R.I. power failures may last days, Thousands w/out power.

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posted on Feb, 9 2013 @ 09:04 AM
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R.I. power failures may last days, Thousands w/out power.


news.providencejo urnal.com

PROVIDENCE, R.I. -- Storm Nemo's ice, wind and snow knocked out power across swaths of Rhode Island, and a National Grid spokesman cautioned that this will be "a multi-day event. We expect there will be many people without power for several days."
(visit the link for the full news article)


Related News Links:
www.wpri.com
edit on 9-2-2013 by backcase because: (no reason given)




posted on Feb, 9 2013 @ 09:04 AM
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I live in Northern Rhode Island and the snow is up to about three and a half feet. No one is allowed to drive on the roads, nothing is plowed, and my animals are stuck in the house.

But, I am thankful to God that I have power and heat.

My sister who lives in providence with two kids is without electricity or heat and is freezing cold.

As for me, I'll be taking this snow day with a heavy dose of coffee and prayer.

I am asking the good member of ATS to pray for everyone in this state of emergency and do what they can to help out.

God bless you all

news.providencejo urnal.com
(visit the link for the full news article)



posted on Feb, 9 2013 @ 09:10 AM
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I never did understand why power cables weren't run in underground conduits in this day and age, is it some sort of technical limitation?

My mother has underground cables to her home in the UK, but the main lines are of course still over ground. I can't imagine that it's cheaper to build and maintain towers for cables than it is to dig a trench and run some plastic conduit, but I could be wrong, does anyone know?

Burying the cables would negate many of the issues caused by weather in a very simple way.

To everyone affected, hope you and your loved ones stay safe.



posted on Feb, 9 2013 @ 09:12 AM
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reply to post by backcase
 


Those effected by the prevailing weather conditions in Providence certainly will be in my prayers. I just hope that people are doing the sensible thing, and by that I mean wearing thier entire wardrobes, at risk of looking daft, rather than freezing thier bits and pieces off.

I am amazed that there seem to be no reports of government assistance in the area, bearing in mind how severe the weather is, and the fact that homes are without power for heating. If things were going to get this bad, there should have been, or should be an evacuation of the affected homes, at least for those who are old enough, or afflicted with an illness or disability which makes them particularly vulnerable to things like upper respiratory problems and blood circulation issues.



posted on Feb, 9 2013 @ 10:19 AM
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In Connecticut 3 feet plus ...all highways closed! Gonna be a couple of days to dig out.



posted on Feb, 9 2013 @ 10:45 AM
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I just found out that you will get a $500 fine in my town if you are driving a vehicle without a plow on it.

Police are asking people for their snow mobiles for police use.



posted on Feb, 9 2013 @ 01:44 PM
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I'm in Rhode Island but we were lucky and never lost power. I was amazed! Ton of snow out there!

For my fellow Rhode Islanders and anyone else who has lost power, you will be in my thoughts and prayers.

I wonder how our homeless people made out? Hope they got to shelters somewhere.



posted on Feb, 9 2013 @ 01:54 PM
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Two and a half hours with a snow blower to dig us out today.
As it is now, there haven't been a plow through our area. We didn't lose power but all of our family has, luckily two of them have generators, but my elderly in laws have no power, no heat, and no roads cleared yet. Hopefully they will get aid before they get any colder.
We measured at almost 30 inches of snow total.
Has anyone out there hear any thunder last night? It was reported on the news.



posted on Feb, 9 2013 @ 03:36 PM
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Originally posted by babybunnies
I never did understand why power cables weren't run in underground conduits in this day and age, is it some sort of technical limitation?


Not really a technical limitation, but very much a financial one.
It's much more expensive to build an underground reticulation system than overhead construction. Older areas here have overhead systems but underground is becoming the norm for new subdivisions (which consequently have higher land prices because the developer is up for the difference in cost between underground and overhead construction). IE someone has to pay and there's already grumbling about rising energy prices.

Living in an underground area doesn't necessarily spare you from blackouts in bad weather unless the entire system from the local zone substation (source of distribution HV feeders) is underground and even then, the EHV transmission into those subs is probably overhead anyway and exposed to weather events.





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