Help ATS with a contribution via PayPal:
learn more

Is your old t-shirt hurting African economies?

page: 2
4
<< 1   >>

log in

join

posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 11:05 AM
link   
We have donated and continue to donate to heifer international Linky

There are other similar charities that allow one to give goats, chickens and even cows to people that are impoverished.

I think that it's a wonderful cause.




posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 11:08 AM
link   
reply to post by grubblesnert
 


Yep!! My kids were brought up with thrift-store GOOD QUALITY clothing - they griped in middle school, but now they both get the idea and take advantage of it. My son (22) just moved into his first apartment - he and his girlfriend have a gorgeous chest of drawers of solid wood that someone put out at the curb - and a dresser that is a hand-me-down of solid quality wood as well. One of his roommates has all cheap Ikea crap and my son just rolls his eyes.

My daughter (24) LOVES to bargain hunt, and has learned finally how to budget for groceries, etc...

It takes a long time to teach kids how to do it - and so few parents bother! Go you!!
There's my brag.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 11:15 AM
link   
reply to post by Wildbob77
 


Exaclty....

Did you watch the vid? Perfect example of the same thinking, and it's an entertaining, educating visual and an excellent song.

Good for you!!
Good for them!
We all win!


I hate the stock-market profits-are-all mentality.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 11:15 AM
link   
This is something that was presented to me a while back when I read an article about this with Haiti and subsequently heard an interview on NPR with a woman from Africa (can't remember which country) who talked about how Western charity, whether through goods or food, is keeping local economies from developing organically (in the sense of on their own).

The woman's point was that local markets get flooded with cheap processed products, so local farmers can't make a decent amount for fresh, local produce. Clothes, also being dirt cheap through donation channels, lead to negative effects on local tailors and textile producers, right down to the materials.

To give you an idea of a possible life cycle of these clothes, let's consider an experience I had over 10 years ago. I was riding the subway in Madrid, Spain and a West African immigrant was wearing a worn out University of Arizona T-shirt. Considering school apparel was probably made in China or Malaysia or Bangladesh, that shirt made is rounds!

I get that some here consider the plus side of "recycling", but let's not forget the three-pronged approach that recycling comes out of:

1. Reduce
2. Reuse
3. Recycle

Arguably, Reuse and recycle have come to mean the same thing in this case. Tthe first step is "reduce"; we need to stop creating such a demand for this cheap crap, and stop wasting it. Then, the guilt of throwing it out gets obviated. Repurpose, that should be on that list too...ripped t-shirts become rags.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 11:19 AM
link   
reply to post by Sphota
 


Reuse and recycle have come to mean the same thing in this case. The first step is "reduce"; we need to stop creating such a demand for this cheap crap, and stop wasting it. Then, the guilt of throwing it out gets obviated. Repurpose, that should be on that list too...ripped t-shirts become rags.

It's the most common sense thing in the world.


I do LOTS of repurposing as well. I call my efforts "Make-Do Enterprises" and have been told repeatedly how much 'personality' my home exudes.....it just takes some thought and creativity. Hmmmm...what do I have on hand, and how do I get it to function in a way I need?

*shouts in bullhorn at Western wasters, but not at the people on this thread* "It's not hard, people!!!"

edit on 12-4-2013 by wildtimes because: (no reason given)



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 11:27 AM
link   

Originally posted by wildtimes
reply to post by Sphota
 


Reuse and recycle have come to mean the same thing in this case. The first step is "reduce"; we need to stop creating such a demand for this cheap crap, and stop wasting it. Then, the guilt of throwing it out gets obviated. Repurpose, that should be on that list too...ripped t-shirts become rags.

It's the most common sense thing in the world.


I do LOTS of repurposing as well. I call my efforts "Make-Do Enterprises" and have been told repeatedly how much 'personality' my home exudes.....it just takes some thought and creativity. Hmmmm...what do I have on hand, and how do I get it to function in a way I need?

*shouts in bullhorn at Western wasters, but not at the people on this thread* "It's not hard, people!!!"
edit on 12-4-2013 by wildtimes because: (no reason given)


I'm staying with my grandmother...this is how her generation learned to live (pré-baby boomer). Thrift. She's the one who taught me how to compost. It's a good skill, thrift I mean. It's not incredibly compatible with modern consumption, but if you can break the habit, I find it makes you have more character and individuality. Like you said, your house has that and I could probably imagine it.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 11:37 AM
link   
reply to post by Sphota
 

Yep....
it's how I was brought up, too. I'm one of the Last of the Baby Boomers (sometimes called Generation Jones)....
and it's a lifestyle that works.

In fact, my husband and I are currently building a veg plot in our front yard, bordering it with used cedar rails that were given to me by the "fence guys" who were replacing a utility fence last summer.



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:50 PM
link   
If it's been already mentioned, forgive me.

1.) Exporting cheap clothes to Africa requires that Africa wants to import them. They make the choice based on their understanding of the economic situation, national pride, etc. While others might, I don't want to go to an African government and tell them what their economic policies should be. Are they "second-class citizens?" Are we in a position to make their decisions for them?

2.) Assume that importing cheap clothing sharply curtails their textile industry. That sounds bad. Now assume that importing cheap clothing allows them to put capital and manpower into other economically sound industries. That sounds good.

As an example, cheap imports might free their assets to build roads, electrical grids, or the fish farms that another poster mentioned.

I'm only suggesting that we broaden our view, consider more consequences.
edit on 12-4-2013 by charles1952 because: spelling



posted on Apr, 12 2013 @ 01:55 PM
link   
reply to post by charles1952
 


Thanks for your input. It's a slippery system....
your points make sense. However, I think more 'globally' than just locally, I guess. I see the big picture and too many people struggling, starving, and treated like slaves and, yeah, 'second-class citizens' of the Planet. There's enough to go around. Really, there is.

Greed gets in the way.



posted on Apr, 16 2013 @ 08:33 AM
link   
reply to post by wildtimes
 
I think that if there weren't second hand stores full of donated clothes from the US for Africans to buy at a cheap price that some other country would fill the gap. Even here in the US many people cannot afford to buy brand new clothes but still want to dress nice.

When my kids were young I bought most of their clothes at resale shops, thrift stores, garage sales, flea markets and outlet stores. When they are young they outgrow clothes long before they have a chance to wear them out so there's no sense in spending a lot of money when you can get gently used fashions for a fraction of the cost. I still look for deals and recently bought a washer and dryer that are only 6 months old and still under warranty at a savings of over $600. I bought my refrigerator used for $100 and it's still going strong over 10 years later!

Buying used or second hand goods creates a job market where there had formerly been none and gives people a chance at entrepreneurship. The money they earn generally gets circulated back into their own communities. It is a win/win situation no matter what country it is.



posted on Apr, 16 2013 @ 08:48 AM
link   
reply to post by littled16
 


Are you reading my mind again?? *reaches for tinfoil hat*

I agree with you and that is exactly how I raised my kids, as well.
Thanks for posting.



posted on Apr, 16 2013 @ 09:03 AM
link   
i see nothing wrong with sending used cloths to Africa. the argument used is actually rather baseless. we are not hindering anything by doing it at all. those who most of the clothes would go to wouldn't be able to afford NEW clothes even if they were manufactured there.

but hey if you think it is an issue feel free to send clothes to other third world nations, like the Philippines for example who HAVE textile industries yet many people NEED clothes, as like i said above they can't AFFORD the new ones produced.

even better instead of "selling" the used clothes you could give them to charities and groups that hand them out to people in need. you would not believe the gratitude of people when you give them just one set of used clothes in decent shape, even used shoes are greatly appreciated. and don't forget even hot countries may have people that can use cold weather stuff, here it is the people who live in the mountain areas, in deserts it can apparently get quite cold at night even with extreme heat during the day.



posted on Apr, 16 2013 @ 09:07 AM
link   
reply to post by generik
 

Not sure if you're speaking to me here or not.
I'll review the thread, but I don't agree with the OP, and as I recall it has been established that most members posting feel the same way I do about it -

Thanks for posting though. I think the premise made by the guy who says it's bad is wrong and is pushing continued waste and consumerism.





new topics

top topics



 
4
<< 1   >>

log in

join