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"It Just Keeps Running and Running"

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posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 09:41 AM
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It sounds like Engel's expertise is in chemistry. I seem to recall seeing that chemists have a better understanding of electricity than physicists do.




posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 11:32 AM
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daskakik
He was also said to be a very good watchmaker.
Zenith meets Breguet: the Chronometers of Thomas Engel


Your link didn't work for me so I googled the phrase myself and this is the same Thomas Engel and he is referred to as a professor: "Zenith meets Breguet: the Chronometers of Thomas Engel"



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 11:43 AM
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Mary Rose
"Zenith meets Breguet: the Chronometers of Thomas Engel"


Apparently Engel has written a book:


Engel also wrote a book on the life and work of Breguet: A.L. Breguet, Watchmaker to Kings, subtitled Thoughts on Time (Lucerne, 1994) – illustrated below, including a photo of Engel’s own spectacular No. 17, c. 1981, with tourbillon and tact complications. He is an honorary member of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers (the London watch and clockmakers’ guild established in 1631, and the world’s oldest surviving horological institution). His watches are remarkably elegant pieces with their Breguet DNA, but with souped-up versions of Zenith’s finest chronometer movement, probably more accurate than anything the Master produced.



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 12:12 PM
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Mary Rose
Apparently Engel has written a book . . .


He apparently also has written an autobiography:


Engel taught himself watchmaking, taking a special interest in the techniques used to produce fine rose-engine cut dials in the style of Breguet. With his inherent mechanical aptitude he became a good dial and casemaker, but employed formally trained craftsman to make unique movements for the watches that bore his name on the dial.

mb.nawcc.org...



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 12:28 PM
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This kind of thing is great.

I hope people never stop trying to break the laws of physics, even if they fail.
We have only begun to understand and deal with these forces.

In spending billions of dollars looking for, and supposedly finding the Higgs boson,
I hope, these expensive endeavors will eventually enable the manipulation mass and inertia.

All types of wonders will then be possible, from over unity, "magneto mechanical" devices,
to super luminal travel.



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 01:58 PM
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Mary Rose
. . . the German newspaper Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung . . . "It just keeps running and running" by Lukas Weber . . .


If there is a bilingual German-English speaking member reading this who could get in touch with technology editor (I assume) from the newspaper, Lukas Weber, that would be great. I would like Lukas Weber to tell us what the topic of lectures has been that Thomas Engel has given at universities all over the world. Anything to do with "the enormous energy which is inherent in quanta" or a "quantum deviation apparatus"?



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 03:31 PM
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reply to post by Mary Rose
 

I don't think he gave university lectures. If he did it was probably about plastics.



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 04:00 PM
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reply to post by daskakik
 


Why would you say he didn't give university lectures and then say maybe he did about plastics?

What's your point?



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 06:01 PM
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rom12345
In spending billions of dollars looking for, and supposedly finding the Higgs boson,
I hope, these expensive endeavors will eventually enable the manipulation mass and inertia.


Ill correct that and say "this cheap endeavour"



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 06:20 PM
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Nothing in existence, so far, can beat the radioisotope thermoelectric generator or RTG for short. The two Voyager space craft use RTGs for power and each Voyager's ouput at launch was about 470 watts. Since the Voyager launches, the RTG outputs have dropped to 315 watts. Not bad for over three decades.

RTGs run on plutonium 238, which is very toxic for the environment so RTGs will never make it to the consumer. Consumer carelessness and disposal of great quantities of radioactive waste make RTGs impractical for commercial or consumer use.

The system postulated by the OP can not work because after a load is applied, friction and/or heat will cause its failure.
edit on 2-2-2014 by eManym because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 06:26 PM
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Mary Rose
Why would you say he didn't give university lectures and then say maybe he did about plastics?

What's your point?
daskakik could have a point. All the lectures I had in graduate school were given by PhD professors on staff. On occasion, they would invite guest speakers who often were not PhDs to talk to us about certain topics they had knowledge in. I always thought of these as "talks" and not "lectures" like the professors gave, though I suppose someone with a different semantic view could claim otherwise, which is how I interpret what daskakik said. If the man knows something about plastics which apparently he does, he could be invited to talk about that as a "guest speaker" even if he's not really a professor giving a lecture.



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 06:44 PM
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eManym
The system postulated by the OP can not work because after a load is applied, friction and/or heat will cause its failure.


The article specifically pointed out the lack of heat being generated, and the forum post I read specifically talked about the apparent lack of friction in this device.



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 06:46 PM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 


The point is this guy is obviously talented.

The fact that he is self-educated tells me he has a thing or two to instruct universities about.
edit on 02/02/14 by Mary Rose because: Typo



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 07:46 PM
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Mary Rose
reply to post by daskakik
 


Why would you say he didn't give university lectures and then say maybe he did about plastics?

What's your point?

My point is that he doesn't seem to be much involved in academics and if he was ever invited as a speaker it would have probably been to talk about the field that he worked in.



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 09:27 PM
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reply to post by daskakik
 


Yes, and that is the point of this thread.

He is an accomplished inventor. His knowledge of chemistry includes an understanding of electrical charge and his clock making demonstrates mechanical ability. Maybe his unique experience has resulted in a new innovation.



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 10:13 PM
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Mary Rose
The point is this guy is obviously talented.

The fact that he is self-educated tells me he has a thing or two to instruct universities about.
I wouldn't suggest otherwise, to either of those.

I also think the people who built this are talented, in that they can make engineering plans and fabricate something to match those plans:

www.pureenergyblog.com...

That doesn't mean it will work. Their talents have limits.



posted on Feb, 2 2014 @ 10:24 PM
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reply to post by Mary Rose
 

I'm not passing judgment. I am just saying that there doesn't seem to be any information about him being linked to any university and the only thing that comes up in regard to anything quantum seems to be his description of the motor.



posted on Feb, 3 2014 @ 03:31 AM
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reply to post by daskakik
 

It is not claimed he was a professor. The reference to professor in regard to him being a clock maker must have been an honorary title.

We don't know what the topic of his talks has been. Even if it has been about plastics it could still give us insights on the sub-atomic realm.

It may be valid criticism of the reporting that an instrument was not used to measure the output on the device, but I think that if Engel did receive the Diesel Medal for innovation and if he is an honorary member of the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers that it may be that he has a real innovation.



posted on Feb, 3 2014 @ 07:06 AM
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reply to post by Arbitrageur
 





That doesn't mean it will work. Their talents have limits.


Stupid laws of physics,
Always limiting crackpots.



posted on Feb, 3 2014 @ 07:32 AM
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reply to post by butcherguy
 


That word "crackpot" serves no useful purpose in the world of cutting edge science and technology in my opinion.

Ridicule is a fallacy of reason that is used by vested interests so they can continue to be vested interests. That, and sometimes brutal suppression.




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