Amazing New Technology Will Make Batteries Obsolete

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posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 09:01 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 


Cool cheese! Don't have time to read all that or get into it to see how and if it really works. But hey, everybody has plenty of old Blue Rays or CDs hanging around they could go test out how and if this works at home if they were so inclined.




posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 09:06 PM
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Originally posted by Wildbob77
I was reading an article about 10 years ago. It discussed one of the biggest fears of the oil producing countries.

That is of course a super efficient battery. This technology could give way to practical electric vehicles. That would crush the price of oil and relegate the oil producing countries to economic insignificance.

I hope this is perused to a useable product.

I would not say it would crash the oil prices, oil is used to made pretty much anything including plastic, and a bunch of other things in fact likely 70% of household items or items people use every day, and those CD's and the computer those dudes used to make there graphite battery including. So no it would not crash the oil market. However in some aspects of that market they would lose profits for sure if something like a fast charge supper efficient battery were to be invented and mass produced in everything from cellphones to cars.



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 09:09 PM
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reply to post by grey580
 


they just took the video down. hope someone got it.

i was going to link it to facebook and its gone 10:00 pm est
edit on 26-2-2013 by amtarcher because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 09:13 PM
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Originally posted by mr10k

Originally posted by Urantia1111
reply to post by grey580
 


A lot of times these technologies don't "pan out", not because they're not practical and useful, but specifically because they ARE practical and useful AND a threat to oil profits. The labs get shut down, the researchers commit "suicide" and the new invention disappears.

When are people going to learn that oil is the BEST way to store and use energy.


What does oil have to do with electric batteries. The electric cars are already there, what do they expect to do? Convert oil to electricity with equipment in electric cars? That's not even feasible enough to be considered.


Erm... Check this out...


The wheels of the car are always powered electrically. In extended-range mode, which activates whenever the battery has reached its minimum state of charge, power is seamlessly inverted to the electric drive unit from a generator driven by the 1.4-liter, 63 kW/86 hp gasoline engine
Linky

SO yes it is considered and found feasible enough to win prices.




posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 09:29 PM
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reply to post by amtarcher
 


It's not a big deal!!!

This was being done at UCLA and reported on March of last year!!!
SEE This. www.zdnet.com...



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 09:29 PM
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I need one of these battery's



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 09:48 PM
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And it's gone....did anyone download it?



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 10:09 PM
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Curious as to the stackabiliy of these things....



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 10:16 PM
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Originally posted by bigwig22
reply to post by David557
 


Unfortunately this is not a device that generates energy.

Its 'only' a device that is supposed to store it better than the tech we currently use.

But i looooooooveee that!


Umm..nuclear power?



posted on Feb, 26 2013 @ 10:47 PM
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Well I cannot find a single copy of this video on YouTube. Hopefully someone knows how to locate a copy. I would really like to see the video.

I was just using the wrong search terms. Here we go:


edit on 26/2/2013 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 12:06 AM
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Originally posted by Chippa
reply to post by amtarcher
 


It's not a big deal!!!

This was being done at UCLA and reported on March of last year!!!
SEE This. www.zdnet.com...

Of course it's a big deal. That article is probably when they were first making these breakthroughs. We've now had enough time for them to start mass manufacturing these types of batteries... and I'm still worried we wont see that day any time soon.

This doesn't really effect oil companies too much, since a lot of electricity is generated with oil anyway... but the battery companies, they should be having some serious concerns about this technology. There probably isn't many applications where old style batteries would work as well as these graphene batteries.

And I would not underestimate the power of battery companies when they are put in a situation like this. They control a huge sector of the energy industry because batteries are used in so many different places. Unless these battery companies could start making their own graphene batteries they are in trouble.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 01:01 AM
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One of the biggest challenges to producing electricity, efficiently, in ANY power plant, is the variable load it needs to contend with. It's expensive to produce less power at night, or at low peak hours, and then hard to make max power during peak hours. Power plants get around some of this load flux by the use of variable pricing, from night to day, redistribution of power on the grid, hydro electric storage/retrieval, and other semi-inefficient methods. You can't simply turn a dimmer switch up and down on a power plant, and keep it efficient at the same time.

Electric vehicles, or other storage units, can help stabilize demand by charging at low peak hours, as in night time. They give the power plants a place to dump power. But charging these vehicles makes a relatively inefficient storage system. A near lossless form of power storage would absolutely transform power production. Not sure if this is the real deal or not, but I hope to see it happen in my lifetime.

It's not about using less oil, it's about getting more out of it.
edit on 27-2-2013 by zayonara because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 01:14 AM
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Originally posted by grey580
If they can actually get this to work rechargeable cars might actually be replacing gasoline powered cars.

Over the fossil fuel companies' dead bodies...




posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:13 AM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


It isn't a battery. It is a capacitor. There is a huge difference.

Companies have been at work on creating new super-capacitors for a long time. These carbon based supercaps have been around for a long, long time already.

The whole goal has been to create a small (physical) size capacitor, with a huge storage capability. This thing you are seeing is already the size of a DVD, and it doesn't store as much energy as already available super caps on the market right now.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 06:35 AM
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O.K. seriously, after watching the video, I want to get some graphite oxide and make my own!



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 07:10 AM
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Originally posted by Chippa
reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 


It isn't a battery. It is a capacitor. There is a huge difference.

Companies have been at work on creating new super-capacitors for a long time. These carbon based supercaps have been around for a long, long time already.

The whole goal has been to create a small (physical) size capacitor, with a huge storage capability. This thing you are seeing is already the size of a DVD, and it doesn't store as much energy as already available super caps on the market right now.


Actually, this is a graphene based super-capacitor, which is both a battery and a capacitor, but using graphene which can be thought of as a super-capacitor on super-steroids.

And no, this isn't the 'size of a DVD'...they are printing *many" devices on *one* DVD...



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 07:43 AM
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Originally posted by Chippa
Whoa! Not so fast everyone. Graphene is Carbon. Carbon capacitors where the first super-capacitors out of the Box.

Back in the early 80's I was charging up 1 Farad Capacitors, and running LED's for around 15 minutes or maybe it was 20 minutes. So the dude lighting his LED in the OP post for what was it 10minutes?? - is far short of the little beggar I held in my hands, back in the 80's. And it was much smaller.

The problem with this disk, ( my guess), is that this crazy DVD coated with the graphene probably only produces a 1.2 volt cell. This is the key!!! You will have to put a lot of these layers together to get anything higher than a 1.2 volt capacity, when you do this you reduce the overall capacitance, then suddenly you have a really big stack of graphene coated DVD's to get any usable charge out of it.

Supercaps have been around since the 80's, but the problem is always the darn 1.2 volt cell. Even regular batteries run into this basic cell voltage limitation.

I am skeptical!!!


The benefits here are that this process can be done by anyone.

It's cheap, easy and fast.

The other benefits are that Graphene is 2D..meaning you could turn your entire house into a supercap if you wanted to by printing layers onto wallpaper and paparing your home with it.

You wouldn't need to have 'battery sized' energy storage devices any longer, now you can have house or office block sized devices instead.

Stacking 2000 A4 paper sheets turned into energy dense, 1.2V cells or supercaps is a LOT of storage, in the size of a typical car battery.

It also has better conductivity and lower resistivity at room temps than Silver, it is being considered as the perfect material with which to build quantum computers from too.

Optically it has many uses too.

It is also a self repairing material, using ordinary hydrocarbons, the molecules will bond with and fill any damaged areas on the 2D Graphene sheet.

This is exciting stuff.



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 07:51 AM
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Originally posted by tkwasny
The instant current draw will be very high. You'll need 000 gauge cables.


Doubt it.

Graphere has a very low resistivity, lower than pure Silver at room temperatures.

Less resistivity means less heat generated in the conductor.

edit on 27-2-2013 by MysterX because: spelling



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 07:51 AM
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reply to post by Chippa
 



It isn't a battery. It is a capacitor. There is a huge difference.

Companies have been at work on creating new super-capacitors for a long time. These carbon based supercaps have been around for a long, long time already.

The whole goal has been to create a small (physical) size capacitor, with a huge storage capability. This thing you are seeing is already the size of a DVD, and it doesn't store as much energy as already available super caps on the market right now.

What MysterX said. I am obviously aware that a battery is different to a capacitor, but the main concept behind super caps (as they explain in the video) is to get the best of both worlds. Super caps combine the quick charge time of the capacitor and the huge storage capacity of batteries. This graphene based super cap is even better than any other super cap we have in many ways. It's the super super cap.

Secondly, these graphene super caps have not been around for a long time, this research is still no more than 2 years old from what I can tell. And as MysterX mentioned it is not the size of a DVD, the graphene can be cut and shaped to fit the requirements of any situation. It's almost as if you haven't read or watched anything in this thread and you're just making stuff up...
edit on 27/2/2013 by ChaoticOrder because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 27 2013 @ 07:55 AM
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reply to post by ChaoticOrder
 





It's almost as if you haven't read or watched anything in this thread and you're just making stuff up...


Hmmm...strange, i was just thinking the same thing ChaoticOrder


Shill perhaps...or has his or her pension tied up in a battery company





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