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Planck Space Data Yields Evidence of Universes Beyond Our Own

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posted on May, 19 2013 @ 07:44 PM
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Plank Report


Data gathered by the European Space Agency's Planck spacecraft enabled researchers to map the "cosmic microwave" of background radiation left behind when the universe began 13.8 billion years ago. The findings imply the universe could be just one of billions, or even an infinite number, they say. The map showed anomalies that cosmologists believe could only have been caused by the gravitational pull of other universes outside our own. "These anomalies were caused by other universes pulling on our universe as it formed during the Big Bang," said Laura Mersini-Houghton, of the University of North Carolina. "They are the first hard evidence for the existence of other universes that we have seen."


Very cool findings, just thought I would post it in case others hadn't seen it. There further we look back, the more questions we seem to discover.

I wonder if their findings are actually the result of what they say. Space just got WAY bigger if they are right.




posted on May, 19 2013 @ 07:51 PM
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Wait... if the universes are completely separate from our own, how does their gravity affect ours? If they can affect our own universe, wouldn't that mean they aren't separate, but part of the same general "space"?



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 07:56 PM
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reply to post by 3NL1GHT3N3D1
 


I think it depends on your definition of universe. In common usage the universe is the totality of all existence, but in some more scientific language it is limited to observable existence.



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 07:58 PM
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Perhaps they are speaking of irregularities in the forming of our own universe which could only be caused by the gravty of a whole other universe.......as opposed to the gravty of our own en toto



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 08:01 PM
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reply to post by Slugworth
 


If universe means totality of existence, that means there is no such things as other universes because if there were, our universe wouldn't be the totality of existence. Basically, there can't be more than one totality.

Interesting find nonetheless.



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 08:02 PM
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Originally posted by stirling
Perhaps they are speaking of irregularities in the forming of our own universe which could only be caused by the gravty of a whole other universe.......as opposed to the gravty of our own en toto


I think that is what they are saying. There must be some abnormalities in the background radiation that suggest outside influences at the moment of the Big Bang. What exactly was outside the Big Bang begs the question: What is that something other than our Universe?



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 08:12 PM
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reply to post by 3NL1GHT3N3D1
 


I think of it like this: 20k years ago if an observer were to describe "the whole world" they not necessarily be thinking about the planet earth. They may have only been referring to the farthest point that had been observed. If their village was surrounded by mountain ranges and no knowledge remained of their migration to that point then "the whole world" was whatever was accessible and observable to them. For their purposes describing that valley as "the whole world" is linguistically correct despite its geographic inaccuracy because what is happening outside of that range is irrelevant to them at that time. What we currently refer to as the universe, and define as the totality of existence, is probably not really the totality of existence but the totality of our abstract concept of existence.



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 08:29 PM
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Originally posted by 3NL1GHT3N3D1
Wait... if the universes are completely separate from our own, how does their gravity affect ours? If they can affect our own universe, wouldn't that mean they aren't separate, but part of the same general "space"?


That would be like saying, well how can galaxies affect each other? Aren't they separate entities?

Sure they are, but they still exert force on each other. If this finding is true, then it would mean that at least some forces in nature are 'universal', such as gravity... and that yes, as you said, it is all a part of a larger universe.

I think we may need to add a Type VI civilization to the list, one that can harness the power of the universes, plural.


Edit: Looked it up, I guess that would all fall under Type V civilization...
Kardashev Scale
edit on 19-5-2013 by Kharron because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 08:33 PM
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reply to post by pavil
 

Well, in a perfect world (or universe) this would be the headline story in all the papers, websites, and cable news. It should dominate the news, like the crazies dominate it when they get mean, with nonstop coverage for two or three days.

Historical news. Thanks for posting it.



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 08:39 PM
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reply to post by pavil
 

Maybe that's why we see UFO/USOs....going in and out of other universes



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 08:52 PM
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Would it freak anyone out to think that maybe we are living on a higgs boson within a quark solar system, within an electron galaxy, within an atomic galaxy cluster, within a universe molecule in someone else's reality?

Just a thought.



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 09:08 PM
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Of course that is only if these separate universes follow the same laws of physics . . .

Of course this is a completely irrational response from the scientific community seeing as they don't even know what gravity is . . .

Other than that, COOL.



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 09:23 PM
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Very cool.

Think of our universe as a bubble among other bubbles.Then you go,where did all these bubbles come from?



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 09:26 PM
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From what I gather; universe = everything (matter/energy/force) created via the big bang. If there is something outside the big bang, that would be other universes (as far as current theories go). These latest findings point towards the notion that some force outside of what was created due to the big bang is interacting with our universe.



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 09:39 PM
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Great topic op. I really enjoy looking back in our history and seeing how far we have come in learning about our universe. With our technology today, it seems like we are finding out something new every day.



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 09:43 PM
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Very cool find.

When do we leave?



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 09:44 PM
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Originally posted by 3NL1GHT3N3D1
Wait... if the universes are completely separate from our own, how does their gravity affect ours? If they can affect our own universe, wouldn't that mean they aren't separate, but part of the same general "space"?


Look at it like skittles in a bag, in a case of other packs of skittles, in a warehouse with more cases of skittles.



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 09:46 PM
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Okay, this IS ATS.....and so, someone has to ask. It might as well be me. We've all seen what it looks like when galaxies overlap and merge. At least the artist renderings of what Astronomy tells us has happened out there.

So...Are these Universes moving in tandem and balance? Away from each other? ...or do they kinda 'overlap' occasionally? What would that look like? Call it the curious in me...but what is speed relative to when it's between objects with their own identity on scales that large? Something tells me these aren't all happy ending answers.

Like I said... It is ATS. Someone has to ask the big questions.



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 10:30 PM
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Originally posted by Wrabbit2000
We've all seen what it looks like when galaxies overlap and merge. At least the artist renderings of what Astronomy tells us has happened out there.

So...Are these Universes moving in tandem and balance? Away from each other? ...or do they kinda 'overlap' occasionally? What would that look like?


Are they even in the same space-time? Or does that model even fit anymore? I thought the big bang supposedly happened in something that doesn't really fit the concept of space-time and that our universe is expanding "into" something that really can't even be imagined, since the universe is believed to be scope of our space-time.

The new data that the gravity of other universes may be affecting our own indicates some interaction between universes. If there really are as many dimensions as some physicists hypothesize, perhaps we are not actually separated in one or more of those dimensions. So the effect we perceive as gravity would simply be how we perceive interaction or connectedness within that dimension.

Using the model of gravity warping space-time like a ball sinking into a 2-dimensional space, making it 3-dimensional, maybe the dimension in which the warping occurs is common between some or all of these universes.

It's really hard to picture any of this without imagining it based on models of space-time dimensions we can perceive.



posted on May, 19 2013 @ 11:24 PM
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reply to post by pavil
 


This is weird - several hours after you put up a thread outlining the first physical proof that there are other universes besides ours (which seemed obvious after the findings that everything in our 'verse was accelerating rather than slowing down, "everything" here being pulled by the stronger gravity of other universes) it has what, 7 flags???? So one of the biggest stories in human history and in the history of astronomy gets dozens of less flags than your average Mars rock or when a character of an 18-year old girl becomes a member.

First physical evidence of the existence of many, perhaps billions, of universes outside of the one we've been exploring all this time. I wish I had more flags and stars and geese to give ya.






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