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Ebola Patient in Atlanta Hospital

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posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:59 PM
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a reply to: 00nunya00

Yes, you could probably be within 6 feet of an Ebola victim and not catch anything from breathing the same air...Why aren't you understanding how difficult it is for this disease to spread. Even in HEAVILY POPULATED areas with virtually no medical infrastructure there have only been 900~ deaths (let's say 1500 for good measure)...

Now would you WANT to be within 6 feet of an Ebola carrier? No, I have projectile vomited that far before...




posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 03:59 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:01 PM
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originally posted by: loam
a reply to: 00nunya00

You'll need to eliminate the first and last quote brackets for it to show right.

I know, I'm trying, going back to compare your PM with the quote, it's coming along. I'm sorry. :/ Dang PM removes all the formatting.

ETA: is the very last post of your PM correct? Let me know if I missed anything. I hate the new formatting. :/
edit on 6-8-2014 by 00nunya00 because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:08 PM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:09 PM
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a reply to: 00nunya00

Thanks for trying.

I should just step back until they fix my issue.




posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:12 PM
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originally posted by: 00nunya00

originally posted by: raymundoko
a reply to: 00nunya00

That's a less than symbol...three feet or less.


So. Three feet or less transmits it even via accepted and proven routes. What say you? Does the subway look safe now?


Yes.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:13 PM
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a reply to: loam

Tell you what, go ahead and post your posts, and I will send you screenshots of your posts to be sure they're correct via email. PM your email, cool?



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:13 PM
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In regards to the serum. Unfortunately it cant be rolled out to Africa. Why? Cause for once big evil Pharma was not involved.

Due to the rarity of the diseases, the cost of handling cat 4 organisms and the fact that most who got it were poor, not much has been done in the private sector with the big players. Theres been some research especially with a few small company's but no large scale projects.

Most Ebola R&D has been been confined to government agency's. They are not equipped for large scale manufacturing processes. So they are pretty much telling the truth there was only 2 doses.

Now there may be profit in it, big players like Monsanto are getting involved in a bigger way. But from working in R&D in the private sector I can tell going from R&D to manufacturing is not a simple process. You have to scale the process up ( easier said than done as problems can develop in the scale up that ruins the product) and staff need training.
edit on 6-8-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)

edit on 6-8-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:15 PM
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CNN just reported -- "CDC Raises Ebola Response to Highest Level" -- It is now a level 1 Alert.


edit on Wed16Wed, 06 Aug 2014 16:16:52 -05003114Wed by DirtyD because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:16 PM
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originally posted by: 00nunya00
a reply to: Destinyone

That brings up a whole different set of questions....indeed, who SHOULD get the serum? On the one hand, we have the country of origin of these two victims providing an extremely expensive cure for its own victims (because, dude, those two doses must have been worth millions if they're the only two, they're worth all of the R&D that was put into them) and then we have the altruistic question of "whose life is worth more than anyone's else's?" Then we run into issues about historical oppression, economic disadvantage, economic warfare, exploitation of resources, etc etc etc. In my "altruistic" hat I'm gonna answer that it should be a blind lottery as to who gets the serum. In my "'Murica, eff yeah" hat, I'm gonna answer "me and mine before all others." I'm sure that opinion would strengthen if "me or mine" actually had the disease.

Big questions, worthy of another thread, indeed. HUGE ethical questions that need to be answered soon, otherwise we have trouble on our hands.


Exactly! It's just now starting to heat up in the MSM...it will get very ugly methinks. I don't want to start another thread on this new subject. Too much trouble dealing with some posters. If anyone here wants to start it, go for it. Please leave a link to your new thread here for reference.

One thing I did NOT know. In this article it claims Nancy the assistant received TWO doses of zmapp.


The ongoing West African Ebola outbreak has, after five months, finally captured global attention, in large part because in late July, three Americans contracted the virus. One, Liberian-American Patrick Sawyer, died in Lagos after flying from Togo. The other two U.S. citizens are health workers at a clinic in Liberia’s capital, Monrovia, who have since been transported for advanced care at Emory Hospital in Atlanta.

Monday brought news that to many seemed miraculous: the Americans being treated at Emory seemed to have been revived – and possibly saved – from Ebola thanks to an experimental serum, ZMapp, that was secretly transported to their bedsides in Monrovia. Dr. Kent Brantly, who had sensed that he was in the end stages of Ebola and about to die when he ingested the serum, was so much improved that he was able to walk from his ambulance into Emory with only minimal assistance. Missionary Nancy Writebol’s symptoms also improved, although it took two doses of ZMapp for her to experience improvement, whereas Brantly only required one.

The news of a possible cure for Ebola is heartening, but it left many observers with mixed reactions. Why were Brantly and Writebol the only Ebola patients to receive ZMapp? The optics of the situation were already bad enough: at great expense, two white Americans were whisked away to safety and a level of health care that simply cannot be provided on the fly in a Liberian hospital. The black Liberians they had been treating were left to see whether fate would save or kill them under the same substandard health care system they have always lived under.www.washingtonpost.com...


As ebola spreads to more places globally...this will become a huge issue.

Des



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:17 PM
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originally posted by: crazyewok
In regards to the serum. Unfortunately it cant be rolled out to Africa. Why? Cause for once big evil Pharma was not involved.

Due to the rarity of the diseases, the cost of handling cat 4 organisms and the fact that most who got it were poor, not much has been done in the private sector.

Most Ebola R&D has been been confined to government agency's. They are not equipped for large scale manufacturing processes. So they are pretty much telling the truth there was only 2 doses.

Now there may be profit in it, big players like Monsanto are getting involved in a bigger way. But from working in R&D in the private sector I can tell going from R&D to manufacturing is not a simple process. You have to scale the process up ( easier said than done as problems can develop in the scale up that ruins the product) and staff need training.


Exactly, especially when they have to insert it into already-growing tobacco plants to replicate the antibodies, then wait another 2-3 weeks to extract it. They didn't have a ton of it sitting around on a shelf, and an antibody serum has a shelf-life. Not a conspiracy, just the facts of life, unfortunately. :/ Star Trek replicator machine: Make It So! lol


(post by paxnatus removed for a manners violation)

posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:20 PM
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originally posted by: DirtyD
CNN just reported -- "CDC Raises Ebola Response to Highest Level" -- It is now a level 1 Alert.



This leads me to believe, they have more infected people, than we are hearing about. Raising the level alert was not done on a whim.

Des



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:20 PM
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a reply to: DirtyD

Do you have a link?



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:21 PM
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originally posted by: Destinyone
One thing I did NOT know. In this article it claims Nancy the assistant received TWO doses of zmapp.


That's what I understood as well. The Dr. received blood from an ex-patient he helped recover and a dose of ZMapp. Nancy received 2 in Africa prior to coming to the states and Dr. Gupta on CNN just reported that she was scheduled for a 3rd dose today, but did not know if that had happened yet.



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:21 PM
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a reply to: Destinyone

WHOA!!!! Now from one dose and a transfusion, to two doses and recovery, now to THREE doses! That's getting fishy. WTF? So, how many doses do they have? 10? 100? 1,000? What are they waiting for, they have a willing an excusably-risky test sample to try this on, I really don't think anyone dying of ebola is going to care about the risks! I'd live with a third arm if it mean I was cured of ebola. Dang. Good find!



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:25 PM
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originally posted by: MyMindIsMyOwn

originally posted by: Destinyone
One thing I did NOT know. In this article it claims Nancy the assistant received TWO doses of zmapp.


That's what I understood as well. The Dr. received blood from an ex-patient he helped recover and a dose of ZMapp. Nancy received 2 in Africa prior to coming to the states and Dr. Gupta on CNN just reported that she was scheduled for a 3rd dose today, but did not know if that had happened yet.


A third dose? Seriously? Please link? This is ridiculous now. How many are they hiding?



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:25 PM
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originally posted by: 00nunya00
a reply to: Destinyone

WHOA!!!! Now from one dose and a transfusion, to two doses and recovery, now to THREE doses! That's getting fishy. WTF? So, how many doses do they have? 10? 100? 1,000? What are they waiting for, they have a willing an excusably-risky test sample to try this on, I really don't think anyone dying of ebola is going to care about the risks! I'd live with a third arm if it mean I was cured of ebola. Dang. Good find!


It may be a case of one course of treatment split into multiple doses. So there is only enough for a couple of people but the treatments for those few are split over periods of time.

Plus as this is a new treatment there is some ambiguity on how much is needed to clear the infection. So there may only be enough for 2 people or they may be enough for a few dozen, they don't have any idea yet to how much is needed.



edit on 6-8-2014 by crazyewok because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:27 PM
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****testing post on ipad **** Still not working...

a reply to: raymundoko

Here is what I see as the problem. There is in fact a distinction between droplet transmission and airborne transmission. In fact, the CDC describes droplet transmission as follows:




I.B.3.b. Droplet transmission:

Droplet transmission is, technically, a form of contact transmission, and some infectious agents transmitted by the droplet route also may be transmitted by the direct and indirect contact routes.

...

The maximum distance for droplet transmission is currently unresolved, although pathogens transmitted by the droplet route have not been transmitted through the air over long distances, in contrast to the airborne pathogens discussed below. Historically, the area of defined risk has been a distance of 5 μm in size. Droplet nuclei, particles arising from desiccation of suspended droplets, have been associated with airborne transmission and defined as



posted on Aug, 6 2014 @ 04:28 PM
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originally posted by: crazyewok

originally posted by: 00nunya00
a reply to: Destinyone

WHOA!!!! Now from one dose and a transfusion, to two doses and recovery, now to THREE doses! That's getting fishy. WTF? So, how many doses do they have? 10? 100? 1,000? What are they waiting for, they have a willing an excusably-risky test sample to try this on, I really don't think anyone dying of ebola is going to care about the risks! I'd live with a third arm if it mean I was cured of ebola. Dang. Good find!


It may be a case of one course of treatment split into multiple doses. So there is only enough for a couple of people but the treatments for those few are split over periods of time.

Plus as this is a new treatment there is some ambiguity on how much is needed to clear the infection. So there may only be enough for 2 people or they may be enough for a few dozen, they don't have any idea yet to how much is needed.




Hmmm, good point, I wonder if they split Brantley's dose? Do we have any historical media references to which was the worse-off at first? When did each catch the disease? I know Brantley asked for his dose first, was he the first infected?



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