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"Highway robbery". Police seize $50,000 via asset forfeiture "laws".

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posted on May, 1 2014 @ 11:05 PM
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originally posted by: DerbyGawker
ditto, there's no point in discussing an alternative view with you.


firstly, i wasn't talking to you.

secondly, i am perfectly capable of discussing anything, so don't go trying to paint me as unreasonable.

and lastly, in case you have a problem with reading comprehension, what i said to him/her was of a consolatory nature....as in "i get where you're coming from, i understand how you feel"...i was showing empathy, and compassion...there's no sense in trying to tell someone that the way they feel, after having gone through something that traumatic, is unjustified. what happened to them has shaped their perception of law enforcement, what possible good could come from telling them they have no business or right feeling that way, after having gone through something like that?

what is wrong with you?




posted on May, 1 2014 @ 11:25 PM
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a reply to: Daedalus

Maybe I had a traumatic experience with people on a forum and I choose not to believe peoples personal accounts when they use said account to disbelieve reality.

I've had terrible experiences with LEOs and positive ones. Just because some can and do abuse their authority doesn't mean you don't have the right to defend yourself. Which was my point to him, rights only extend as far as you're willing to assert and defend them.

If you're unwilling or incapable of doing so, you're technically a ward and as such, they may exert control over you.

His assertion that you must obey unlawful orders because of the simple fact an officer gave them makes the[m] lawful[,] is absurd.

EDIT: [edited for spelling/clarity]
edit on 1-5-2014 by DerbyGawker because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 11:41 PM
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originally posted by: DerbyGawker
a reply to: Daedalus

Maybe I had a traumatic experience with people on a forum and I choose not to believe peoples personal accounts when they use said account to disbelieve reality.

I've had terrible experiences with LEOs and positive ones. Just because some can and do abuse their authority doesn't mean you don't have the right to defend yourself. Which was my point to him, rights only extend as far as you're willing to assert and defend them.

If you're unwilling or incapable of doing so, you're technically a ward and as such, they may exert control over you.

His assertion that you must obey unlawful orders because of the simple fact an officer gave them makes the lawful is absurd.



i agree that cops are not gods, and you don't hafta do whatever they say, simply because they say to do it..

i believe he/she is wrong, in his/her assertion that we have no rights in an encounter with law enforcement...but from that person's perspective, after having been raided for a BS reason, they are justified in that opinion...if the police can get away with that, the law means nothing.

i must admit, i'm a bit confused....my reply to you was prompted by your reply to a piece of what i'd said to another member...it looked to me as if you were trying to paint me as unreasonable, and incapable of discussing an alternative viewpoint, to the point where doing so would be a "waste of time"...was it your intent to pick a fight with me, or to challenge the assertions/views of the other poster?



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 11:44 PM
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You have the right to remain silent.

You have the right to an attorney.

Your money has absolutely no rights at all.

Welcome to the world of civil forfeiture, where your money is literally presumed guilty until proven innocent. One of the greatest scams known to man and it's dis-serving plenty, daily.



posted on May, 1 2014 @ 11:51 PM
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a reply to: Daedalus

my apologies, I knew you were being empathetic.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 05:01 AM
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a reply to: gladtobehere

Isn't it strange that the cop in this picture is smiling like he just won a prize or something? Goes through a person's car with seemingly no reason whatsoever and seizes a large amount of money then has the nerve to say "I don't have to explain it to you". Instead of, you know, proper protocols. What a chump.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 05:03 AM
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originally posted by: Wrabbit2000
You have the right to remain silent.

You have the right to an attorney.

Your money has absolutely no rights at all.

Welcome to the world of civil forfeiture, where your money is literally presumed guilty until proven innocent. One of the greatest scams known to man and it's dis-serving plenty, daily.


Hard to believe our founding fathers were the ones that introduced the concept to the US isn't it? All done for political expediency, it's so much easier to charge property with a crime than a person. It wasn't until recently though that the group that seized the funds was the group that got to keep the money. That's when the real corruption started.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 05:39 AM
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Here's some advice from a lawyer on how to deal with police stops:


In a police encounter these rules will help protect your civil rights and improve your chances of driving or walking away safely.
(Only exceptions are border searches and airport searches.)

1) Keep Private Items Out of View
This is common sense: Always keep any private items that you don't want others to see out of sight. Legally speaking, police do not need a search warrant in order to confiscate any illegal items that are in plain view.

2) Be Courteous & Non-Confrontational
The first thing you should say to the officer is, "Hello officer. Can you tell me why I am being stopped?" The officer may give you a hard time or say, "Why do you think I stopped you?" Tell the officer you don't know. Most importantly, do not apologize after you get stopped, because that can be considered an admission of guilt and could be used against you later in court.
Show your identification if it's requested. Be respectful and non-confrontational. Refer to the police as "Sir," "Ma'am," or "Officer." Remain calm and quiet while the officer is reviewing your documents. If the officer writes you a ticket, accept it quietly and never complain. Listen to any instruction on paying the fine or contesting the ticket, and immediately leave.
If you are pulled over in a car, the first thing you should to do is turn your car off, turn the dome light on (if it's nighttime), roll down the window, and keep your hands on the steering wheel. Don't immediately reach into your glove compartment for your license and registration. Officers want to be able to see your hands for their own safety. Wait until the officer asks to see your paperwork before retrieving your documents.

3) Say No to Search Requests
If a police officer asks your permission to search, the answer is always no. You should refuse to consent by saying, "Officer, I do not consent to any searches of my private property."
You are under no obligation to consent. The only reason an officer asks your permission is because he doesn't have enough evidence to search without your consent. If you consent to a search request you give up one of the most important constitutional rights you have-your Fourth Amendment protection against unreasonable searches and seizures.
Police officers are not required to inform you of your rights before asking you to consent to a search. If the officer searches you in spite of your objection, your attorney can argue that any evidence found during the search was discovered through an illegal search and should be thrown out of court.


4) Determine if You Can Leave
You have the right to terminate an encounter with a police officer unless you are being detained under police custody or have been arrested. The general rule is that you don't have to answer any questions that the police ask you. This rule comes from the Fifth Amendment of the U.S. Constitution, which protects you against self-incrimination. If you cannot tell if you are allowed to leave, say to the officer, "I have to be on my way. Am I free to go?"
If the officer says "Yes," tell him to have a nice day, and leave immediately. If the officer's answer is ambiguous, or if he asks you another unrelated question, persist by asking "Am I being detained, or can I go now?"
If the officer says "No," you are being detained, and you may be placed under arrest. If this is the case, reassert your rights as outlined above, and follow Rules #5 and #6.

5) Remain Silent and Ask for an Attorney
Do not answer questions without a lawyer representing you present. Even seemingly casual small talk can come back to haunt you. Anything you say can, and probably will, be used against you.
In just about any case imaginable, a person is best off not answering any questions about his involvement in anything illegal. Assert your Fifth and Sixth Amendment rights by saying these exact words: "Officer, I'd like to remain silent and I'd like to speak with a lawyer."
Keep in mind the credo: If no one talks, everyone walks. Regardless of what you are told by an investigating officer, you have nothing to gain by talking to the police ... and everything to lose.

6) Do Not Try to Bargain
Police officers will often tell you that your cooperation will make things easier for you, and many people hope to be let off easy if they are honest and direct with the police. The only thing it makes easier is the officer's job. Do not let the threat of arrest scare you into admitting guilt. Ask to speak with a lawyer, and remain silent.

7) Do Not Physically Resist
If the police proceed to detain, search, or arrest you despite your wishes-do not physically resist. You may state clearly but non-confrontationally: "Officer, I am not resisting arrest and I do not consent to any searches." Or you may assert your rights by simply saying nothing until you can speak with an attorney.

8) Where to Go For More Help
If you feel your rights are being violated, try to wait until you can talk to a lawyer. If you don't have your own lawyer you can fill out an application for a public defender to defend you. This application is available at the Clerk’s office and does require a $50.00 application fee. If you are determined to be indigent by the clerk, our office will be appointed to handle your case.



Corrupt cops notwithstanding, the above is advice most likely to get the case dismissed.
Hope it helps.
I've never been searched or asked if I or my property/car could be searched, but this is what I understand to do.

Be careful out there, folks. Don't speed, or even do 'soft stops' or 'rolling stops' at STOP signs.


ETA SOURCE: Know Your Rights
edit on 5/2/2014 by BuzzyWigs because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 05:39 AM
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The only "rights" we have anymore when in cars is to turn the steering wheel clockwise.
Add in the Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision that police no longer even need a warrant to search your car and were completely at their mercy, which sadly few seem to have anymore.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 09:12 AM
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Hell forget about the casino's, If you ever want to double your money there's this crooked cop I know out in Nevada....



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 10:03 AM
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originally posted by: liejunkie01



To get his money back, Nguyen had to sue Humboldt County, Dove and Sheriff Ed Kilgore, and the county eventually settled with Nguyen for $50,000 and $10,000 in attorney’s fees. In the suit, Ohlson contended that Dove had violated Nguyen’s Fourth Amendment rights. The Fourth Amendment bans unreasonable search and seizure




www.offthegridnews.com...



It looks like he got his money back and it cost the county $10,000 for his legal fees.



The cop shuld be fired.

It's OK, the video posted and consequent public opinion has already occurred.
Much better than being fired-- he has been identified. Glad I'm not him....
if it was in my state, and the LEO is supposed to be held to a higher standard:
he had a sidearm when the loot was taken. Whether the weapon was presented
or not is irrelevant, it was visible. I'd have pressed for Armed Robbery too.
edit on 2-5-2014 by derfreebie because: If you can't take the heat don't be it.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 12:17 PM
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originally posted by: Daedalus

any officer who is ignorant of the law, has no place being in a position to enforce it.



That would be the majority then.

They arent the sharpest tools in the box. All the steroids have turned their brains to gravy.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 12:19 PM
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originally posted by: derfreebie
the LEO is supposed to be held to a higher standard:
he had a sidearm when the loot was taken. Whether the weapon was presented
or not is irrelevant, it was visible. I'd have pressed for Armed Robbery too.


I like the cut of your jib.
It would be karmic retribution.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 12:21 PM
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originally posted by: Asktheanimals
The only "rights" we have anymore when in cars is to turn the steering wheel clockwise.
Add in the Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision that police no longer even need a warrant to search your car and were completely at their mercy, which sadly few seem to have anymore.


I dont think that that is technically true. The truth is that they do need a warrant, and probable cause, but the majority of the population is so ignorant of their own rights that these abuses of power happen far too often, and seem "normal" and "legal" even though they are not.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 01:45 PM
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a reply to: Wrabbit2000


This officer has just set himself up for getting sued civilly, a landmark case, and has made Mr.Nguyen a future multi-millionaire.

He did not give consent.

And I know plenty of people that carry money around like that to buy cars, boats, etc in different states. Dealer doesn't have to mean drugs.

Keep your eye on this one folks cause it will set new legal case history very shortly.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 01:49 PM
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originally posted by: Asktheanimals
The only "rights" we have anymore when in cars is to turn the steering wheel clockwise.
Add in the Pennsylvania Supreme Court decision that police no longer even need a warrant to search your car and were completely at their mercy, which sadly few seem to have anymore.


Pennsylvania supreme court decision will get overturned eventually.

Even though the checks and balance system is a bit flawed, it still works given enough time.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 02:03 PM
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originally posted by: BuzzyWigs

Be careful out there, folks. Don't speed, or even do 'soft stops' or 'rolling stops' at STOP signs.


ETA SOURCE: Know Your Rights


Don't speed? Are you kidding me?

Check your states laws please. I know in NC the police have the right to stop you:
1. For going too fast
2. Going too slow
3. Going the speed limit

Yes, that's right. On the law books in NC police have the right to stop you for GOING THE SPEED LIMIT.

So, just like "I smelled something" they can just "decide" to stop you.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 03:15 PM
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originally posted by: BuzzyWigs
I've never been searched or asked if I or my property/car could be searched, but this is what I understand to do.


You should try being a part white guy giving a black guy a ride in a white neighborhood..

Story time WEE!!

Once apon a time I lived in a ghetto.. I used to drive people to work at this mall that went through a really white(racist) area (Yes racist area.. The chief was caught and printed in the local paper here that he stated: "I am sick of you n*****s coming into my town and F'ing things up")and taking them to work..

One day I had some black dude in my car i was taking him to work and I was turning onto a road and saw a cop there.. He followed us for 1.8 miles up to the mall.. flashed his lights for us to pull over(See I knew these cops were douches) so I pulled ver near a sears where I knew there were security cameras in case things went bad...

Cop gets out of the car cops to the driver side and says "Are there drugs in the car?" I stated no.. He repeated this like 5 or 6 times till he went over to the black guy.. same gig... But after the 5th time he told the guy to get out of the car to be searched... He got done being searched and he let the black guy back in the car.. He came over to my side and asked again drugs.. I said no.. He got all pissy and left.. Didn't even say sorry bla bla typical nice crap your supposed to say..

From here I I force learned the bill of rights.. Specifically 1 2 4 5 6 9..

I will tell you what.. Cops are douchebags and they have no problem showing it.. Even when you have a camera on them... I am surprised they didn't do more..
edit on 5/2/2014 by ThichHeaded because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 03:23 PM
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a reply to: ThichHeaded


You should try being a part white guy giving a black guy a ride in a white neiborhood..

Well,
Maybe I 'should', but since I'm not a part-white guy, I can't really respond to this suggestion.

I do, however, hear several sirens right outside my house, so...
forgive me but I have to see what's going on.



posted on May, 2 2014 @ 03:25 PM
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a reply to: BuzzyWigs

whoosh....


originally posted by: BuzzyWigs

Be careful out there, folks. Don't speed, or even do 'soft stops' or 'rolling stops' at STOP signs.


ETA SOURCE: Know Your Rights




Going speed limit or to slow in designated speed limit.. Crime acting suspicious..
You can be pulled over if you are doing the speed limit or lower than the speed limit in some areas because they think you are up to no good.
edit on 5/2/2014 by ThichHeaded because: (no reason given)




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