Did you know the NFL is tax exempt?

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posted on Mar, 6 2013 @ 09:39 PM
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I put this here because well, it's crazy.

That's right, the NFL is tax exempt. Even though they made $193 million dollars in 2012 the NFL did not pay any taxes, and the owners who paid on average of $6 million in dues paid no taxes on the donation to a non profit organization.

This is old news really, they have been tax exempt since the 60's. I was surprised to learn this though, and I think many other people would be as well.

Here are a few quotes from the articles below that stand out:

Playing by the NFL's Tax Exempt Rules


“I’ve been here 40 years. I finally get to the point where I’m making 150 grand, and they want to put my name and address on the form so the lawyer next door who makes a million dollars can laugh at me…A hundred and fifty thousand here is not the same as it is in Dubuque, Iowa or West Texas.”


I think that's pretty funny actually.



The NFL is a tax exempt organization with annual revenues of $6.9 billion. The American public has a right to know what kind of compensation the executives of nearly $7 billion in sales earn under the protection of the tax exemption afforded them by the Internal Revenue Service.



Most of the public would be shocked to learn that the NFL money-making machine is tax exempt.


I was.


If the top guy in this tax exempt entity pulls down $10 million or so in salary, and who knows what perks the NFL covers in addition, one might suspect that the 25 or so other highly paid executives aren’t hovering at $150,000. Many probably make very hefty salaries themselves. Of course, one might suspect that a nonprofit whose exec makes $10 million is a little light in its “nonprofitness”.



Nonprofits as complicated as the National Football League require more disclosure, not less, particularly when they are so much more like for-profit business juggernauts operating behind the nonprofit cloak.



the NFL is able to use its nonprofit trade association status to pay for some big-time lobbying. In 2007, the NFL spent $1,125,000 in federal lobbying, up from $380,000 the previous year.


The NFL Is Still Technically A Non-Profit Organization


It may seem absurd that a collection of teams that generated at least $9 billion in revenue last season would be given tax-exempt status, but the NFL is technically classified as a 501(c)6 organization.

Read more: articles.businessinsider.com...



The NFL-AFL merger language was included at the end of the bill that had nothing else to do with football.



A business league is an association of persons having some common business interest, the purpose of which is to promote such common interest and not to engage in a regular business of a kind ordinarily carried on for profit.



How are their efforts to maximize profits any different than those of Major League Baseball, the National Basketball Association or the National Hockey League?



The important thing here is that WE THE PEOPLE granted the NFL this tax exemption, even if it was decades ago.


Yet ticket prices are still outrageous.




posted on Mar, 6 2013 @ 10:46 PM
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This is the modern day Roman Coliseum designed to entertain the masses while the elite play their power games behind the scenes.

Why would they pay taxes when they own the games?


Peace



posted on Mar, 6 2013 @ 10:54 PM
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Well, they need money to play the big salaries of the players.

This happens in almost every country, my girlfriends dad was an executive for a baseball club in Korea, and it was the same thing.



posted on Mar, 6 2013 @ 10:56 PM
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they play on sundays, right?

they must be a religion.



posted on Mar, 6 2013 @ 11:01 PM
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Originally posted by hououinkyouma
Well, they need money to play the big salaries of the players.

This happens in almost every country, my girlfriends dad was an executive for a baseball club in Korea, and it was the same thing.


Yup...and as long as bigger stadiums are built, the fan base will continue to pay top dollar for seats.

I am a Dallas Cowboys fan but I refuse to step foot in Cowboys stadium and pay $60 for an F ing pizza.

I think Jerry Jones is a sick headed man.

edit on 6-3-2013 by solarstorm because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 6 2013 @ 11:14 PM
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reply to post by solarstorm
 





I am a Dallas Cowboys fan but I refuse to step foot in Cowboys stadium and pay $60 for an F ing pizza.


You need to see the soccer teams in Brazil, most of them play in crappy stadiums and you pay $250 to see the most important games (and the population in Brazil is much poorer than in the US)



posted on Mar, 6 2013 @ 11:53 PM
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Originally posted by solarstorm

Originally posted by hououinkyouma
Well, they need money to play the big salaries of the players.

This happens in almost every country, my girlfriends dad was an executive for a baseball club in Korea, and it was the same thing.


Yup...and as long as bigger stadiums are built, the fan base will continue to pay top dollar for seats.

I am a Dallas Cowboys fan but I refuse to step foot in Cowboys stadium and pay $60 for an F ing pizza.

I think Jerry Jones is a sick headed man.

edit on 6-3-2013 by solarstorm because: (no reason given)


Sixty dollar pizzas! Good lord! I am a Steelers fan and I payed the 250 dollars per seats (two tickets) to watch them play this past season in Jerry world. Since I live in West Texas I don't get many opportunities to see The Steelers play. It was my first time actually. I definitely didn't buy any pizzas while I was there though! The popcorn was ten bucks a pop, and that is quite enough.


But yeah, the NFL is a giant corporation. It doesn't surprise me the least in this day and age that they pay no taxes. I, on the other hand, nearly broke the bank just to see my favorite team play once. Just once. And sadly, it was worth it to me.



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 12:32 AM
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reply to post by solarstorm
 


Woah 60 dollars for a pizza!? I'm from Pittsburgh, obviously a big steeler fan, and the prices are pretty high, compared to baseball and hockey games, but 60 dollars a pizza!? How much is a beer??


I regularly attend hockey games ( we have a thing called student rush where at certain hockey games students in the Pittsburgh area get 25 dollar tickets consisting of best available. We get hats, pizza, meet players and other things while we wait in line for 4+ hours) and we always get a towel or a shirt, blanket, a hat or something. But football?? Forget about it.

I'm shocked the NFL is non profit, they always talk about the NFL being a "business" on the ever dreaded and biased ESPN. I can't wait to call the radio station tomorrow and spread the word, I'm just baffled...they make soo much money...

*note
Is hockey and baseball non profit like football? How about the MLA? I'm curious if its just an NFL thing or a sport thing
edit on 7-3-2013 by AudioGhost because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 12:37 AM
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reply to post by AudioGhost
 


Seriously, Read the Protocols of the Elders of Zion, and understand why sports teams pay no taxes --

DON"T use WIKIPEDIA.

Really - you will be amazed - and then look into the history of the jesuits - NOT ON WIKIPEDIA.



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 12:40 AM
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reply to post by hououinkyouma
 


As big as futbal is in brazil, and how beautiful Brasilia is, you would imagine your country would have some awesome stadiums.

I feel you on the 250 a ticket on big games, the steelers have a lifetime waiting list for season tickets and peanut heaven is easily over 100dollars even for the crappiest games.

Wow what we humans pay to be entertained live to see a bunch of grown men play with balls



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 12:44 AM
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reply to post by Happy1
 


Any good source into what would be good to read since your advising not to read it on wiki? I'd hate to read a biased translation.



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 12:47 AM
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I could care less if they are tax exempt.

It doesn't impact me one bit.

What would impact me would be not seeing any football games.



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 12:49 AM
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Not for profit...Doesn't exactly mean tax exempt.

It means that the corporation shows no taxable income. That means their expenses match or exceed their income. It certainly doesn't mean that the people employed by the corporation don't have hefty salaries. That's part of the expense side of the equation.
edit on 3/7/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 12:52 AM
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reply to post by AudioGhost
 


Look around the internet - I would never just believe one source - there are many different sources.

Try to stay away from obvious conspiracy websites - try to do a bit more historical reading.



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 12:53 AM
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Originally posted by Phage
Not for profit...Doesn't exactly mean tax exempt.

It means that the corporation shows no taxable income. That means their expenses match or exceed their income. It certainly doesn't mean that the people employed by the corporation don't have hefty salaries. That's part of the expense side of the equation.
edit on 3/7/2013 by Phage because: (no reason given)


No one called you here....go back to the science and space exploration forums.



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 12:56 AM
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reply to post by solarstorm
 



No one called you here....go back to the science and space exploration forums.


There's really nothing good going on over there right now or I'd be all over it



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 02:38 AM
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As big as futbal is in brazil, and how beautiful Brasilia is, you would imagine your country would have some awesome stadiums.

I feel you on the 250 a ticket on big games, the steelers have a lifetime waiting list for season tickets and peanut heaven is easily over 100dollars even for the crappiest games.

Wow what we humans pay to be entertained live to see a bunch of grown men play with balls

reply to post by AudioGhost
 


Yeah, my family had a good financial background, but I can`t understand how some guys that make
$500 a month managed to pay the tickets.

Lucky that I`m living in Japan and Korea right now, and I can watch Baseball for a cheaper price.

BTW, I prefer Football than Soccer lol
edit on 7-3-2013 by hououinkyouma because: (no reason given)
edit on 7-3-2013 by hououinkyouma because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 08:11 AM
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reply to post by Phage
 


While non profit may not mean tax exempt, the NFL is tax exempt.

There may be people employed by the NFL who pay taxes, but the NFL its self does not.



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 10:08 AM
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reply to post by AudioGhost
 


It is only the NFL.

The links give more information about it all.



posted on Mar, 7 2013 @ 10:11 AM
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reply to post by ThaLoccster
 




There may be people employed by the NFL who pay taxes, but the NFL its self does not.

Yes. I know. That was my point.





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