Air Canada 898 squawking Hijack/Military Intercept Request - Link

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posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 08:43 AM
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off-topic post removed to prevent thread-drift


 




posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 09:31 AM
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Flightradar and Flightaware, and all of those can only track flights when there is an ADS-B receiver in the area. A lot of the flight track they post is conjecture based on the speed of the aircraft at the time it went out of range of the last receiver. In fact a couple of sites have recently asked for people to put receivers up at their homes for them to get better coverage. After the flight crosses into the Atlantic until it gets near Greenland, there is no transponder network. Flight following is a matter of the plane sending in a report, usually over datalink, "I'm at point Yankee now" until they get into a controlled area.

The most likely scenario here is that they went comms out (missed a frequency change), which happens a lot (I get at least two to three 7600s a day on my alerts), and put the wrong code in. It's also possible that they were having a transponder issue and went for 7700, but I doubt it. It's a lot easier to put in the wrong code when it's one off, rather than when it's two.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 09:45 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


No no no you are wrong you are just jealous because you missed all the fun hah just kidding you are probably (very likely) correct of what happen. The thread was fun I got no work done at all today purely because of this thread



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 11:00 AM
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reply to post by ThePeaceMaker
 



I tend to get aircraft stacking over my house for heathrow depending on what time of day it is. I'm in Essex which is just east of London. Early mornings I tend to get the a380s a340s 747s 777s from Hong Kong and Dubai areas stacking over my house. Seeing an a380 banking at a slow speed amazes me how it hasn't fallen out the sky

Edit: doing work sucks!
The worst case scenarios is to have a plane full of terrorist including passengers, crew members and security officers as a premeditated action.
That will be something unstoppable.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 12:05 PM
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Sincerely hoping this is operator error, or a communication error, and not a hijacking. It would seem a little odd for a group to try and take control of an aircraft that far from anything they could damage with said Aircraft.

I suppose they could have thought the crew couldn't get outside help, or tell anyone they were being hijacked, but from a guerrilla/terrorist stand point, it would make more sense to take action closer to your target, or at least a point where you can make your demands heard. Middle of the ocean is just silly.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 12:12 PM
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reply to post by Hijinx
 


The aircraft landed 24 minutes late in London. It was pretty close to the expected route at all portions of flight, with a couple very minor deviations.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 12:51 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Excellent, I didn't realize how late I was to the thread until after I went back and read a few pages. I'm glad it was all good, do we know why they were squawking 7500? or 0000? Could 0000 have been a default and when the aircraft was out of range of the receivers it defaulted to that code?



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 12:58 PM
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reply to post by Hijinx
 


Most likely they were going for 7600 (comms out), and missed and didn't realize it. As for the 0000 yeah, I think that's the most likely explanation. Since it doesn't know what code it's got set, it defaults until it can update.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 01:04 PM
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..... And this was reported...

Hi-jacking?



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 01:06 PM
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reply to post by tracehd1
 


Which turned out to be a disgruntled passenger on a totally different flight causing the airport to be closed.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 01:26 PM
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What squawk codes would you say that could be interesting to keep and eye out for thinking about putting alerts on my phone



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 01:30 PM
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reply to post by ThePeaceMaker
 


I usually just use 7600 and 7700 right now. There aren't enough military planes being tracked right now to use any of the military codes.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 02:10 PM
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I was following this closely. I am glad to see all turned out well. Everyone always does great detective work.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 02:20 PM
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I posted this earlier but couldn't get the link straight, but I fixed it so here you go squawk codes for those who want to know what they are..


Code Assignments[edit source | editbeta]
Beacon Code Allocated Use
0000
Shall not be used — is a non-discrete mode A code (Europe)[11]
Mode C or other SSR failure (UK)[12]
Should never be assigned (USA)[13]
Military intercept code (USA)[14]
Internal ARTCC subsets assigned by En Route Safety and Operations Support (Discrete codes only except for first primary block to be used as non-discrete if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
0021
VFR squawk code for airspace 5000 feet and below — from 15 March 2007 replaced by the international 7000 code for VFR traffic (Germany)[15]
0022
VFR squawk code for airspace (above 5000 feet) — from 15 March 2007 replaced by the international 7000 code for VFR traffic (Germany)[15]
0033
Parachute dropping in progress (UK)[12]
0041-0057
Assigned for VFR traffic under Flight Information Services (BXL FIC) (Belgium)
0100
Flights operating at aerodromes (in lieu of codes 1200, 2000 or 3000 when assigned by ATC or noted in the Enroute Supplement Australia) (Australia)[16]
0100-0400
Allocated to Service Area Operations for assignment for use by Terminal/CERAP/Industry/Unique Purpose/Experimental Activities (USA)[13]
0100-0700
Non-discrete code assignments in accordance with FAA Order JO 7110.65, 5-2 *Also for use in oceanic airspace, unless another code is assigned by ATC (USA)[13]
0500, 0600, 0700
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
1000
Instrument Flight Rules (IFR) flight below 18,000' when no other code has been assigned (Canada)[6]
Non-discrete mode A code reserved use in Mode S radar/ADS-B environment where the aircraft identification will be used to correlate the flight plan instead of the mode A code (ICAO)[11]
Used exclusively by ADS-B aircraft to inhibit Mode 3A transmit (USA)[13]
Non-discrete code assignments in accordance with FAA Order JO 7110.65, 5-2 *Also for use in oceanic airspace, unless another code is assigned by ATC (USA)[13]
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
1100
Non-discrete code assignments in accordance with FAA Order JO 7110.65, 5-2 *Also for use in oceanic airspace, unless another code is assigned by ATC (USA)[13]
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
1200
Civil VFR flights in class E or G airspace (Australia )[16]
Visual flight rules (VFR) flight, this is the standard squawk code used in North American airspace when no other has been assigned (Canada and USA)[6][13]
1201
Visual flight rules (VFR) glider operations for gliders not in contact with ATC, through February 2012 (USA)[17]
Assigned via FAR 93.95 for use by VFR aircraft in the immediate vicinity of LAX (USA)[13]
1202
Visual flight rules (VFR) glider operations for gliders not in contact with ATC; effective February 2012 (USA)[13][17]
1203-1272
Discrete 1200 series codes, unless otherwise allocated (for example, 1255), designated for DVFR aircraft and only assigned by FSS (USA)[13]
1255
Aircraft not in contact with an ATC facility while en route to/from or within the designated fire fighting area(s) (USA)[13][18]
1273-1275
Calibration Performance Monitoring Equipment (CPME) “Parrot” transponders (USA)[13]
1276
Air Defense Identification Zone (ADIZ) penetration when unable to establish communication with ATC or aeronautical facility (USA)[13]
1277
VFR aircraft which fly authorized SAR missions for the USAF or USCG while en route to/from or within the designated search area (USA)[13][18]
1300
Non-discrete code assignments in accordance with FAA Order JO 7110.65, 5-2 *Also for use in oceanic airspace, unless another code is assigned by ATC (USA)[13]
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
1400
VFR flight above 12,500'ASL when no other code has been assigned (Canada)[6]
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
1500
Non-discrete code assignments in accordance with FAA Order JO 7110.65, 5-2 *Also for use in oceanic airspace, unless another code is assigned by ATC (USA)[13]
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
1600, 1700
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
2000
Civil IFR flights in Class G airspace (Australia)[16]
Uncontrolled IFR at or above 18,000' (Canada)[6]
The code to be squawked when entering a secondary surveillance radar (SSR) area from a non-SSR area used as Uncontrolled IFR flight squawk code(ICAO countries)[11]
Non-discrete code assignments in accordance with FAA Order JO 7110.65, 5-2 *Also for use in oceanic airspace, unless another code is assigned by ATC (USA)[13]
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
VFR standard squawk code when no other code has been assigned (Finland)[citation needed]
2100
Ground testing by aircraft maintenance staff (Australia)[16]
Non-discrete code assignments in accordance with FAA Order JO 7110.65, 5-2 *Also for use in oceanic airspace, unless another code is assigned by ATC (USA)[13]
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
2200, 2300, 2400
Non-discrete code assignments in accordance with FAA Order JO 7110.65, 5-2 *Also for use in oceanic airspace, unless another code is assigned by ATC (USA)[13]
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
2500, 2600, 2700
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
3000
Civil flights in classes A, C and D airspace, or IFR flights in Class E airspace (Australia)[16]
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
3100, 3200, 3300, 3400, 3500, 3600, 3700
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
4000
Civil flights not involved in special operations or SAR, operating in Class G airspace in excess of 15NM offshore (Australia)[16]
Aircraft on a VFR Military Training Route or requiring frequent or rapid changes in altitude (USA)[19]
Non-discrete code assignments in accordance with FAA Order JO 7110.65, 5-2 *Also for use in oceanic airspace, unless another code is assigned by ATC (USA)[13]
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
4100
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
4200, 4300
Internal ARTCC subsets assigned by En Route Safety and Operations Support (Discrete codes only except for first primary block to be used as non-discrete if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
4400-4477
Reserved for use by SR-71, YF-12, U-2 and B-57, pressure suit flights, and aircraft operations above FL600 (USA)[13][19]
4401-4433
Reserved in accordance with FAA Order JO 7110.67 (Fed Law Enforcement) (USA)[13]
4434-4437
Weather reconnaissance, as appropriate (USA)[13]
4440-4441
Operations above FL600 for Lockheed/NASA from Moffett Field (USA)[13]
4442-4446
Operations above FL600 for Lockheed from Air Force Plant 42 (USA)[13]
4447-4452
Operations above FL600 for SR-71/U-2 operations from Edwards AFB (USA)[13]
4453
High balloon operations – National Scientific Balloon Facility, Palestine TX, and other providers, some in international operations (USA)[13]
4454-4465
Air Force operations above FL600 as designated in FAA Order 7610.4 (USA)[13]
4466-4477
Reserved in accordance with FAA Order JO 7110.67 (Fed Law Enforcement) (USA)[13]
4500, 4600, 4700
Internal ARTCC subsets assigned by En Route Safety and Operations Support (Discrete codes only except for first primary block to be used as non-discrete if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
5000
Aircraft flying on military operations (Australia)[16]
5000
Reserved for use by NORAD (USA and Canada)[13]
5061-5062, 5100, 5200
Reserved for special use by Potomac TRACON (USA)[13]
5100, 5200, 5300, 5500
Internal ARTCC subsets assigned by En Route Safety and Operations Support (Discrete codes only except for first primary block to be used as non-discrete if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
5100-5300
May be used by DOD aircraft beyond radar coverage but inside US controlled airspace with coordination as appropriate with applicable Area Operations Directorate (USA)[13]
5400
Reserved for use by NORAD (USA and Canada)[13]
5600, 5700
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
6000
Military flights in Class G airspace (Australia)[16]
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
6100
Reserved for use by NORAD (USA and Canada)[13]
6200, 6300
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
6400
Reserved for use by NORAD(USA and Canada)[13]
6500, 6600, 6700
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
7000
VFR standard squawk code when no other code has been assigned (ICAO)[11]
This code does not imply VFR; 7000 is used as a general conspicuity squawk (UK)[12]
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
7001
Used in some countries to identify VFR traffic (France)
Sudden military climb out from low-level operations (UK)[12]
7004
Aerobatic and display code in some countries (UK)[12]
7010
VFR circuit traffic code in the UK
7070-7077
Paradrop activities (France)
7100, 7200, 7300, 7400
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
7500
Aircraft hijacking (ICAO, worldwide)[6][13]
7501-7577
Reserved for use by Continental NORAD Region (CONR) (USA)[13]
7600
Radio Failure (Lost Communications) (ICAO, worldwide)[6][13]
7601-7607
Reserved for special use by FAA (USA)[13]
7610-7676
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
7615
Civil flights engaged in littoral surveillance (Australia)[16]
7700
Emergency (ICAO, worldwide)[6][13]
7701-7707
Reserved for special use by FAA (USA)[13]
7710-7776
External ARTCC subsets (Discrete codes of blocks only except for first primary block, which is used as the ARTCC’s non-discrete code if all discrete codes are assigned) (USA)[13]
7777
Non-discrete code used by fixed test transponders (RABMs) to check correctness of radar stations (BITE) (Belgium, Germany, Netherlands, USA)
DOD interceptor aircraft on active air defense missions and operating without ATC clearance in accordance with FAA Order 7610.4 (USA)[13][20]


en.wikipedia.org...
edit on 2-9-2013 by tsurfer2000h because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 02:49 PM
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Hmmm.....alternative conspiracy theory.....

The plane was hijacked so the passengers could be infected with a delayed response version of the zombie virus. Right now all over London people are becoming the walking dead.

Other then that i suppose i understand why they took the display of that code off Flightradar.....interesting though, i wonder how many times a plane has sent out its "hijack" signal mistakenly and how many times it has been a real situation that has simply been "handled"
edit on 2-9-2013 by Thorneblood because: (no reason given)



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 02:52 PM
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Thorneblood
i wonder how many times a plane has sent out its "hijack" signal mistakenly and how many times it has been a real situation that has simply been "handled"


Not many, none. There has been no way to "handle" it short of bringing the entire plane down for years. Even now the odds of being on a plane with an air marshal on board are very small.



posted on Sep, 2 2013 @ 03:26 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Unless Aliens are transporting onto planes to use as shuttles to earth and the minds of all the people on board are being wiped of their memories.

Cmon, we know it happens. Stories like that don't just stick around for thirty years because of stupidity



posted on Sep, 3 2013 @ 12:56 PM
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what's your point?



posted on Sep, 3 2013 @ 04:24 PM
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Anybody know if Flight radar 24 does track military flights ? If not know of one that does



posted on Sep, 3 2013 @ 05:08 PM
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reply to post by MajorAce
 


Flight radar doesn't track military at the moment, it tracks some. The military is going to put in ADS-B transponders in all their aircraft soon, after that they will be able to be tracked. Currently it's only the ones with those transponders that can be tracked.





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