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Amazing New Technology Will Make Batteries Obsolete

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posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 08:27 AM
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reply to post by grey580
 


For some people that dont really realize what Graphene is for this world... this is a gamechanger folks. We're talking about a technological leap here. Not just for batteries,, this stuff can also be harder than steel or even diamonds. We can use it to make stuff, like making entire phones or buildings or planes out of it. The biggest obstacle is finding a way to produce it on a mass scale that is also very very cheap! The double bonded carbon molecule that is basically what Graphene is, is a very very strong construct. Basically stronger than anything we've ever produced as a society. This stuff is very very exciting if you read up on it. The possibilities are almost endless. Just think as we grow we can even get into triple and quadruple bonded carbon atoms maybe..??? There is also a crop circle I saw online that gave the atomic structure of graphene supposedly, I am not up on atomic structures of molecules so i dont know if it actually is or not, but thats what they say!
Anyways, I talked about this stuff last summer to some guys at work and it is a very promising venture!!
The electrical properties of this stuff is awesome. No heat build up, no loss of signal, almost instantaneous current flow from one point to another. Man this is exciting stuff people!!
edit on 27-2-2013 by weknowall because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 08:45 AM
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Will looks like Big Brother removed this video Hmmmmm!



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 08:47 AM
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reply to post by weknowall
 


O K.
Just a thought, but how would it work to wrap lithium and graphene in a roll like a capacitor?
Of course, there would be a medium between them, just like a cap.
My question being, what would be any worthiness of doing such a thing?
Would there be any gains realized by such an effort?



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 08:51 AM
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Being able to charge something fast is not a trait of any technology that would replace batteries. Being able to hold a charge for an extended period of time and in an affordable and more compact design, is. No matter how super your capacitor is, it's not going to replace batteries.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 09:03 AM
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reply to post by MCL1150
 





Will looks like Big Brother removed this video Hmmmmm!


Interesting disclosure, remember how we got CD technology in the first place..
Originally laser disk tech was military patent, one of those things that should have been invented in the 40's but didn't seem to make it into the mainstream till after elementary school kids were writing FIFO algorithms for buffers..



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 09:14 AM
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reply to post by smithjustinb
 



Being able to charge something fast is not a trait of any technology that would replace batteries. Being able to hold a charge for an extended period of time and in an affordable and more compact design, is. No matter how super your capacitor is, it's not going to replace batteries.

Many capacitors can hold their charge for weeks or months... but I haven't really read much about how well these graphene super caps work in that regard. Traditional super caps are bulky and complicated but these graphene caps can be extremely compact and simple in design, not to mention extremely cheap and easy to make. Assuming these graphene super caps can hold their charge for long enough they could easily replace the battery, and I hope they do... the time it takes to charge things these days is so last century. It's time for a technological break through of this magnitude imo.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 10:24 AM
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It this works it means they can fly drones non-stop without refueling.
They probably had figured this out already anyways.
I hope the people get some use out of this and it doesn't just turn DOA like the electric car.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 10:51 AM
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This is awesome. I really believe that 3D printing is going to change our lives. If you could print a graphene battery at home as well as the parts, you could be printing your next ipod at home. That is crazy. I was just reading about a guy who is 3D printing a car, they are hoping to drive from San Francisco to New York on something like 10 gallons of gas.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 11:39 AM
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I found the video again on Vimeo.

vimeo.com...

With a story here.
www.kcet.org...

And an update here.

The new micro-supercapacitors are also highly bendable and twistable, making them potentially useful as energy-storage devices in flexible electronics like roll-up displays and TVs, e-paper, and even wearable electronics. The researchers showed the utility of their new laser-scribed graphene micro-supercapacitor in an all-solid form, which would enable any new device incorporating them to be more easily shaped and flexible. The micro-supercapacitors can also be fabricated directly on a chip using the same technique, making them highly useful for integration into micro-electromechanical systems (MEMS) or complementary metal-oxide-semiconductors (CMOS). As they can be directly integrated on-chip, these micro-supercapacitors may help to better extract energy from solar, mechanical and thermal sources and thus make more efficient self-powered systems. They could also be fabricated on the backside of solar cells in both portable devices and rooftop installations to store power generated during the day for use after sundown, helping to provide electricity around the clock when connection to the grid is not possible.



edit on 27-2-2013 by grey580 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 11:53 AM
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Here's a nice article that goes into some of the benefits of the GSC.

www.extremetech.com...


Now, beyond the novel manufacturing process — the scientists are confident it can be scaled for commercial applications, incidentally — the main thing about LSG capacitors is that they have very desirable energy and power characteristics. Power-wise, LSG supercapacitors are capable of discharging at 20 watts per cm3, some 20 times higher than standard activated carbon capacitors, and three orders of magnitude higher than lithium-ion batteries. Energy-wise, we’re talking about 1.36 milliwatt-hours per cm3, about twice the density of activated carbon, and comparable to a high-power lithium-ion battery.



Flexible graphene capacitorThese characteristics stem from the fact that graphene is the most conductive material known to man — the LSG produced by the scientists showed a conductivity of 1738 siemens per meter (yes, that’s a real unit), compared to just 100 siemens for activated carbon. The performance of capacitors is almost entirely reliant on the surface area of the electrodes, so it’s massively helpful that one gram of LSG has a surface area of 1520 square meters (a third of an acre). As previously mentioned, LSG capacitors are highly flexible, too, with no effect on its performance (pictured right).


I'm floored. And the dang thing is flexible to boot.
Amazing.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 11:55 AM
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Originally posted by Cauliflower
reply to post by MCL1150
 





Will looks like Big Brother removed this video Hmmmmm!


Interesting disclosure, remember how we got CD technology in the first place..
Originally laser disk tech was military patent, one of those things that should have been invented in the 40's but didn't seem to make it into the mainstream till after elementary school kids were writing FIFO algorithms for buffers..



This will be dug up in 1500 years, the explorers will date it back to; government 1948



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 12:03 PM
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Another article.

physicsworld.com...


Researchers in the US have made a graphene-based supercapacitor that can store as much energy per unit mass as nickel metal hydride batteries – but unlike batteries, it can be charged or discharged in just minutes or even seconds. The new device has a specific energy density of 85.6 Wh/kg at room temperature and 136 Wh/kg at 80 °C. These are the highest ever values for "electric double layer" supercapacitors based on carbon nanomaterials.


What exactly does that energy density mean in english?



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 12:11 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 



What exactly does that energy density mean in english?

I would assume it means the amount of energy which can be stored in a certain volume/space. When you read about typical super caps you will read that they are inefficient as batteries because they have low energy density, meaning they can't hold much energy without being huge in size. But these graphene caps are comparable to lithium-ion batteries apparently, which is pretty amazing. So I would presume that a graphene super cap battery would be about the same size as a lithium-ion battery of the same storage capacity. The advantage of the graphene super cap is obviously the speed at which it can be recharged and the durability as well as environmental benefits.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 12:16 PM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 





Of course it's a big deal.


It'll also make that huge pile of Lithium worth hundreds of billions they found in Afghanistan worth a lot less too.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 12:34 PM
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Truly interesting! Let's hope we get to see this technology in everyday use. As for the large corporations suppressing it I am not too worried. There are many companies that could benefit from this in their products. I'm more worried that patents will protect and make the benefit for us normal folks expensive .



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 01:02 PM
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reply to post by tkwasny
 


I agree, I used to work For Uncle Ed, ( Edison ), at peak times even peaker units which have 4 or more Jet engines
have to go from a dead stop to 3,600 rpm in just under 3 min for their share of the grid !



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 01:15 PM
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Here is the Press Release

newsroom.ucla.edu...


“Our study demonstrates that our new graphene-based supercapacitors store as much charge as conventional batteries, but can be charged and discharged a hundred to a thousand times faster,” said Richard B. Kaner, professor of chemistry & materials science and engineering.

“Here, we present a strategy for the production of high-performance graphene-based ECs through a simple all solid-state approach that avoids the restacking of graphene sheets,” said Maher F. El-Kady, the lead author of the study and a graduate student in Kaner's lab.

“We attribute the high performance and durability to the high mechanical flexibility of the electrodes along with the interpenetrating network structure between the LSG electrodes and the gelled electrolyte,” explains Kaner. “The electrolyte solidifies during the device assembly and acts like glue that holds the device components together.”

edit on 27-2-2013 by grey580 because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 01:35 PM
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Nahh, if we even tried to replace gasoline cars the oil industry would be down our throats. They would pay that technology out before the fat lady sings.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 02:08 PM
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Big oil can't suppress innovation forever.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 03:10 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 


Great find, correct me if I'm wrong but isn't graphene also a very strong material if bound correctly. I remember reading an article somewhere stating that graphene is more consistent than carbon fiber when it comes to resilience and flexibility. I had a quick squiz on wiki, seem this stuff has properties for a vast number of uses. en.wikipedia.org...

Hopefully we will be seeing this being incorporated into many aspects of the technological world.

Good things






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