Play video without plug-ins? Mozilla-OTOY codec turns tide

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posted on May, 6 2013 @ 05:47 PM
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another win for the free and open web is when we get the option of user codecs that are free and unencumbered by patents and complicated contracts, here is such an example.


(Phys.org) —Mozilla and Los Angeles-based graphics software company OTOY have announced ORBX.js, a downloadable HD codec written in JavaScript and WebGL, that will let major browsers such as Firefox, IE10, Chrome, Safari, and Opera run video and rendering apps like Autodesk without the need for plug-ins. Is there a day to come when end users can access high definition content that is format-agnostic? In tech jargon, it is tempting for company promoters to exaggerate an announcement as "game-changing," but the May 3 news on the codec could be a game changer in a number of ways. PRBX.js will deliver movies and "cloud" gaming in a browser window using web standard-based technologies. It lets developers stream desktop apps for Windows, Linux, and Mac OS X on to any browser including mobile browsers. As important, there will be no need for plug-ins such as Flash, Silverlight, or QuickTime for running videos in the browser.

Read more at: phys.org...


phys.org...

the way the intenet works at the moment you have to use third party programs to play video or stream content that you wish to consume, because the content is streamed using other peoples patents, there are restrictions on who and when the content can be consumed.

the idea of the open web is where everything you need is native to the internet in its desgn so that any user can consume content.

this new method of porting a java application into the web browser will unlock all sorts of functions and make them all available to any device with a compliant browser,

and the best part is that there are no Proprietary codecs used.

this means that the web is now able to stream content to you without requiring massive computing power, costly codecs and proprietary patented hardware decoders.

what this means for services supplied to the consumer, is that you will be able to spool up resources and connections to all sorts of content using an adaptive codec, that works just as fast as other codecs, while being totally unencumbered to third parties.

it is a simple yet elegant use of browser extensions (canvas) and light weight yet portable java applications and the power of transport codecs to deliver any number of services in "real time".

with other high Performance transport algorithms this type of functionality could change the way people consume content on the internet. it will also shake up the content industry as now anyone anywhere can stream a personalised movie or song. or connect to a service that requires remote connections, through the browser.

web apps will now be able to compete with the walled gardens of the large platforms,
and on the open web accessible to everyone.

xploder




posted on May, 6 2013 @ 06:32 PM
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I think this is a great thing. This will make my portable and live operating systems either faster to compile or at least can make them smaller. I can think of a few more reasons this is a good thing but I think I can see one downside so far. Thanks op for bringing the attention here.



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 06:37 PM
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One happy firefox user here, but I am very ignorant on the tech side so I am posting this to see what comes my way via this thread....

Much appreciated your thread is.

S&F

Waiting in the wings for the techo stuff and hopefully in layman's terms:-)

Regards, Iwinder



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 07:10 PM
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Originally posted by Iwinder
One happy firefox user here, but I am very ignorant on the tech side so I am posting this to see what comes my way via this thread....

Much appreciated your thread is.

S&F

Waiting in the wings for the techo stuff and hopefully in layman's terms:-)

Regards, Iwinder


ill try to give a non techie over view for you,

orbx.js looks to be a light weight portable java script application that is supplied up to the user over http or https directly to the web browser.

it uses the client side CPU and in some cases GPU to provide processing power to "decode" a codec that encodes the stream into a format that allows for mixed mode decoding of video or streaming content.

because this is done in the browser rather than (native) to the computer the codec can be changed at will and changes can be implemented without having to change the hardware decoder.

the ability to deploy application specific transports allow for services to be streamed to the browser software decoder and displayed directly to the screen.

there is a bit of a trick to get frames to stream at a redundant rate so that dropped frames dont cause slow down.
and the codec is about 25% faster than then the closed source replacement h265

the interesting thing about this is that any supported web browser can render graphics on a server and stream the results directly to the screen, in a format that is high quality and low overhead.

this means that most internet connected devices with browsers will now be able to stream virtually any service from games to movies and rendering can be done on dedicated hardware with streaming "views" of the rendered product.

the most interesting thing i have seen so far is that VM machines can be "communicated" with over this transport and that will give people the ability to spool up a VM box so that customers can use any device to access their VM and work directly from the cloud in a real world scenario where resources can be increased/decreased on demand.

imagine your desktop in the cloud, and being able to move your VM instance to any cloud provider close to your location.

and your VM can render, compute and stream services directly to your screen.

interesting times....

xploder



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 07:21 PM
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The only risk could be that there has been some recent news about the security of java. The only question I would have is this: Is there a possibility that using a _javascript player could introduce security threats?

I guess the only way to be sure is to run your firefox in a sandbox if you're using windows, only if your antivirus software allows that option. If you're running linux, make sure that firefox is protected by app-armor for linux. Just to be on the safe side.

I think this is a fantastic announcement. Flash has been good for many years, but it is far outdated in my opinion. I do hope that the company that is doing this and teaming up with Mozilla will stay up to date with security patches. As long as they do that, it sounds like it will be far superior to Flash.

The biggest thing I dislike is when I am watching a long clip on a website, and Flash decides to crash. That forces a page refresh, and you have to find your spot in the video you were watching from the beginning. Hopefully this will be more stable than the alternative(s).



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 08:22 PM
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I thought this might be helpful:


How does the OTOY technology get installed on the end user’s machines? If a user views OTOY content on a system without the OTOY runtime (i.e. it is a virgin machine), OTOY will then install itself almost instantly through a stub mechanism (usually between 30-100k ) that is downloaded just once (with no more than one click required by the user to install).

Users on thin machines (i.e. old cell phones), that cannot support the native client, would instead be routed to a virtual session of the application, hosted by an available node on the P2P network that scales the content for the thin device in real time.

On a system where the native OTOY client is installed, the runtime renders the content seamlessly within the host application (as an overlay, palette, embedded frame, etc.). The user never has to quit an application, restart the machine, leave a web page, or do anything other than click ‘OK’. All further updates to the engine are handled transparently.


See the linked white paper for more info: OTOY Technology White Paper

What's interesting about this is that it is P2P based. It sounds like it could be far more efficient than the current technology . I just wanted to link that part of the white paper to show ATS how it installs. What's interesting is that I'm understanding that this will work on any application including IE, web phones, etc. It could be a game changer.



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 08:24 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 



Ok buddy, that was NOT non-techie.


but it was an awesome description nontheless.



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 08:44 PM
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Originally posted by InFriNiTee
The only risk could be that there has been some recent news about the security of java. The only question I would have is this: Is there a possibility that using a _javascript player could introduce security threats?


java and java script or two different things, the security updates for java were huge last month,
and this is a "compact" _javascript language.


I guess the only way to be sure is to run your firefox in a sandbox if you're using windows, only if your antivirus software allows that option. If you're running linux, make sure that firefox is protected by app-armor for linux. Just to be on the safe side.


with all new technology precautions should be followed, but browsers are reasonably secure these days.
i have been using chrome up till now and have moved to firefox to test some of the demos

very impressive



I think this is a fantastic announcement. Flash has been good for many years, but it is far outdated in my opinion. I do hope that the company that is doing this and teaming up with Mozilla will stay up to date with security patches. As long as they do that, it sounds like it will be far superior to Flash.


bye bye flash and silver light, hello simple adaptable streaming content without plugins.


The biggest thing I dislike is when I am watching a long clip on a website, and Flash decides to crash. That forces a page refresh, and you have to find your spot in the video you were watching from the beginning. Hopefully this will be more stable than the alternative(s).


it is and the "seek" function i saw was very impressive


HD streaming videos and games


xploder



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 08:55 PM
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reply to post by InFriNiTee
 



What's interesting about this is that it is P2P based. It sounds like it could be far more efficient than the current technology . I just wanted to link that part of the white paper to show ATS how it installs. What's interesting is that I'm understanding that this will work on any application including IE, web phones, etc. It could be a game changer.


as far as i know all the major web browsers will support html5 with support for canvas and this form of browser connection,
that means that anything with a screen and browser will be able to be used like a thin client or streaming decoder (native) that will allow an almost endless list of supported hardware, without having to "port" the underlying software over to every platform.

a web app of this nature can be written once for all devices and the nature of the stream allows for many display sizes/configurations without dedicated code per platform.

no need to write different code for different manufactures.

as an open supporter of technology,
i can see RTC (real time calling) think skype
real time gaming think "streaming gaming"
add hoc networks think "instant networking"
VM desktops think cloud "home computing"

there is any number of transports designed off the back of this technology that could become regular use


xploder



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 09:09 PM
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Originally posted by spacedoubt
reply to post by XPLodER
 



Ok buddy, that was NOT non-techie.


but it was an awesome description nontheless.


ill try again,

its like sending a little java script program to your web browsers memory,
this program allows you to send and receive information in a format that is "compact".

when you want to watch a video a java script program is "sent" to your browser,
it handles decompressing and decoding of the picture in one step at the browser.

a server "compresses" the video into java script, and sends it to the little java script program in your browser where it is unpacked and recompiled into a video format.

this same process can be used to "transport" data for games, rendering (drawing) and compute ect.

think end to end transport, with your end supplied to you every time you connect to a new service


much faster rate of innovation when updates are not required at your end to implement changes to code.

because this is all done at a software level, you dont have to redesign the hardware encoders/decoders that pack/unpack the data and therefore no extra hardware is required.

xploder



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 09:34 PM
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OTOY founder and CEO Jules Urbach noted that they had found a way to provide a full PC experience through use of HTML5 and JavaScript without having to touch H.264, Flash, Java, or Google Native Client. He said, "We expect HTML5 to replace legacy operating systems on desktops, TVs, consoles and mobile devices."

Read more at: phys.org...


phys.org...

it looks like new transport algorithms will be the path to a new free web....

any computer with a screen can now be a powerhouse with web based power from the backend



xploder



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 09:43 PM
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I'm starting to wonder in looking at everything this company is producing in the last 3 years, and I'm thinking this might be kind of like the next Microsoft or something like that. Any chance that this is being publicly traded yet? I searched, and came up with nothing. If it isn't public and it does go public, this will be a big part of the next tech boom.



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 09:49 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 


Are they saying they have found a way to convert oop into binary on the fly? Or did they actually port almost all syntax to java? If the former... Wow. That's... I can't even.

edit: Nevermind, I read the OP too fast. I wasn't sure of what WebGL was so I assumed they had made a miracle. lol

Even still... good job, and good luck to the webgl team. It is such a good idea, that it seems like someone should have came out with it a long time ago - But it is a bit questionable to do this to others' work, syntax, codec. Just saying.

For those who do not understand computers well... What they're doing is putting the computing workload onto servers and then using _javascript/webgl to render images and audio in a users web browser.

oh and to further clarify, this will not do away with actionscript programming (flash programming) and the alike, it will only do away with the rendering of actionscript, and the alike, through their rendering plugins(flash plugins, silverlight plugins, etc and so forth - the things that render for us).
edit on 5/6/2013 by Bleeeeep because: (no reason given)



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 10:23 PM
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Originally posted by InFriNiTee
I'm starting to wonder in looking at everything this company is producing in the last 3 years, and I'm thinking this might be kind of like the next Microsoft or something like that. Any chance that this is being publicly traded yet? I searched, and came up with nothing. If it isn't public and it does go public, this will be a big part of the next tech boom.


i think mozilla might have beaten you to it,
it sounds like they are now working together.

it looks like there are a couple of companies that are on the same path


the company with the fastest transport will ultimately have the most efficient codec,
it will be interesting to see who can provide the most compact transport,
and the most efficient use of a transport codec,

there can be a transport delivery and encoding scheme that is mutually defined,
this will allow for much less "overhead" in the codec

xploder



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 10:28 PM
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Originally posted by Bleeeeep
reply to post by XPLodER
 


Are they saying they have found a way to convert oop into binary on the fly? Or did they actually port almost all syntax to java? If the former... Wow. That's... I can't even.

edit: Nevermind, I read the OP too fast. I wasn't sure of what WebGL was so I assumed they had made a miracle. lol

Even still... good job, and good luck to the webgl team. It is such a good idea, that it seems like someone should have came out with it a long time ago - But it is a bit questionable to do this to others' work, syntax, codec. Just saying.

For those who do not understand computers well... What they're doing is putting the computing workload onto servers and then using _javascript/webgl to render images and audio in a users web browser.

oh and to further clarify, this will not do away with actionscript programming (flash programming) and the alike, it will only do away with the rendering of actionscript, and the alike, through their rendering plugins.
edit on 5/6/2013 by Bleeeeep because: (no reason given)


the only point to note is the java script implementation running in the browser does the transport and decode, on the client end.

so nearly any screen with a browser could be used


thank you for you explanation star

xploder



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 10:39 PM
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Originally posted by XPLodER


i think mozilla might have beaten you to it,
it sounds like they are now working together.

it looks like there are a couple of companies that are on the same path


the company with the fastest transport will ultimately have the most efficient codec,
it will be interesting to see who can provide the most compact transport,
and the most efficient use of a transport codec,

there can be a transport delivery and encoding scheme that is mutually defined,
this will allow for much less "overhead" in the codec

xploder



I always thought firefox was the best, but out of the box (download) this will make firefox a preferred browser among those who haven't tried it. It will open up a lot of new ways to use the web. 1080p that actually plays properly all the time? Video games live? Awesome. And so much more..thanks for sharing the thread.



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 10:43 PM
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reply to post by XPLodER
 


The decode and process of their newly created code, not of the original code. The original code would be decoded and processed by "the cloud" (servers).

They would basically be running the programs and sending you the audio/visual part after their servers had done all the heavy computing. If done well, people would be able to play/use high resource based programs with only a very basic computer. The downside is that you would have to always be online to do anything and online means anything you do is able to be seen.



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 10:49 PM
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reply to post by InFriNiTee
 



I always thought firefox was the best, but out of the box (download) this will make firefox a preferred browser among those who haven't tried it. It will open up a lot of new ways to use the web. 1080p that actually plays properly all the time? Video games live? Awesome. And so much more..thanks for sharing the thread.


firefox is actually at the front of the browsers who will be using this new tech,
firefox does shading in the browser, something the others have yet to catch up to,

it wont be long till firefox is the goto for browser functionality with html5,
they are already in the lead IMHO

xploder



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 10:54 PM
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Originally posted by Bleeeeep
reply to post by XPLodER
 


The decode and process of their newly created code, not of the original code. The original code would be decoded and processed by "the cloud" (servers).


yes and with the new "gaming cards" for servers from intel and others coming online, we will have plenty of power to render massive online games.



They would basically be running the programs and sending you the audio/visual part after their servers had done all the heavy computing. If done well, people would be able to play/use high resource based programs with only a very basic computer. The downside is that you would have to always be online to do anything and online means anything you do is able to be seen.


yes and without application specific traffic, the end user would just be a screen to render content onto,
always online is a problem, but if you can access the web you can access backend server power to provide more power than your own pc can muster in an instant and at a moments notice.

xploder


i imagine a home cloud, were you can "dial up" resources for specific games tasks ect.

xploder



posted on May, 6 2013 @ 11:48 PM
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Originally posted by InFriNiTee

Originally posted by XPLodER


i think mozilla might have beaten you to it,
it sounds like they are now working together.

it looks like there are a couple of companies that are on the same path


the company with the fastest transport will ultimately have the most efficient codec,
it will be interesting to see who can provide the most compact transport,
and the most efficient use of a transport codec,

there can be a transport delivery and encoding scheme that is mutually defined,
this will allow for much less "overhead" in the codec

xploder



I always thought firefox was the best, but out of the box (download) this will make firefox a preferred browser among those who haven't tried it. It will open up a lot of new ways to use the web. 1080p that actually plays properly all the time? Video games live? Awesome. And so much more..thanks for sharing the thread.


Firefox hangs and is unusable on every machine I've tried it on. That's 4 workstations running windows xp to windows 7 64 bit, and one running ubuntu 12.04 and a laptop running windows 7.

You tube or any site with flash is instant hang. So if firefox can actually replace flash with something that works I will be very happy. However note that google is working directly with adobe now for future versions of flash for chrome.

blog.chromium.org...

I doubt that adobe is going to let flash die without a fight, as much as we hate how buggy it's become.





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