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Would you post your DNA on Facebook?

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posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 11:59 AM
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First off, I dont do Facebook. If I did, I would soooo not be giving them my DNA




We are all Henrietta Lacks. Or, according to privacy experts, we soon could be.
Americans are giving their DNA to companies that research their family origins, scientists say, without thinking through the potential long-term consequences.

This week, the National Institutes of Health said it reached a landmark agreement to protect the privacy of the family of Henrietta Lacks, who died in 1951. Since her death, Lacks’s cancer cells and DNA have been used as the basis for as many as 74,000 scientific papers. For decades, the Lacks family had no idea her cells were being used in experiments around the world. Since finding out, they’ve expressed concern about what Lacks’s genes could reveal about her extended family. The new agreement acknowledges Lacks as the source of the “HeLa” cells, and restricts public access to her — and, by extension, her family’s — genetic information.


I see this as being the easiest and slickest way the govt can get your DNA




In a worst-case scenario, the data could be misplaced or hacked, says Harvard Medical School genetics professor George Church, founder of the Personal Genome Project, which aims to sequence and publicize the complete genomes of 100,000 volunteers. But many companies that promise they won’t sell information to third parties can invite third parties to work on internal research — without breaking that privacy policy. “Even if they only let 50 people look at your DNA,” he says, “you still don’t know who they are.”


A couple of clicks, some law enforcement agency can use your DNA to close cold cases, pinning the crime on YOU.

Nope, noones getting a sample of my DNA

ETA: forgot to add the link:
Story
edit on 8/10/2013 by HomerinNC because: (no reason given)




posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 12:15 PM
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Well...yeah, I actually might. BUT!! Under one condition: it is translated to another medium, such as artwork or music. If I can turn my genetic code into a symphony, that's a much better reason to post it on Facebook. And at that point, good luck using my DNA as evidence for a crime scene.



posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 12:42 PM
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Talk about the opportunity for identity theft once cloning gets popular

1 Person could form his own gang.



posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 01:43 PM
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I wouldn't post my grocery list, but I am rabid about my privacy. Some friends and family members enjoy FB. Others use it only when they must for professional reasons. For those who have "free" fan pages, FB wants to charge a fee (starting at $50 a day) or updates will only reach a small percentage. I see more and more bloggers using FB as a way to boost their followers, but at the same time, they are giving "live" updates from Home Depot, which seems like way too much info to be sharing. It's not far-fetched to imagine a future time when someone posts heir DNA and fans/friends "like" it.



posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 01:45 PM
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no thanks...

II



posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 01:57 PM
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the facebook crew will be jumping through hoops to post it they post the details of their last bowel movement for all to see and lets be honest most of the young ones do not have a lot going on upstairs .

murder the wife post it straight to facebook big facepalm



posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 02:05 PM
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Fed's already have my DNA, part of having been in the military.

But no, i would not post my DNA on FB. Some people are so clueless.



posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 03:09 PM
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I'm sure the Feds would be able to easily gain access to that information on me if they don't already have it filed away.

I developed a somewhat unusual form of cancer back when I was 29, that primarily occurs in males over 40. I was extremely lucky because it is often found when it is too late for the lack of symptoms but I was pregnant when it was found and well my daughter saved my life before she was born by causing the tumor to hemorrhage. I ended up going through immunotherapy which was a whole lot easier than chemo and have been clear since

I think it was around 7 or 8 years ago my Dr talked to me about a new test that would determine the chances of the cancer returning (as this cancer can at any time without you knowing), it involved DNA testing.

For that piece of mind it was worth it.



posted on Aug, 10 2013 @ 03:22 PM
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reply to post by HomerinNC
 


I don't do facebook either, but if I did, I wouldn't put a picture of my neigbours cat on it, let alone any personal details, and definately and absolutely no way would I post my DNA, Why don't governments just get it over with and format our brain and re-program us,,, then again they are probably onto that as I type... it seems every day governments are squeezing and squeezing us more and more, taking chunks out of our liberty... not that we have much as it is....



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