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Graphene coming to your devices, courtesy of Samsung

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posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 04:01 AM
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Wafer-Scale Growth of Single-Crystal Monolayer Graphene on Reusable Hydrogen-Terminated Germanium


The uniform growth of single-crystal graphene over wafer-scale areas remains a challenge in the commercial-level manufacturability of various electronic, photonic, mechanical, and other devices based on graphene. Here, we describe wafer-scale growth of wrinkle-free single-crystal monolayer graphene on silicon wafer using a hydrogen-terminated germanium buffer layer. The anisotropic twofold symmetry of the germanium (110) surface allowed unidirectional alignment of multiple seeds, which were merged to uniform single-crystal graphene with predefined orientation. Furthermore, the weak interaction between graphene and underlying hydrogen-terminated germanium surface enabled the facile etch-free dry transfer of graphene and the recycling of the germanium substrate for continual graphene growth.


This is huge, graphene is a one atom tick material that have some of the best properties known to us regarding electrical conductivity and toughness among other things, if we are able to use it in electronics it will produce super miniaturized with hundreds of times better performance and possibly allow flexible devices.

Although all of this is true, there is a huge problem with graphene (there are many but this is the most important currently) it cannot be produced at industrial scales. graphene is a crystalline structure that can range from a few hundred nanometers to micrometers, the current best methods to produced in large scales consist on its growth on top of a substrate, in theory you can cover an infinite surface of the substrate in a single layer of graphene, but in reality although you can cover the substrate with mostly a single layer of graphene this is not a single structure, as nucleation starts at multiple points of the substrate and several crystals grows until the crystallization fronts come into contact to each other generating defects in the structure.



This decreases the properties drastically of graphene to the point that it possess worse properties than the materials its suppose to replace, but here comes Samsung with the claim that they have solved this problem creating a substrate that allows easy removal of the graphene after synthesis (best current substrate is copper that have to be destroyed to recover the graphene) and more importantly allows to orientate all the growth of the different crystals in one direction resulting in a seeming uniform structure that can be growth to the size of the wafers used to produce electronics (30-45cm).

If this is true graphene is coming our way sooner than expected, but there is another huge catch to graphene that no one have solve yet, its a zero band gap material, meaning it always conduct electricity which translate into you cannot turn it on/off so you cannot implement it as the current transistor systems.




posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 06:30 AM
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Samsung is coming along in leaps and bounds on many fronts but I don't see the american connection !

You see I own a Samsung smart TV and apart from using techniques to upload data scanned for all over my home network back to Korea that are so sophisticated that even SSL man in the middle cannot hack these TV's they also connect to all the big internet names the second that the TV is turned on even with no applications being open.

Now when I hear about progress from this Company I even start to look at the little on/off button at the bottom of the screen and wonder if it has a nano sized camera in it because the TV knows if someone is in the room because it goes to sleep mode when no one is watching but i am not sure if it's done by sound or what.

Far too much technology today is being used to imprison us and we need to slow it down until we have laws that work to protect us from it's use.

Them Google Glasses are going to change the world in ways that would make a horror story as they are introduced to the work place and you are free to resist if you don't mind being out of a job and the seeds have already been sown for this in the form of heath & safety to offer up an excuse as to why we must all wear them.



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 06:41 AM
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reply to post by VirusGuard
 


With this kind of thinking we would just be Amish trapped in the 19th century, in the 60s computers that does what a tablet does today filled entire buildings, graphene will allow a jump in technology like this.

Fear only hinder progress, would you like to live all your life afraid?
edit on 7-4-2014 by Indigent because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 06:44 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 06:55 AM
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edit on 4/7/2014 by Deaf Alien because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 06:55 AM
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reply to post by Indigent
 

No my friend it's not fear it's being educated to see where this will lead.

As i said we need laws to protect us from the use and not allow ourselves to be washed along by the banks and corporations that build these new devices.

Technology today brings us the light bulb that does not burn as long as they did back in the 1920's so I am sorry if I don't share the same blind faith as you do towards these advancements and this comes to you from someone that has a good understanding of physics, science and computers so the argument about running around riding a house holds no water.

edit on 7-4-2014 by VirusGuard because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 07:01 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 07:03 AM
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reply to post by VirusGuard
 


Ok lets derail the thread to see your point.

We need laws instead of freedom to protect us from law enforcements that will violate their own laws to spy on us to ensure our freedom.

I can see the total relation of a law to the advancement of the human race


Ban the evil carbon allotrope!!! limit our freedoms with more laws!!!



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 07:17 AM
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reply to post by Indigent
 


I was listening to an interview on Radio 4 last week with graphene's co-identifier, Andre Geim last week. It reminded me of your previous thread on this general topic. He seems to believe that commercial application of the material are some way off but that hundreds of ideas are floating round. Synthesis would get over the cost issue and make commerical uses more realisable, I suppose.



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 07:26 AM
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reply to post by KilgoreTrout
 


Yes the measured properties of graphene yield some of the highest values ever measured in any material, this created some hype that is not meet with the real properties of average graphene as it can be obtained by several ways that gives mixed results in quality.



It is expected his hype reach a maximum in the near future and them crash, after this some real applications will be observed for graphene.



To be honest i work with graphene and i'm not too optimistic about it, but when big companies invest fortunes to develop graphene technology there must be something behind it



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 07:29 AM
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Indigent
reply to post by VirusGuard
 

Ok lets derail the thread to see your point.


Well that's not what I am trying to do and the thread was void of any reply until I posted so I cannot subscribe to that theory.

My comments were just a footnote to remind people that a lot new technology is being used against us and that Samsung should not be trusted and I am sorry if that became the topic of discussion so I will clear off and let the discussion move towards nano-tubes

Wait a second

Scotch - tape ?

That's how it got invented in the first place after a student penciled a square on a bit of paper and pulled a thin layer off using sticky tape.
edit on 7-4-2014 by VirusGuard because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 07:37 AM
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reply to post by VirusGuard
 




the thread was void of any reply until I posted so I cannot subscribe to that theory.


Thank you good sir, i owe you lots for this...

I got like 100 more topics with few to non comments if you want to spam more... (please do not resurrect them I'm not being honest)



Nah joking I don't care about that things, I simply just don't share your point of view as I made it clear in my first reply, but them you basically called mindless drones to us the ones that don't share your POV and I lost complete interest in all you have to say here



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 07:40 AM
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I wonder if graphene may become the next asbestos (the wonder material of the 1950s and 1960s). Similarly to asbestos, tiny microscopic pieces of airborne graphene can lodge in the lung, causing major health risks.

Asbestos was considered a wonder material because when mixed in as part of a substrate, it made that substrate fireproof -- which was great for the building industry. So asbestos was added to lots of things -- insulation, ceiling tile material, floor tiles, wall materials, construction adhesives, etc. The problem was that as these materials broke down with age, tiny pieces of asbestos would become airborne, and would lodge in the lungs of people.

Now comes graphene, which carries similar health concerns:

Graphene stymies body's efforts to expel it

Is Graphehe Safe?

Graphene 'could pose health risk' to workers


I'm all for using applying graphene to help us all take technological leaps, but the safety of the product needs to be considered, not just its ability to advance technology -- especially if it becomes so ubiquitous as asbestos once was.


edit on 4/7/2014 by Soylent Green Is People because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 07:41 AM
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Wait a second

Scotch - tape ?

That's how it got invented in the first place after a student penciled a square on a bit of paper and pulled a thin layer off using sticky tape.
reply to post by VirusGuard
 


Oh yes that is exactly how it was isolated the first time and they got a Nobel price for it. sadly most people at the beginning use that method to characterize it and graphene obtained by other methods does not live to the expectations they created



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 07:45 AM
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reply to post by Soylent Green Is People
 


This is one of the reasons to why carbon nanotubes were so popular mid 90s early 2000s and now not, they have very bad health issues if inhale, its a problem of anything that is in the order of a few hundred nanometers like nano clays and so on. carbon nanotubes just had worse publicity.



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 07:50 AM
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reply to post by Indigent
 


Sir Andre, in the radio programme, stated that there were numerous possibilities for it's application, from being a replacement to silicon in computers, to foldable screens or as a speedy means of analysising DNA material. One thing that he did mention though that I found very interesting, was that it was currently being developed for use with the Fukushima contamination in the form of barrier films. It seems to have a great deal of promise in that area, amongst others.


The discovery, Tour said, could be a boon in the cleanup of contaminated sites like the Fukushima nuclear plants damaged by the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. It could also cut the cost of hydraulic fracturing (“fracking”) for oil and gas recovery and help reboot American mining of rare earth metals, he said.

Graphene oxide’s large surface area defines its capacity to adsorb toxins, Kalmykov said. “So the high retention properties are not surprising to us,” he said. “What is astonishing is the very fast kinetics of sorption, which is key.”

“In the probabilistic world of chemical reactions where scarce stuff (low concentrations) infrequently bumps into something with which it can react, there is a greater likelihood that the ‘magic’ will happen with graphene oxide than with a big old hunk of bentonite,” said Steven Winston, a former vice president of Lockheed Martin and Parsons Engineering and an expert in nuclear power and remediation who is working with the researchers. “In short, fast is good.”


- See more at: news.rice.edu...



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 07:58 AM
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VirusGuard
reply to post by Indigent
 

No my friend it's not fear it's being educated to see where this will lead.

As i said we need laws to protect us from the use and not allow ourselves to be washed along by the banks and corporations that build these new devices.

Technology today brings us the light bulb that does not burn as long as they did back in the 1920's so I am sorry if I don't share the same blind faith as you do towards these advancements and this comes to you from someone that has a good understanding of physics, science and computers so the argument about running around riding a house holds no water.

edit on 7-4-2014 by VirusGuard because: (no reason given)


I had to quote your message to give this reply a decent foundation. A look back in computer technology tells us where we've been and what put us in a legitimate defensive position today. Reflect back to when some of us complained a couple of decades ago about the new tactic of businesses putting "cookies" into our personal computers which garnered no direct responses from government to stop the practice.

With the revelations about the NSA collecting all of our data ( not to mention private businesses), we now know why government failed to step in to eliminate the practice. The bottom line is that there is no protection and never will be again of our personal privacy. Excusing the loss of privacy as inevitable due to the advent of technology is a ludicrous answer. The bottom line is it has been allowed and sought after because it is the long-termed goal of business and government and we consumers must submit. The day is fast coming when if you want to safeguard your privacy in any form you will be considered suspect. Because the question you will be asked by others that have submitted to the wiles of technology will be, "So, what do you have to hide?"



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 08:07 AM
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reply to post by Aliensun
 




The day is fast coming when if you want to safeguard your privacy in any form you will be considered suspect. Because the question you will be asked by others that have submitted to the wiles of technology will be, "So, what do you have to hide?"


There are many reasons to want to keep information private, for example Samsung for sure would like to avoid to lose their edge due to industrial espionage, there is no doubt about there is a problem in this, but to assume progress is wrong or is pushed to spy on us its just crazy.

In the end its a compromise of the advantages and disadvantages that things brings and the pros of the developing technologies outperform the cons. also it seems we got an obsession with being observer, before it was god/angels/santa seeing everything we do, now is the evil technology



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 10:07 AM
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reply to post by crazyewok
 


Not that I need to speak for anyone else and certainly virusguard doesn't need me to protect , but technology has gotten us into trouble as well. I am sure the world could live without the technology of hydrogen bombs, viruses, nerve gas, spy satellites, mind altering drugs, etc. It isn't all fun and roses when it comes to technology. Hows the air you breath, the water you drink, both polluted because of industrial manufacturing brought to you by technology. We now try to manipulate the weather through HAARP & Chemtrail Technology hows that working for you? There are thousands of examples, technology also does incredibly great things, for me an MRI would be a great example. As usual it's man that creates the problem and misuses the technological tool. I think everyone would agree there are a few we could live without, specially the ones the NSA find so useful to use against it's citizens.



posted on Apr, 7 2014 @ 10:14 AM
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VirusGuard
...Technology today brings us the light bulb that does not burn as long as they did back in the 1920's so I am sorry if I don't share the same blind faith as you do towards these advancements


It isn't technology that makes regular filament light bulbs not as long-lasting as they were in the 1920s. That's the free market, and the balance between that free market providing a "good enough" product for consumers at a "cheap enough" production cost for the manufacturer.

Technology has nothing to do with it. In fact, technology has created better light bulbs than the light bulbs from the 1920s, although at a higher cost.



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