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crowd source! Welding question.

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posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 02:25 AM
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My supervisor broke off a piece to this 388 dollar squeegee assembly for a 3400 st advance ride along scrubber.

Is it possible to have this welded back on?

Appears to be aluminum alloy.
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edit on 6292014 by GiulXainx because: (no reason given)




posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 02:38 AM
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a reply to: GiulXainx

Yes. Ease up on the washing floors. If you cannot find someone to weld aluminium you could swap out the piece with something stronger.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 02:40 AM
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What a poorly made POS.

Where was it made?

I will leave the answer to an expert. I would suggest you cross your fingers.

P



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 02:56 AM
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a reply to: staple

I actually snapped it pff trying to tighten up the bolt. I guess I am stronger than I once thought.




posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 02:58 AM
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To me it looks like a piece of poorly cast steel. If it's aluminum you can get it mended, but it will be for a cost. Either way ( steel or aluminum) it's a hefty price. Can you get the money back on the original purchase?



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 02:58 AM
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a reply to: GiulXainx

Its called tig welding and could weld that back together. The questionable part about your fracture is it is to cast aluminum and at a high stress point. Welding cast aluminum is difficult because the metal contains impurities.

Should cost less than replacing the thing. May not last long.

Letting experts let you know.

Welding cast aluminum



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 03:03 AM
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a reply to: randomtangentsrme

Does not look like cast steel, but definitely cast. Looks to me like very poor quality and a blend of Aluminium and something else. A cheap way to produce a part that was always liable to break.

Suggest you do a search with make / model and the search term 'known issues.'

If that is a blend of metals it likely cannot be welded. You may be able to drill it out and glue / bolt it back on. I think you need to take the piece to a specialist and ask. The photo does not tell us what the composition is.

P



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 03:13 AM
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I figured it would be some type of alluminum only because of the bubbles, and integrity of the metal. And how easy it was to snap it off.

Thanks for the replies. Tig welding it is.

I am not sure what company made this pos because I couldn't even find a serial number for the thing. Searching online advance has the part at 388.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 03:18 AM
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nah... dont think you can weld that.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 03:34 AM
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a reply to: GiulXainx

I'd suggest grind both sides of the break. Tap both sides and insert a bit of high tensile threaded rod. Tig Weld. It looks like white metal to me so I wouldn't be expecting too much strength from the stitch up.

Kind Regards
Myselfaswell



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 05:09 AM
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a reply to: myselfaswell

I had this same idea in my head an hour ago. Drill a small hole in each side and stick something in it, then just beat the thing in with a hammer.... but then again.... this obviously looks a lot like aluminum. Soft core due to bubbles... then there is the issue with immense pressure being applied to push the rubber against that wall. I think welding is the only option in fear of piercing the piece straight through.

I have tried this before and I can tell ya this much.... it doesn't work like wood does. Metal is special....



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 06:40 AM
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a reply to: GiulXainx

It is worth the try, but be sure to chamfer the edges around the break, remove all the plastic, Aluminum is a great heat sink, by the time you got it welded the plastic would need replaced. Also preheat the entire part before welding. If you have a heliarc run it on AC and give it a go, the worst that could happen is you have to replace it anyway. Just be sure to take off the plastic parts.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 07:33 AM
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a reply to: GiulXainx

Sans welding,I would clamp the piece into position and drill and tap the hole from the backside as close to the meatiest part of the piece. Use a 5/16 flat head machine screw. The irregularities in the break should keep it from spinning. You could then cover the break with an epoxy to reinforce.


edit on 29-6-2014 by Justacasualobserver because: (no reason given)



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 08:03 AM
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It's hard to see on those picks how large and complexly shaped the piece is. But one idea would be to take it to a machine shop and have that component machined out of billet aluminum. Could get pretty pricey and exceed the replacement cost though. But it would be stronger than the original no doubt



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 01:34 PM
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a reply to: GiulXainx

Any tig or wire feed welder will weld the broken part.



posted on Jun, 29 2014 @ 01:40 PM
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Wow. Thanks everyone. Except my other supervisor wants to use his blow torch.... I told him we need to try a tig weld... but he thinks he can get it with just his blow torch. So today is going to be fun.......



posted on Jun, 30 2014 @ 05:46 AM
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a reply to: GiulXainx

sounds like it die cast in which case it cant be welded. its rubbish material. Di-cast is the dregs that are leftover from aluminum pouring, the crap in the bottom is simply poured into a mould. Its rubbish



posted on Jul, 1 2014 @ 05:14 AM
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a reply to: learnatic

Die cast? Well it was really easy breaking it. I was tightening the bolt you see on there against a metal strap to hold the rubber against the wall. And.... I don't know how much torque I put in but.... it felt like I was.... stirring up pizza sauce that had too much water in it. If that is true.... welll #. We will be down a scrubber.... thanks for everyone's input.



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