Amazing New Technology Will Make Batteries Obsolete

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posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 06:28 AM
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Sorry for the caps but that's the way the video is titled.

So again we see some very cool uses for graphene.
Basically these guys figured out a economic way of making graphene.
They coated a blue ray dvd with a liquid that they then cook with a blue ray laser.
Producing a flexible sheet of graphene. Which they then turn into a supercapacitor.

This does have some big implications. They claim that the charge time is from a few seconds for a small capacitor to a few minutes for large capacitors. If they can actually get this to work rechargeable cars might actually be replacing gasoline powered cars.


This revolutionary breakthrough technology will change the world as we know it. It is known as Graphene. These graphene supercapacitors work similar to batteries, except they can charge a hundred to a thousand times faster.


Unfortunately we've seen too many technologies that haven't panned out. But this one does seem promising. Cheap and easy to make with off the shelf technologies. Definitely something to keep an eye on.

edit on 26-2-2013 by grey580 because: (no reason given)
edit on 2/26/2013 by semperfortis because: Correct ALL CAPS




posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 06:30 AM
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The instant current draw will be very high. You'll need 000 gauge cables.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 06:44 AM
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I hate to give the military any ideas, but there may be a lot of applications for this in weapons systems.

Maybe in fast repeat fire capacitors for railguns?



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 06:48 AM
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Originally posted by tkwasny
The instant current draw will be very high. You'll need 000 gauge cables.


Feasible. You should just change to a higher voltage, by the way


Okay, I don't want to start a thread with "110V vs. 230V", as this is useless and a de-railing of the OPs posting.
Edit: Oh, and its of course DC, not AC - so no problemo with 110V here.

This graphene is a wonderful stuff!


Instead, we used a consumer-grade LightScribe DVD burner to produce graphene micro-supercapacitors over large areas at a fraction of the cost of traditional devices. Using this technique, we have been able to produce more than 100 micro-supercapacitors on a single disc in less than 30 minutes, using inexpensive materials."
edit on 26-2-2013 by ManFromEurope because: (no reason given)

Wonderful stuff, neatly produced!
edit on 26-2-2013 by ManFromEurope because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 07:01 AM
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reply to post by grey580
 


Interesting that it is a General Electric video.

I guess it has potential so they're backing it, as opposed to everything else that has little practical application and fails to meet the pre-requisites to become so, and which become lost in history only be be assumed the power bogey man has come to steal the ideas.

Which I'm not saying hasn't happened. it's documented that power companies have set artificial limits to common things so there is a need for more of them, to increase profit and not do themselves out of a business.

I wonder what we will see from this. It does look promising.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 07:44 AM
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I made a battery a year ago that can recharge itself just from static electricity but i dont hold charge for long so i ditched it. I left it switched on back then and the LEDs are still on today.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 08:20 AM
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What software could be used to activate the burner to oxidize the carbon on the discs? It could always be collected and stored, and who knows-maybe this could go open source? Please ATS find all the applicable info on putting together an experimental DIY project (open source, so that no patents etc. are violated). I think a person could open source this under the GNU License!



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 08:28 AM
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reply to post by InFriNiTee
 


Open Source Battery Project?
I like the sound of that. I wonder if that's feasible ala a maker bot type of deal.
Would be cool to try.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 08:33 AM
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S+F! I would like this to be totally open source though, no kickstarter or anything like that. I'm sure there's a distro of Linux out there that has a force-burn app (that forces it to burn on the "disc" no matter the "observed" condition of it? Let's get the wheels turning...



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 08:39 AM
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Here's an article that goes into some detail about the technique.

www.printedelectronicsworld.com...


"To label discs using LightScribe, the surface of the disc is coated with a reactive dye that changes color on exposure to the laser light. Instead of printing on this specialized coating, our approach is to coat the disc with a film of graphite oxide, which then can be directly printed on," Kaner said. "We previously found an unusual photo-thermal effect in which graphite oxide absorbs the laser light and is converted into graphene in a similar fashion to the commercial LightScribe process. With the precision of the laser, the drive renders the computer-designed pattern onto the graphite oxide film to produce the desired graphene circuits."

"The process is straightforward, cost-effective and can be done at home," El-Kady said. "One only needs a DVD burner and graphite oxide dispersion in water, which is commercially available at a moderate cost."



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 08:40 AM
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reply to post by grey580
 


Thank you for posting that, I will be taking a look at the link!



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 08:50 AM
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"The process is straightforward, cost-effective and can be done at home," El-Kady said. "One only needs a DVD burner and graphite oxide dispersion in water, which is commercially available at a moderate cost."


That part is what stands out the most, this "graphite oxide suspension in water". For this project, that would be the first step.

The other thing is it sounds like they are using Lightscribe software to etch the circuit patterns on the graphite oxide layer.

Specifically it says:


Then, they simply inserted the coated disc into a commercially available LightScribe optical drive — traditionally used to label DVDs — and took advantage of the drive's own laser to create the interdigitated pattern. The laser scribing is so precise that none of the "interwoven fingers" touch each other, which would short-circuit the supercapacitor.


None of the interwoven fingers touch each other. Sounds like dual-layer to me? Please share opinions.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 09:01 AM
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At the very least I might get some of this "graphite oxide suspension in water" and try a few experiments. I just wonder how they connect the circuits to a load? I'm thinking if a person tinkered enough, they just might be able to figure out how to make solar panels that are around 10-15 times as efficient as the "good" ones of today. They will probably be MUCH cheaper to produce as well...Hopefully.

edit on 2/26/2013 by InFriNiTee because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 09:13 AM
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Here's Kaners wiki page
en.wikipedia.org...

And here's his email where we can reach him.

www1.cnsi.ucla.edu...



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 01:45 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 


A lot of times these technologies don't "pan out", not because they're not practical and useful, but specifically because they ARE practical and useful AND a threat to oil profits. The labs get shut down, the researchers commit "suicide" and the new invention disappears.

When are people going to learn that oil is the BEST way to store and use energy.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 01:51 PM
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Amazing Thanks for that!
Learning about Graphene and Aerogel could keep me occupied
indefinitely .
I know this isn't the forum for this, but if the USAF has a giant triangle
it flys around, I bet it's made of Graphene and Aerogel.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 02:03 PM
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Originally posted by Urantia1111
reply to post by grey580
 


A lot of times these technologies don't "pan out", not because they're not practical and useful, but specifically because they ARE practical and useful AND a threat to oil profits. The labs get shut down, the researchers commit "suicide" and the new invention disappears.

When are people going to learn that oil is the BEST way to store and use energy.


What does oil have to do with electric batteries. The electric cars are already there, what do they expect to do? Convert oil to electricity with equipment in electric cars? That's not even feasible enough to be considered.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 02:28 PM
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posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 02:31 PM
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reply to post by InFriNiTee
 


None of the interwoven fingers touch each other. Sounds like dual-layer to me? Please share opinions.

They are constructing a form of substrate, finely divided traces with "cells" to trap stored charge that all combined add up to more storage capacity (capacitor) than existing thin film, oil filled or wound types. The multiple layers in reduced space savings would probably be these discs "stacked" on top of each other in a similar shape as caps exist today.

In my mind the problem is not storage capacity or charge time, it is the "discharge rate" that presents problems were it to simulate batteries in some regard.

Did all that make sense?



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 02:34 PM
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What I am wondering is, will this tech increase the productivity of a solar panel. Fast charge also means efficient transferring of energy, right?

Either way, this is pretty exciting tech...no more tangled wires and endless charging ipads and the like everywhere. Hopefully though this will advance collection in some way



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