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Is Prison Better Then Poverty?

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posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 05:42 PM
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reply to post by IronVelvet
 


Sure, but ive been locked up and believe it or not many chose it as a way of life rather then facing responsibility when they get out and working for a better life.

Its a very sick cycle and a lot of people are chosing prison over poverty.




posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 05:51 PM
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Those individuals you speak of have mental problems a high majority if not 100% of the time. There is no place for them to go. Our mental health facilities in the U.S. Have become non existent due to Reagan. These people would gladly go somewhere else. They have nothing. Often no families, or families that don't speak to them. They are left without a choice to find something better. Most are unable to hold jobs. Almost all are homeless. You combine all those factors and you get the end result of it appearing to you that they want to get back in there. For many it is a warm bed and a hot meal, no matter how terrible it might be for you. They are left without a choice. Without medication or the ability to pay for it. They are caught in one of the worst catch 22s ever devised. These people should be rehabilitated, have provided housing, counseling and moderation and overall free medication so that they can be useful to society instead of a drain on it. It's nonsense. It's pointless and all those that say this is the way things are, are simply too much of a coward to do anything about it. Small minded men destroy civilizations, they don't build them.
edit on 8-2-2014 by IronVelvet because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-2-2014 by IronVelvet because: (no reason given)

edit on 8-2-2014 by IronVelvet because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 05:58 PM
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reply to post by IronVelvet
 


So its better to have a discussion about the points that you present rather then be dismissive.

Your last post is the only one i agree with. What you said are issues that should be brought into the mainstream political conversation rather then thrown into the, out of sight out of mind pile like everything else.



posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 06:55 PM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


You didn't present the question clearly enough. A better question would have been. Is the current prison systems complex supporting the growing wealth inequality not just in the U .S. but around the world, and could it actually be detrimental to the overall growth, progression and evolution of society?



posted on Feb, 8 2014 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by IronVelvet
 


You didnt ask for clarification.

Obviously i don't personally think its better as a personal choice for myself.



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 01:54 AM
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QuantumKat
reply to post by projectbane
 


I would bet you I have more highly educated but I'm a convicted criminal.


Hmmmmm.....really?

Shot yourself in the foot there!



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 02:02 AM
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LOSTinAMERICA
reply to post by projectbane
 


I hope someone has zero tolerance for you. I want you to see you're not special. Try living a mile in their shoes. Here's an example: Say a guy has a family and lost his job. He worked there for 10 years and doesn't know anything except that job. He can reinvent himself but lacks the funds to do so. He can go into debt taking out student loans but that doesn't lock a job in today's market. He may even be a little slow but still wants his children fed. He resorts to stealing some food for his family because he was denied any assistance. He knows that his family will be able to get on assistance if he goes to jail, so he does the deed. Zero tolerance lol. It won't be soon before something you do now is considered illegal and maybe you'll get to walk down that isle and wonder why no one has sympathy for you. Not everyone is built for the service economy and as more of our jobs take a plunge, you can bet your bottom dollar that more people will resort to a life of crime and they won't be as nice as my example. Maybe you should have given them a god damned chance when you had the opportunity.



No, I shouldn't of given them a chance. And the example you gave is maybe the exception to the rule. For society to continue to flourish people whether they like it or not must abide the laws of the land.


If everybody uses their "judgment" to say what laws they will and will not follow will inevitably turn chaotic.

I am not a rich man, I do not break the laws that have been put in place. do I agree with all the laws? NO WAY!! But a line must be drawn for the good of society.

I love my job but it will never make me rich. Does that give me the right to do as I please? It does not.

Your argument is null and void.



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 04:51 AM
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projectbane
If everybody uses their "judgment" to say what laws they will and will not follow will inevitably turn chaotic.

I am not a rich man, I do not break the laws that have been put in place. do I agree with all the laws? NO WAY!! But a line must be drawn for the good of society.

I love my job but it will never make me rich. Does that give me the right to do as I please? It does not.

Your argument is null and void.



It's your duty as a citizen to break unjust laws. Disagreement with a law doesn't make it unjust, but certain laws harm society rather than help it, and are created by faulty reasoning. For example, the law that you can't feed a homeless person.

Strict adherence to the law, because it's the law is one of the worst things an individual can do.



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 06:09 AM
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reply to post by onequestion
 


Simple answer is yes, 3 meals a day, heat, shelter and on the spot medical treatment is more than we offer our unemployed never mind the poor homeless!

Here in the U.K we treat our prisoners better than the elderly, especially so if they are a sex offender considering the chances are they will be given their own cell with Playstation, 27inch TV and on suite bathroom!


Don't know about the U.S through, chances are unless you are a big dude, at some point, you are going to be getting bummed!

edit on 9-2-2014 by andy06shake because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 06:45 AM
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The people at the top in this country don't give a F- about anyone. It's all about money and if there's no money in it for them then they don't care. With capitalism it's a cutthroat society based on personal gain at all cost. Then when someone shoots up a school or does something stupid to make the news people say "oh the humanity" and wonder why such things happen. The problem isn't guns movies or video games it's they way our society works. As a whole America is a self centered greedy selfish society. It's all about nurmero uno and screw everyone else. Then people use their self richeous attitude and say I made it so can you as if we all walk the same path in life.

They tell us we're free in this country but they brainwash us from the day we're born. We're told what to think and believe in the media and in the schools. We're told that if we work hard anyone can succeed in America. In truth we're nothing but a bunch of slaves and the only people making the real money are at the top. They can buy anything they want including the government. They own this place and everything in it including us.



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 07:54 AM
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I have worked in a prison for most of my adult life, in many different positions.

I have seen people purposefully commit serious rules violations, especially when it is winter, in order to be held over past their release date, in order to avoid release.

About 35 percent of the prisoners are doing life on the installment plan and do not want to change or are incapable of change.

Our prisons became the de facto mental health institutions when NIMH was defunded.

Most of the prisons are now holding people who have committed drug offenses. One of the primary reasons for drug use is people are self-medicating for issues relating to physical pain or mental pain.



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 08:06 AM
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Aazadan

projectbane
If everybody uses their "judgment" to say what laws they will and will not follow will inevitably turn chaotic.

I am not a rich man, I do not break the laws that have been put in place. do I agree with all the laws? NO WAY!! But a line must be drawn for the good of society.

I love my job but it will never make me rich. Does that give me the right to do as I please? It does not.

Your argument is null and void.



It's your duty as a citizen to break unjust laws. Disagreement with a law doesn't make it unjust, but certain laws harm society rather than help it, and are created by faulty reasoning. For example, the law that you can't feed a homeless person.

Strict adherence to the law, because it's the law is one of the worst things an individual can do.


When it comes to the issue of actually helping people break the cycle of prison in their lives, this concept is specifically avoided. A simple assessment of the situation dictates a person in prison does not have the acumen necessary to make this type of judgment call.
edit on 9-2-2014 by totallackey because: clarity



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 05:59 PM
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reply to post by totallackey
 


And being locked up in close quarters with bunch of lunatics is likely to make you one, if you are not off the deep end already. Same goes for living in the ghetto areas really, only difference is the bars keeping you there are different kinds. Cages everywhere you look.



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 06:20 PM
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totallackey
When it comes to the issue of actually helping people break the cycle of prison in their lives, this concept is specifically avoided. A simple assessment of the situation dictates a person in prison does not have the acumen necessary to make this type of judgment call.
edit on 9-2-2014 by totallackey because: clarity


It doesn't apply in all cases, I would agree that habitual offenders probably lack the ability to determine what is and isn't an unjust law, but as far as the outside world is concerned what is the difference between a convicted felon who was dealing drugs because they disagree with them being illegal and a convicted felon who would habitually hack into wifi because they disagreed with the NSA/ISP monitoring their activity? I would argue the later was breaking an unjust law but these types of things are subjective. Many people agree with the laws against feeding the homeless, that's why they were passed. Recognizing the difference between the popular and right opinions in a democracy are important, that's what distinguishes it from mob rule, but doing what's right is sometimes illegal.



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 11:00 PM
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reply to post by projectbane
 


You can drink the kool-aid all you want. You might not have anything to give but some of us do. I would help anyone who was really trying to do the right thing. You can be miserable and hoard your gains but don't look down on someone when you need help and they snub their nose at you. Human compassion needs to make a strong comeback in my opinion. I would not turn someone away because of a criminal past. They served their time and need someone to help them get back on the right track. By not helping them you just perpetuate the problem.

Give them a fish and they will eat for a day, but give them the means to fish and they eat for a lifetime. Don't be bitter because you are poor, I have lived in the streets before and in Detroit I might add. I lived on both coasts also. I thank anyone who helped me out along the way and spread the love by helping others now. There is no moot point only compassion. Try it because the feeling you get is so much better than hate or fear.



posted on Feb, 9 2014 @ 11:12 PM
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I personally would die before committing a crime just to be able to escape the suffering on the outside, I would die with more self respect and dignity than I would have if I had done some crime to get in prison to alleviate the harshness of life in the world. (I'm not meaning to condemn anyone who has done crimes however..)

I would still try to stay alive, but would not commit any crime for the hope of gaining from it to get dry, and fed, and under a roof.. Prison isn't worth that for anyone in my opinion. But I do understand the motive for people who are willing to do that. I have gone hungry for a week one time and started to become unconcerned about everything and I was really getting hungry.. , but curiously never wanted to steal or commit a crime, and never did.. The less sinning a person fills his/her mind with, the easier it is to stop doing them... And if one believes in karma, the payoff for virtue is sometimes rewarded 100 fold..That is a better risk than prison gives.
edit on 9-2-2014 by alienreality because: (no reason given)

edit on 9-2-2014 by alienreality because: (no reason given)



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