I want to be a CHEMTRAIL DEBUNKER

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posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:40 PM
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reply to post by fireyaguns
 


They were slightly behind and beside each other it looks like from their trails. But even if they were side by side, horizontal clearance isn't as big a deal as vertical clearance, or trailing clearance. I've seen normal airliners flying side by side (I used the flightradar app to check), chasing each other, flying slightly diverging courses, and crossing behind each other. I've seen just about every type of contrail you can see out here since I've been back on the road.
edit on 3/11/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)




posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:41 PM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


What would be the time frame for a 757 to travel one and a half miles leaving behind such a strong turbulence?



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:42 PM
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reply to post by fireyaguns
 

The math is pretty simple on that.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by Phage
 


thanks for you expert comment.

It would be nice to hear from someone that has worked in the industry though.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:46 PM
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reply to post by fireyaguns
 


If they are less than 1,000 feet below, they are required to maintain a 5-6 mile trail if flying directly behind the aircraft. If they are only passing behind them, they can be closer, but it's not recommended. In 1993-1994 something like 15 people were killed in crashes caused by wake turbulence from a 757, and a Boeing 737 was put into a roll by wake turbulence off one. The 757 has the most intense wake turbulence measured off a plane. It takes about 2 minutes for the turbulence to completely dissipate, which is the required time between landings if a 757 is involved. But again, if you're going perpendicular to the 757, you are through the turbulence much faster, so you're only required to keep a couple mile trail, although they'll try to keep you at the 5-6 mile distance if they can.
edit on 3/11/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:57 PM
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Originally posted by fireyaguns
reply to post by Phage
 


thanks for you expert comment.

It would be nice to hear from someone that has worked in the industry though.



you already have, and if you wanted to do some research you could find more - eg www.skybrary.aero...



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 09:59 PM
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Not as close as you might think....









Originally posted by Zaphod58
reply to post by fireyaguns
 


If they are less than 1,000 feet below, they are required to maintain a 5-6 mile trail if flying directly behind the aircraft. If they are only passing behind them, they can be closer, but it's not recommended. In 1993-1994 something like 15 people were killed in crashes caused by wake turbulence from a 757, and a Boeing 737 was put into a roll by wake turbulence off one. The 757 has the most intense wake turbulence measured off a plane. It takes about 2 minutes for the turbulence to completely dissipate, which is the required time between landings if a 757 is involved. But again, if you're going perpendicular to the 757, you are through the turbulence much faster, so you're only required to keep a couple mile trail, although they'll try to keep you at the 5-6 mile distance if they can.
edit on 3/11/2013 by Zaphod58 because: (no reason given)



For you experts and professionals here,
What do you say the distance between the planes flying before the cross over?
How far apart are the turbulences from one another at the cross over point?



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 10:09 PM
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Originally posted by fireyaguns
For you experts and professionals here,
What do you say the distance between the planes flying before the cross over?
How far apart are the turbulences from one another at the cross over point?


Closer than miles, further than feet.

more than that would require more information than a single still photo provides.



posted on Mar, 11 2013 @ 10:39 PM
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reply to post by fireyaguns
 


The plane crossing behind wouldn't experience turbulence from the plane in front. He's above the turbulence layer, which is why he went up and over. Wake turbulence tends to drop as it comes off the back of the wing. By going up, he crossed over it, and at worst got a couple of small bumps. But he's probably a mile or so in trail, and was at least that far back, and a half mile or so horizontal separation. But without more pictures or a video it's hard to say for sure.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 02:19 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


Thanks



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 05:48 AM
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reply to post by Zaphod58
 


I will ask you because you seem to know more than the Gual. waynos, phage and tsufer2000

These two planes are not realy doing the right thing are they?



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 05:59 AM
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reply to post by fireyaguns
 


Those planes aren't commercial jets.

They're fighter jets.

F15's to be exact...


“What you can clearly see in the photograph is the wingman crossing the leader’s flight path to obtain a WEZ [Weapon Engagement Zone]-in-depth position to be ready to use the missiles as soon as the leader achieves the VID [Visual IDentification]” explains Lt.Col. Salvatore “Cheero” Ferrara, an Italian Air Force pilot assigned to the JSF program at Washington DC, formerly flying as an interceptor pilot with both the F-104 and the F-16.


LINK



These two planes are not realy doing the right thing are they?


It would appear that they're doing exactly the right thing.

edit on 12/3/13 by Chadwickus because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:14 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


Wow great picture. Those two planes in the far back ground, would they be higher or lower?

The trail behind the two far planes appear to evaporate bhind them.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 06:38 AM
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reply to post by fireyaguns
 


Read the link I supplied.

If you have any questions, ask Lt.Col. Salvatore Ferrara.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 07:27 AM
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reply to post by Chadwickus
 


I read the link,I didn't see any reason for the odd difference between the trails.

Your great
edit on 12-3-2013 by WhosAuthority because: (no reason given)



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 07:47 AM
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Originally posted by fireyaguns
reply to post by Chadwickus
 


Wow great picture. Those two planes in the far back ground, would they be higher or lower?

The trail behind the two far planes appear to evaporate bhind them.



How far away are they, is their contrail a similar length to the jets in the foreground, is the altitude,humidity and temperature the same at their location compared to the jets in the foreground.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 08:19 AM
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reply to post by WhosAuthority
 


What odd difference?

Why does a cloud fill one part of the sky, but not another?

Is that odd to you too?



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 10:02 AM
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reply to post by fireyaguns
 


Yes, actually they are. I just recognized the picture. They are F-15Cs out of Elmendorf Air Force Base. The two contrails heading towards them are Russian MiG-29s. Alert aircraft pretty much do what they want when they launch, as they have priority over everything but an inflight emergency.


Here is an explanation as to what they're doing.
defensetech.org...

Short version, the wingman is the one crossing behind the lead. He's setting himself up to drop in behind the MiGs to take a shot if necessary, while the flight lead gets a visual identification of them. This picture was taken from one of two F-15s that were following along as backup. This was taken in 1989.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 10:05 AM
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reply to post by fireyaguns
 


The MiG-29s appear to be slightly above the F-15s, but you can't tell because the F-15 taking the picture is slightly higher than the intercepting aircraft. If he was coaltitude you could tell. I would say that the F-15s are trying to be slightly higher though, as the higher aircraft has an advantage over the lower.

As for the MiG contrails, I've seen that before, where one aircraft flying "beside" another leaves a long persistent contrail, while the other one is leaving a little short contrail that dissipates quickly. A very slight change in atmosphere conditions means the difference between the F-15 contrails, and the MiG contrails.



posted on Mar, 12 2013 @ 02:10 PM
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So when USAF F-15s intercept Russian MiGs, do they spray chemtrails whilst doing so? Guess that's the question we need answering now!





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