Irish people shut down repossession auction

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posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 01:35 PM
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If this happened in the US security would've tackled the protesters and brutalised them on the way out. The bidders would have probably joined in and put the boot into their countrymen and the auction would go on under heavy security.




posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 01:49 PM
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I don't know that Americans could rightfully do this today. Too many people bought homes they could not afford with 'creative mortgages' from the banks.

In this video, if I heard correctly, the home was in his family 110 years. There aren't many Americans who could make this claim today. Most USA citizens in foreclosure are in that mess because they don't actually own the home or they have two mortgages on the property; in which case the banks actually own the property.



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 01:50 PM
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SomethingsJustNotRight
If this happened in the US security would've tackled the protesters and brutalised them on the way out. The bidders would have probably joined in and put the boot into their countrymen and the auction would go on under heavy security.

Have you ever gone toe-to-toe with an angry Irishman?

Oh man, I'd rather stick pins in my eyes.



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 02:16 PM
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I'm Irish and this sort of thing is very much restricted to the rural areas where the sense of community is strong. Also the banks and politicians don't have the will to begin widespread repossessions of all the properties in mortgage arrears.
It would drop the property value of current home-owners (ie. voters) houses even further if a flood of cheap repossessed houses entered the property market for quick sales.

I bought my house for €285k, at the height of the property boom it was valued at €420k, and now it's probably worth around €230k ( after 9 years or so )

Don't applaud the Irish too much, as a nation we're actually quite docile.
We've been hammered by tax increases and public service cuts.

A Cavan cheating entrepreneur called Sean Quinn ( en.wikipedia.org... ) was responsible for everyone in Ireland paying an "insurance levy" to bail his company out.

We've had health levies, ( levy = stealth tax ).
We've had pension levies to pay for the public sectors defined benefits pension schemes, so the private sector workers have the lesser defined contributions schemes, and have to contribute to pay for these lazy state workers pensions.
We've strong public sector unions like the Dublin bus union, trying to hold Dublin hostage to keep their overpaid jobs and pensions for a low IQ job.

Previously, we got free drinking water, now they've started installing meters and people are going to have to pay for drinking water.

They're also introducing a property tax... so home owners will have to pay for the pleasure of owning their own home. Despite the fact that a lot of us paid the 4% stamp duty tax on the sale of the house.
So I had to pay the Govt €15k to buy my house 9 years ago.
This charge starts off around €300, but it's the thin edge of the wedge, and they're sure to beat us with increased charges every year from now on.

Previously, people paid for a television license, if they had a TV.
Now, that most people have registered their details with the state for the property tax, they're going to automatically deduct a "broadcasting charge" to fund the overpaid state TV Channel "RTE".

In the height of the "celtic tiger", when the Irish economy was doing well, they let over 100,000 Africans into the country. We have agreements with the EU to allow the movement of labour across EU states.
But there was no reason to let 100,000 Africans into the country just to fill in the lower paid, lower IQ jobs that the Irish weren't willing to fill at the time.
Now, with high unemployment, they're a further drain on the weak economy and reproducing like rabbits, filling up our local schools.
39% of Nigerians are unemployed and they've an aggressive attitude when they don't get what they want in a shop or politicians office. One politician, a mayor in Naas couldn't handle their aggressiveness and made a public statement to that effect, which brought his career to an abrupt end.

No... the Irish aren't as feisty as our reputation might suggest.

Nobody has been imprisoned in our banking sector for the widespread abuse that bankrupted the country.
Every family now has a young member who is leaving for Australia, New Zealand, America etc...
Ireland has been destroyed by corruption, lax weak willed immigration policies, no financial regulation, no penalties for corrupt officials in fact that tend to get a "golden handshake" payoff to keep quiet.

All the rich and going to the UK and America to declare bankruptcy as it's a shorter term to recovery than in Ireland. While the decent middle classes are stuck with their debts for life, and the "working classes" are on generous social welfare benefits and would be economically worse off if they found a low paying job.

So, all you uninformed people from outside of Ireland should know the truth.
The Irish spirit has been broken a long time, there's no general uprising, it's only the odd case of strong community spirit in rural areas fighting back.
In the housing estates of Dublin, where there's a load of immigrant Africans and Muslims who keep to themselves, the community is fragmented and compartmentalised.



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 07:20 PM
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Now, with high unemployment, they're a further drain on the weak economy and reproducing like rabbits, filling up our local schools.
39% of Nigerians are unemployed and they've an aggressive attitude when they don't get what they want in a shop or politicians office.
reply to post by CreepingDeath
 


As an Irish person I do not agree, we as a people have been viewed like this many times and from many nationalities across the globe at one time or another ( pretty sure that the above statement is what an Englishman would have said about us Irish in the 60's and 70's). I find it derogatory and completely unfair to generalize a particular culture in this way, as an Irishman do you not feel empathy toward immigrants who come here looking for a better life? ( although I admit at the moment they probably wont find it ) In the 60's and 70's England our "neighbour" was a very hard place for an Irish person to find work, signs saying 'No Blacks, No Dogs No Irish' were frequently seen. We as a people need to stop blaming 'immigrants' and start blaming the government.


Every family now has a young member who is leaving for Australia, New Zealand, America etc...


That is not true. I agree lots of people from here have left for Australia and New Zealand etc in the last 10 years but its certainly not one in every family.
Maybe if we stuck together and fought for a proper government instead of blaming immigrants then we could make this country a place where people didnt feel the need to leave in order to find work!



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 08:03 PM
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reply to post by doobydoll
 

This has been coming for some time, and what we want now is for this to snowball, the banks burned to the ground, and some deserving TD's and others tarred and feathered..... Ireland needs a reveloution and the sooner the better..... the People will not tolerate being governed by circus clowns any longer, their salaries have to be reduced to not exceed €75,000 P.A. which includes all expenses.... Ireland want's a tighter ship starting at the top down.... and while we are at it. Can someone explain why trappatoni the italian and soccer manager of the irish fc, got 2fcking million pa.. with 7 more people every day homeless in ireland... how many reasons does anyone need to over throw this countries bull# class distinctive beaurocratic no hopers....... chuck 'em all to the dogs... lets get this moving....and give the irish people their dignity back, that was fought so hard for by their forefathers....



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 08:19 PM
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SomethingsJustNotRight
If this happened in the US security would've tackled the protesters and brutalised them on the way out. The bidders would have probably joined in and put the boot into their countrymen and the auction would go on under heavy security.


If what you say is true. then you are suffering from dictatorship, just like Ireland, but it is coming to a stage where I am hoping so hard, we will have a revolt in every street and town and village and countryside. to see banks reduced to nothing more than a pile of smoldering rubble.... and politicians being made to pay the ultimate penalties for their bull sh1tting of the people of Ireland



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 08:32 PM
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Lady_Tuatha



Now, with high unemployment, they're a further drain on the weak economy and reproducing like rabbits, filling up our local schools.
39% of Nigerians are unemployed and they've an aggressive attitude when they don't get what they want in a shop or politicians office.
reply to post by CreepingDeath
 


As an Irish person I do not agree, we as a people have been viewed like this many times and from many nationalities across the globe at one time or another ( pretty sure that the above statement is what an Englishman would have said about us Irish in the 60's and 70's). I find it derogatory and completely unfair to generalize a particular culture in this way, as an Irishman do you not feel empathy toward immigrants who come here looking for a better life? ( although I admit at the moment they probably wont find it ) In the 60's and 70's England our "neighbour" was a very hard place for an Irish person to find work, signs saying 'No Blacks, No Dogs No Irish' were frequently seen. We as a people need to stop blaming 'immigrants' and start blaming the government.


Every family now has a young member who is leaving for Australia, New Zealand, America etc...


That is not true. I agree lots of people from here have left for Australia and New Zealand etc in the last 10 years but its certainly not one in every family.
Maybe if we stuck together and fought for a proper government instead of blaming immigrants then we could make this country a place where people didnt feel the need to leave in order to find work!


People DONT feel a need to go look elsewhere for work.. The IRISH FCKing GOVERNMENT drove them away, the irish government are having the same effect on the Irish people as the famine... they are corrupt bstrds and we need a reveloution yesterday....and that wouldnt be soon enough.



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 08:36 PM
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I would LOVE to move to Ireland, but 2 things stop me: 1. I couldnt take my son and 2. I'd probably lose my American VA benefits and pension



posted on Sep, 15 2013 @ 08:45 PM
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HomerinNC
I would LOVE to move to Ireland, but 2 things stop me: 1. I couldnt take my son and 2. I'd probably lose my American VA benefits and pension


Through the window it sure looks nice, but atm it's a difficult place to dwell. until we get some movement going to iron out the wrinkled politicians and fumegate the banks... I dont think the answer to irelands problems has been born yet.... its certainly none of the current no hopers



posted on Sep, 16 2013 @ 06:11 AM
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reply to post by HomerinNC
 


Yeah man, pick the right place to move to and there isn't many nicer places on the planet.

I always thought it sucked how American taxes and citizenship worked.
My wife works with an American girl who married a guy from over here and she still has to file a tax return to the US every year even though all of her earnings are made here...crazy stuff, like being a slave for life to Uncle Sam unless you give up your citizenship.



posted on Sep, 16 2013 @ 03:16 PM
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It's only a matter of time.



posted on Sep, 17 2013 @ 02:00 PM
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reply to post by biggilo
 


May be an IRA phrase, but it's also true. Their time will come, and I believe sooner than later. I'm proud of my Irish cousins for taking a stand.



posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 06:52 AM
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reply to post by Billie828
 


Just so I am clear here, whose 'time' are we talking about exactly?



posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 06:53 AM
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edit on 19-9-2013 by biggilo because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 07:49 AM
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wtg IRISH standing tall -
WIllie Nelson would be proud.


I'll go a step further - not only should auctions never happen but usury fees should be legislated off the planet.



posted on Sep, 19 2013 @ 11:56 AM
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reply to post by biggilo
 


Ireland's. I don't mean that the IRA was right in doing what they did, but they did have a point in that little motto. That country won't be beaten down forever.



posted on Sep, 21 2013 @ 06:41 PM
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HomerinNC
I would LOVE to move to Ireland, but 2 things stop me: 1. I couldnt take my son and 2. I'd probably lose my American VA benefits and pension


VA benefits like medical I can understand, but retirement or other financial payments would continue - you're only changing your physical location, you're still entitled to the retirement you earned... If you were a VA employee and not in the military, it should still be the same...
From Military.com

U.S. military retirees living outside the States can now enroll to have their monthly payments directly deposited in their bank accounts.



biggilo
reply to post by HomerinNC
 


Yeah man, pick the right place to move to and there isn't many nicer places on the planet.

I always thought it sucked how American taxes and citizenship worked.
My wife works with an American girl who married a guy from over here and she still has to file a tax return to the US every year even though all of her earnings are made here...crazy stuff, like being a slave for life to Uncle Sam unless you give up your citizenship.


It depends... For example, I am currently living/working in Israel and all my income is from Israel. I DO have to file a US tax return, but I don't have to pay US tax because I pay Israeli tax and the IRS allows you to exclude a certain amount of income (Almost $100k) and expenses.


taxes.about.com...



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 07:55 AM
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Rikku
why are americans so quick to be proud of having some vague connection to ireland or scotland?
(the two least desirable nations on earth might I add).
edit on 14-9-2013 by Rikku because: (no reason given)


How very petty and bitter of you.
We Irish are the most welcoming, friendly, jovial people on this little blue rock.
Even people like you would be welcome, you ignorant half an ass

I am so proud to Irish, nearly brings a tear to my eye when i see video's like this
You'll never beat the Irish



posted on Sep, 22 2013 @ 09:36 AM
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I see a growing trend all over the first world countries, people are all becoming a bunch of entitled p##cks.

These people do not own the homes they live in, they take out a loan with the bank on a home they can't afford to pay cash for then they start crying when the bank take back their property because these people don't pay the bank back at the agreed monthly sum.

Maby they have lost their jobs but that's still not the banks problem.

It's just like if you ownd a car and sold it to some one who agreed to pay you monthly installments for it then at some point they decide not to pay you anymore are you just going to let them keep the car, I don't think so.





 
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