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Secret Agenda in Syria? Larry Summers and Cronies Opening the World to Criminal Banksters

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posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 08:05 AM
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Okay - I'll give this changing website a shot - thought this was a worthwhile viewpoint to post on the Syrian Crises to warrent the attempt.




The “end-game” would require not just coercing support among WTO members but taking down those countries refusing to join. Some key countries remained holdouts from the WTO, including Iraq, Libya, Iran and Syria. In these Islamic countries, banks are largely state-owned; and “usury” – charging rent for the “use” of money – is viewed as a sin, if not a crime. That puts them at odds with the Western model of rent extraction by private middlemen. Publicly-owned banks are also a threat to the mushrooming derivatives business, since governments with their own banks don’t need interest rate swaps, credit default swaps, or investment-grade ratings by private rating agencies in order to finance their operations.





These countries were not all Islamic. Forty percent of banks globally [4] are publicly-owned. They are largely in the BRIC countries—Brazil, Russia, India and China—which house forty percent of the global population. They also escaped the 2008 credit crisis, but they at least made a show of conforming to Western banking rules. This was not true of the “rogue” Islamic nations, where usury was forbidden by Islamic teaching. To make the world safe for usury, these rogue states had to be silenced by other means. Having failed to succumb to economic coercion, they wound up in the crosshairs of the powerful US military.

Here is some data in support of that thesis.




Here's the link: www.alternet.org...

She concludes with:




The Public Bank Alternative

Countries laboring under the yoke of an extractive private banking system are being forced into “structural adjustment” and austerity by their unrepayable debt. But some countries have managed to escape. In the Middle East, these are the targeted “rogue nations.” Their state-owned banks can issue the credit of the state on behalf of the state, leveraging public funds for public use without paying a massive tribute to private middlemen. Generous state funding allows them to provide generously for their people.



and more a great article.

Saw this article by Ellen Brown of the Web of Debt Blog (great source, IMHO) and it rings true. I've always thought that endless war against 'them' was about money and private profit and that any excuse for public intervention (and expense) was being used for private profit.


Don't have much time to comment - off to wage slavery - have fun.
edit on 6-9-2013 by FyreByrd because: (no reason given)
edit on 6-9-2013 by FyreByrd because: (no reason given)




posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 08:14 AM
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reply to post by FyreByrd
 

The banking issue is a very real one.

You see, most of the world has been subjugated by the Rothschild debt based, fiat, central banking scheme.

In direct opposition, the Moslem world has outlawed interest or usury.

THIS is the REAL threat that Sharia law represents. That the world from Western Africa to Indonesia would reject the debt based economy, which is how the banksters are able to enslave one nation after another.

Think Libya was about stopping a "civil war"? Yah right. Guess again:

Libya all about oil, or central banking?


I have never before heard of a central bank being created in just a matter of weeks out of a popular uprising.

Newman quoted CNBC senior editor John Carney, who asked, "Is this the first time a revolutionary group has created a central bank while it is still in the midst of fighting the entrenched political power?

Later, the same general said they planned to take out seven countries in five years: Iraq, Syria, Lebanon, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, and Iran.

What do these seven countries have in common? In the context of banking, one that sticks out is that none of them is listed among the 56 member banks of the Bank for International Settlements (BIS). That evidently puts them outside the long regulatory arm of the central bankers' central bank in Switzerland.


edit on 6-9-2013 by gladtobehere because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 09:08 AM
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As part of the motivation for the current conflict, the evidence is strong enough to take seriously. On a personal stand point I do like usury being forbidden.

As a national policy position, it did protect these nations as the GFC mess fell apart. The Western and Islamic nations also have different needs and conditions with their local economies. In a smaller nation there is not the need for private rating agencies as the government is able to maintain the situation. As the country grows and the management of funding issues becomes more prevalent then better infrastructure for economic management is required. With the West already exploring some of the options with increasing public productivity, it does provide some framework for the Islamic nations look at when upgrading their economic systems.

If the world is really to sort out all these economic policy problems then the battlefield must remain in the academic arena for the best answers to rise to the top. If we use strength and force to resolve these complex issues then the outcome will be tough, but not too bright. Public order does not respond too well to strong economic changes. Is there a good reason why economic change in these Islamic nations must happen so quickly? It has been keeping them going for thousands of years, from the economic dramas the west is going though it is very reasonable to be hesitant with this middle man.



posted on Sep, 6 2013 @ 09:16 AM
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reply to post by FyreByrd
 


Interesting article and it could be one of several motivating factors for the continued efforts to destabilize the Syrian conflict.

However, I still firmly believe that if indeed this conflict in Syria and others in the Middle East are being perpetuated for profit, then I would have to say the resource wealth would still be the primary focus. The new explorations of the fields on the Golen Heights, the contested area which borders Syria and the entire region laden with mineral wealth has made the Middle East a target for decades.

However, if you wished to eventually higher forms of control of foreign populations, what better way then to control their banks and their money.



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 02:06 PM
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reply to post by FyreByrd
 


i garner most of my worthwhile articles from a site called www.321gold.com...
its set up a pretty good menu of reports & articles in over 8 categories....every day


i'll give Web Of Debt Blog a look see



posted on Sep, 9 2013 @ 09:11 PM
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reply to post by FyreByrd
 


Great catch. Thanks so much for posting it. Seems to me the thesis is dead-on and just missing the part about indenturing/enslaving workers in the Western world through inescapable debt.

S&F.



posted on Sep, 11 2013 @ 02:32 PM
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The elite are xNTx's. They don't think linearly, or do anything on the global scale for any one reason, unless that reason is damned well worth it. Thinking that it's a and not b, is inferior to thinking it's a + b + c all at once.

a = petrodollar

b = resources

c = banking

there could very well be several more to add into this list, but these three seem to be the most talked about.

in order of importance due to the current and future state of affairs, I'd say:

a > b > c

one last thing, and please correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't the fact that these countries have the means to stay within their own country to finance their needs the exact reason why these countries are not a part of the BIS? Isn't the BIS a means to install a western central bank with usury AFTER the nation has become bankrupt and needs outside support?! Then the oil/gas would be intertwined with the fact that they have their own banking system.
edit on 11-9-2013 by webedoomed because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 13 2013 @ 08:13 AM
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webedoomed

one last thing, and please correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't the fact that these countries have the means to stay within their own country to finance their needs the exact reason why these countries are not a part of the BIS? Isn't the BIS a means to install a western central bank with usury AFTER the nation has become bankrupt and needs outside support?! Then the oil/gas would be intertwined with the fact that they have their own banking system.
edit on 11-9-2013 by webedoomed because: (no reason given)


That's my limited understanding of the facts; but then I'm a big one for decentralization (not de=regulation which leads, in all systems, to centraization).

I was hoping to tease out more information on this "plan" to take out non BIS countries with this thread and it's failed. I'd like to learn more about it, and I heard and read things from time to time but nothing so concise as this.





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