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Ebola Patient in Atlanta Hospital

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posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:08 PM
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a reply to: Destinyone

That brings up a whole different set of questions....indeed, who SHOULD get the serum? On the one hand, we have the country of origin of these two victims providing an extremely expensive cure for its own victims (because, dude, those two doses must have been worth millions if they're the only two, they're worth all of the R&D that was put into them) and then we have the altruistic question of "whose life is worth more than anyone's else's?" Then we run into issues about historical oppression, economic disadvantage, economic warfare, exploitation of resources, etc etc etc. In my "altruistic" hat I'm gonna answer that it should be a blind lottery as to who gets the serum. In my "'Murica, eff yeah" hat, I'm gonna answer "me and mine before all others." I'm sure that opinion would strengthen if "me or mine" actually had the disease.

Big questions, worthy of another thread, indeed. HUGE ethical questions that need to be answered soon, otherwise we have trouble on our hands.




posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:08 PM
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originally posted by: FraggleRock
a reply to: kruphix

Maybe you could ask the CDC. Ask them if Ebola is so hard to get and apparently isn't so bad why they would be taking so many precautions not to let it spread. Why are they at airports looking for possible signs of it? They've never done that for the flu that I know of. So if Ebola is such a walk in the park, why are the professionals treating it as if it were a legitimate disease?


I never claimed it was a walk in the park.

Just trying to understand the fear in people who are not in West Africa at this time.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:11 PM
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originally posted by: kruphix

originally posted by: FraggleRock
a reply to: kruphix

Maybe you could ask the CDC. Ask them if Ebola is so hard to get and apparently isn't so bad why they would be taking so many precautions not to let it spread. Why are they at airports looking for possible signs of it? They've never done that for the flu that I know of. So if Ebola is such a walk in the park, why are the professionals treating it as if it were a legitimate disease?


I never claimed it was a walk in the park.

Just trying to understand the fear in people who are not in West Africa at this time.


Easy question! Answer: if it can spread in Africa, it can spread in the US with so many traveling visitors to West Africa.

The end!



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:14 PM
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originally posted by: Zebra501
Wait a minute....so you can't get infected secretions from a cough or a sneeze?!?


And sweat. Think about that. Sweaty palms, brushing against someone's arm who is sweating...



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:15 PM
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a reply to: loam

I think you are trying to post this, since you have posted it several times in one version or another...

www.cdc.gov...

Definition:

I.B.3.b. Droplet transmission Droplet transmission is, technically, a form of contact transmission, and some infectious agents transmitted by the droplet route also may be transmitted by the direct and indirect contact routes. However, in contrast to contact transmission, respiratory droplets carrying infectious pathogens transmit infection when they travel directly from the respiratory tract of the infectious individual to susceptible mucosal surfaces of the recipient, generally over short distances...

edit on 6-8-2014 by raymundoko because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:15 PM
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Last test. Guess I cant post until it's fixed.
edit on 6-8-2014 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:16 PM
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It seems the UK is taking this outbreak seriously as British Airways has suspended flights to Sierra Leone and Liberia.

Ebola outbreak: BA suspends flights to Sierra Leone and Liberia over virus


It follows warnings at the weekend from the World Health Organisation that the outbreak, which has killed nearly 900 people since February, was spreading faster than it could be controlled.

A statement from British Airways sent to travel companies said: “British Airways services from London Heathrow to Freetown and Monrovia will be temporarily suspended from tomorrow, 6 August until 31 August 2014, due to the deteriorating public health situation in both countries.”



It seems there are still other carriers operating to these countries. I don't understand why we're still allowing flights into the U.S. from the hot zone countries. It's just asking for trouble.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:17 PM
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a reply to: kruphix

Well I happen to live in a state that has one of the largest West African, specifically Liberian, populations outside of those respective countries. In fact, Mr. Sawyer was from the city that I currently live. So with the possibility of so many travelers specifically from that region coming to town, how could I not be even the slightest bit concerned?



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:19 PM
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a reply to: raymundoko

www.cdc.gov...

Safe zone:

The maximum distance for droplet transmission is currently unresolved, although pathogens transmitted by the droplet route have not been transmitted through the air over long distances. Historically, the area of defined risk has been a distance of



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:20 PM
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originally posted by: loam
Last test. Guess I cant post until it's fixed.


Let's define that symbol: Micrometer:


The micrometre (International spelling as used by the International Bureau of Weights and Measures;[1] SI symbol: µm) or micrometer (American spelling), also commonly known as a micron, is an SI derived unit of length equaling 1×10−6 of a metre (SI standard prefix "micro-" = 10−6); that is, one millionth of a metre (or one thousandth of a millimetre, 0.001 mm, or about 0.000039 inch).[1] The symbol µm is sometimes rendered as um if the symbol µ cannot be used, or if the writer is not aware of the distinction.


Not a reasonable exam-length, not a room, literally right on top of someone.

(And dude, your posts are coming through for us, don't know why you can't see them, but you keep deleteing good posts because you have some tech issue, we can see them, keep posting!)
edit on 6-8-2014 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:21 PM
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a reply to: 00nunya00

You really have to wait for my full post. I explain in full detail that issue.

They say they are trying to fix my posting issue.

ETA:

You can see my full posts?

Ok can you quote my last line on the next post?
edit on 6-8-2014 by loam because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: raymundoko

Here is what I see as the problem. There is in fact a distinction between droplet transmission and airborne transmission. In fact, the CDC describes droplet transmission as follows:




I.B.3.b. Droplet transmission:

Droplet transmission is, technically, a form of contact transmission, and some infectious agents transmitted by the droplet route also may be transmitted by the direct and indirect contact routes.

...

The maximum distance for droplet transmission is currently unresolved, although pathogens transmitted by the droplet route have not been transmitted through the air over long distances, in contrast to the airborne pathogens discussed below. Historically, the area of defined risk has been a distance of 5 μm in size. Droplet nuclei, particles arising from desiccation of suspended droplets, have been associated with airborne transmission and defined as



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:26 PM
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Quote not working, see post below
edit on 6-8-2014 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:27 PM
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I saw some headline about Africans pleading for the ''ebola drug'' that is being given to ''ebola'' infected Americans.

And now, now people, you know why the entire theatrical Media charade is being played out on headline news. This is exactly what the West wants.... Africans pleading for help from the West.

The way the Media manipulates the public is so obvious. The African continent is ripe for the picking. Oh, and early August is the common Lughnasadh. Hmmm.....

Hmmm?



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:27 PM
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a reply to: 00nunya00

From your source (don't know why you cut off the length definition, but here it is



Historically, the area of defined risk has been a distance of less than)3 feet around the patient and is based on epidemiologic and simulated studies of selected infections


Three feet (or less). Three feet. How many of you NYCers, or Chicagoans, LAians or any other public-transit-users have been closer than three feet to your traveling companions? Hell, that defines your private car pool. :/
edit on 6-8-2014 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-8-2014 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:28 PM
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a reply to: loam

Your quote is breaking because of the less than and greater than symbols.

For everyone interested this is the link he is pulling the quote from:

www.cdc.gov...

As you can see the text in his quote does not in any way match the text from the CDC. Hopefully it is a copy/paste issue...

His post:

Historically, the area of defined risk has been a distance of 5 μm in size.


CDC Site

Historically, the area of defined risk has been a distance of less than 3 feet around the patient


Those lines are separated by several paragraphs in the link.
edit on 6-8-2014 by raymundoko because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:29 PM
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a reply to: 00nunya00

That's a less than symbol...three feet or less.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:30 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
a reply to: 00nunya00

That's a less than symbol...three feet or less.


Yeah, I was trying to deal with the fact that the symbol cut off the quote. Thanks, though, I already edited it.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:31 PM
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originally posted by: raymundoko
a reply to: 00nunya00

That's a less than symbol...three feet or less.


So. Three feet or less transmits it even via accepted and proven routes. What say you? Does the subway look safe now?



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:34 PM
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a reply to: raymundoko

First, let's be clear about something. My full post is either not posting or is not visible to me.

I can't tell what you see. What are you saying I'm misposting about?



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