BREAKING: California officially NULLIFIES NDAA Indefinite Detention (Gov. signed into law)

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posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 02:50 PM
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Here is a video of the California Assemblyman (Republican) who has managed to get overwhelming Democrat support (which is very very very rare here in California) for his NDAA nullification bill aka "The Liberty Preservation Act". None of us in California would've ever thought that NDAA nullification would ever be signed into law in a state like California but it just goes to show with the right cause and a strong enough case, you can get the support of even the most corrupt politicians in either party.


FYI: Tim Donnelly, the author of "The Liberty Preservation Act" is also running for governor of California as we speak.


Visit this link to learn more about the Tenth Amendment and also see a map of which states are nullifying the NDAA:
tracking.tenthamendmentcenter.com...


benswann.com...


Assembly Bill (AB) 351 was signed into law by Governor Jerry Brown yesterday. California is the third state to have passed legislation, which nullifies the unpopular federal provision.

The bill specifically states:
It is the policy of this state to refuse to provide material support for or to participate in any way with the implementation within this state of any federal law that purports to authorize indefinite detention of a person within California. (emphasis added)

This meaning the legislation takes aim at not only the NDAA provision, but any federal law, which seeks to disregard one’s constitutional rights.

Democrats and republicans worked together to sponsor and pass the legislation. The bill was introduced by ultra-conservative Tim Donnelly, and managed by San Francisco liberal-democrat Mark Leno.

Tenth Amendment Center’s national communications director Mike Mike Maharrey tells us-
“Lawmakers from both sides of the aisle came together and passed legislation to protect against federal kidnapping,” adding that, “by saying, ‘No!’ to indefinite detention and refusing any state cooperation, the California legislature and Gov. Brown just ensured it will be very hard to whisk somebody away in the dead of night and hold them without due process.”
edit on 2-10-2013 by eLPresidente because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 03:01 PM
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reply to post by eLPresidente
 

Way to go! California?!

Great news all around and, yes, astonishing to get Democratic support. All good signs for the future of America.




posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 03:07 PM
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greencmp
reply to post by eLPresidente
 

Way to go! California?!

Great news all around and, yes, astonishing to get Democratic support. All good signs for the future of America.



astonishing?...as a California left-of-center resident, I think this is great, as most liberals do. I'll type this in simple words....99% of liberals believe in the constitution too, regardless of what the talking heads of the right tell you.



posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 03:12 PM
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jimmyx

greencmp
reply to post by eLPresidente
 

Way to go! California?!

Great news all around and, yes, astonishing to get Democratic support. All good signs for the future of America.



astonishing?...as a California left-of-center resident, I think this is great, as most liberals do. I'll type this in simple words....99% of liberals believe in the constitution too, regardless of what the talking heads of the right tell you.

Cool by me, my ignorance cheerfully denied, I stand corrected!



BTW, this isn't the first time I have agreed with Jerry Brown believe it or not.

Fear and Cronyism in California - Jerry Brown Finds Resistance to Reform
edit on 2-10-2013 by greencmp because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by eLPresidente
 


"It is the policy of this state to refuse to provide material support for or to participate in any way with the implementation within this state of any federal law that purports to authorize indefinite detention of a person within California."

Well and good, but it says nothing about prohibiting the Federales from coming in to California and apprehending an individual. Virginia has a similar statue on the books (§ 8.01-385), which purportedly “Prevents any agency, political subdivision, employee, or member of the military of Virginia from assisting an agency of the armed forces of the United States in the conduct of the investigation, prosecution, or detention of a United States citizen in violation of the United States Constitution, Constitution of Virginia, or any Virginia law or regulation".

Seems to me that recent cause celebre Brandon J. Raub USMC is/was a citizen of The Commonwealth of Virginia, and both federal (FBI,Secret Service) and Virginia (Chesterfield County Police) authorities colluded to apprehend him account 'strident anti-government messages'. Important to note here that he was taken into custody after VA § 8.01-385 was made law, which, if nothing else, points up how meaningless such statues end up being.
edit on 2-10-2013 by lokomotiv23 because: Spacing between words.



posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 03:35 PM
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jimmyx

greencmp
reply to post by eLPresidente
 

Way to go! California?!

Great news all around and, yes, astonishing to get Democratic support. All good signs for the future of America.



astonishing?...as a California left-of-center resident, I think this is great, as most liberals do. I'll type this in simple words....99% of liberals believe in the constitution too, regardless of what the talking heads of the right tell you.


I'm not quite sure about that, the second amendment seems to get special exemption from Constitutional rights status by the liberal crowd.



posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 10:08 PM
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reply to post by lokomotiv23
 


Such a law gives direct power to the Sheriff in this instance. They would and should uphold their States' Constitutional responsibility as an elected official and deny any support in the apprehension and detention of an individual under the NDAA.

That said, there is nothing that would stop a Federal Agency from just taking you in the night under the NDAA provision; you thinking that words on paper would do that shows naivety.



posted on Oct, 2 2013 @ 11:56 PM
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With their history re ww2 and Japanese internment I expected this to happen a lt sooner. I'm just glad any state is starting to undo the nonsense. Under current law though they might not have the authority to undo NDAA.



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 12:22 AM
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reply to post by sjorges2002
 


I'm all against the NDAA, but isn't CA becoming criminal central?

What, with all of your illegal mexican/and whatever else comes across the mexican border - and your letting criminals out of prison early due to overcrowding and now NDAA?

If I lived in CA, which I never would willingly, I'd be a bit concerned about the chinese in the Long Beach harbor, and the maybe near slip into the Pacific due to a man-made catastrophe - or earthquake.

I don't know, I think if your wealthy and connected in CA, you'd e have a home somewhere else to be while all this went down. Doesn't sound pretty.

Chinese are pretty good at dealing with what they consider "outsiders".



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 12:40 AM
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sjorges2002
With their history re ww2 and Japanese internment I expected this to happen a lt sooner. I'm just glad any state is starting to undo the nonsense. Under current law though they might not have the authority to undo NDAA.


They're not undo'ing it, they're nullifying (ignoring) it.

Nullification was used for states that wanted to harbor blacks from the federal government/slave states.


Watch this:




Then watch this documentary:




posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 01:00 AM
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Interestingly enough, this could possibly be used as an end-run around the ACA and enforcement of penalties by the IRS.

... keeping my ears open ....



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 07:01 AM
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reply to post by ownbestenemy
 


Read my post again, if you would; I do not assume that 'words on paper' would stop any authority from taking me (or anyone else) into custody. Quite the opposite.



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 08:02 AM
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reply to post by eLPresidente
 





None of us in California would've ever thought that NDAA nullification would ever be signed into law in a state like California but it just goes to show with the right cause and a strong enough case, you can get the support of even the most corrupt politicians in either party.


well..

of course you can...we all can when the laws effect EVERYONE even those in places of power, albeit, Rep,lib, dem .. mayors, govna's .. esp when it effects their paychecks..



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 08:30 AM
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reply to post by eLPresidente
 


California is a very diverse state. It doesn't surprise me that this legislation came out of California. California is a trend setter, that doesn't follow the marching orders of DC. This is possibly attributable to the fact that in many ways California is the economic power horse of the Nation and could do very well as a country on its own.

You hear much from the right wing that California is a rogue entity, but in fact the State is very difficult to control and make to conform with age old ideologies that have cemented themselves in other State governments. While California continues to push for a better society for its citizenry, other states are rolling back constitutional and economic protections of its population. Certainly, California is liberal, but that liberalism is not confined to the left wing of politics. Rather, there is a healthy adherence to the constitution on many matters and this is shared by all political ideologies.

I have lived in a few states. Currently I reside in North Carolina. However, I am of the opinion that California courts are the most fair in the nation, and the state legislatures actually uses its brains to come up with ways to solve its state problems. Good for California in passing this legislation. It effectively prevents any participation in detaining any of its own citizens indefinitely. Time to move back to California



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 09:21 AM
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reply to post by eLPresidente
 


Its easy to support a bill that is not needed being the US Supreme Court has already ruled on that section of the NDAA, saying it cannot be applied to US citizens...

Either or I applaud the effort...



posted on Oct, 3 2013 @ 01:47 PM
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abecedarian
Interestingly enough, this could possibly be used as an end-run around the ACA and enforcement of penalties by the IRS.

... keeping my ears open ....


Probably only in the red states but I'm definitely open to everyone doing it.





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