equipment

Staff at Madrid’s Carlos III hospital say protective suits do not meet WHO standards as second nurse undergoes tests for virus

….El Mundo reported that it was the nurse who asked to be tested for Ebola, having to insist repeatedly on being tested before it was done on Monday.

While staff at the Alcorcón hospital were waiting for the test results, the nurse remained in a bed in the emergency room, separated only by curtains from other patients, hospital staff told El Mundo. Their version of events clashes with that of health authorities, who have said the patient was isolated from the first moment.

….In August, Spain became the first European country in the current, fast-spreading outbreak to evacuate patients for treatment. The decision prompted concern among health professionals, who said Spanish hospitals were not adequately equipped to handle Ebola.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:32 AM
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a reply to: soficrow
I am not surprised by the answer that they gave.

It still doesn't do much for the argument that the disease is not easily transmitted, does it?



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:34 AM
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It amazes me they're allowing Duncan's "step daughter" to return to work as a nursing assistant. Her husband has been given the all-clear to return to work too. What's up with that? The incubation period isn't over yet.

I'm not sure how much interaction a nursing assistant has with a patient (compared to an RN), but I was under the impression that the patient in Spain was a nursing assistant as well.

Regardless of what one may think of the capability of hospitals in Spain to face Ebola, we know this: Dr. Brantly, for example, an American physician well-versed in how to handle such cases got sick anyway.

We are doomed.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 08:57 AM
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Here's some lousy news: the husband of the Ebola nurse in Spain, along with three others, are now in hospital because she complained about symptoms ONE WEEK ago and was ignored.

Sounds like Dallas all over again. This is horrid.

www.dailymail.co.uk... acted-virus.html



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:04 AM
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The woman is receiving blood serum from Ebola survivor Paciencia Melgar as treatment, also she was transferred from Alcorcon Hospital to Carlos III.
edit on 7-10-2014 by Indigent because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:07 AM
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a reply to: dianajune

I`m not surprised with Spain its horrible economic condition them having not the proper equipment.

With France being France you might also wonder if they are prepared enough.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:21 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

I call BS on the substandard equipment accusation. Supposedly the employees claimed the WHO requires a breathing apparatus and wouldn't agree with the use of duct tape at the sleeve and glove area.

So I quickly looked this up.

Apparently, the WHO requires and contemplates neither.

WHO EBOLA PPE POSTER.

Moreover, this nurse only saw the infected patient twice.

Something is up with the mode of transmission.

Besides, the CDC keeps saying how hard it is to catch this thing. But the fact remains, people are getting sick even when extraordinary measures are taken to prevent infection.

Wake up people.



posted on Oct, 7 2014 @ 09:23 AM
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a reply to: soficrow

Annoying that they are still saying things like this.

The regional director of the WHO in Europe said Ebola would “most likely” spread but the continent was well prepared to control it.


In a story with evidence to the contrary.

I do not hold out much hope that they will be able to contain it if they have 100 to care for let alone 1000




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