Physical Death. Let's Face It. Let's Discuss It.

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posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 01:31 AM
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reply to post by severdsoul
 



tomorrow is not guaranteed to anyone


We always die on a day, that means a 'tomorrow' came when we died. If you were about to die now, you died today, that is yesterdays tomorrow.




posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 01:33 AM
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reply to post by LesMisanthrope
 


When does the energy enter a human being? Is it being after a foetus arised for three weeks?



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 01:34 AM
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reply to post by dominicus
 


Afterlife.. Kingdom of the dead?



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:08 AM
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Originally posted by dominicus
reply to post by Bedlam
 

that would be soooo pointless.


Who says life has to have a point? So many things don't.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:09 AM
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Originally posted by Night Star
If you look at serious case studies of near death experiences, you will see that you are more than just a physical body. I have had one out of body experience and a pre-birth memory that I cannot dismiss or ignore.


How do you know you weren't just imagining it?

It's the same issue with most serious studies of NDEs. They generally don't prove much, at least from a science aspect.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:10 AM
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Originally posted by Angle
reply to post by severdsoul
 



tomorrow is not guaranteed to anyone


We always die on a day, that means a 'tomorrow' came when we died. If you were about to die now, you died today, that is yesterdays tomorrow.


Yes, but it's a tomorrow where you're rotting meat. A bit different from one where you're participating in some role other than fertilizer.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:12 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


Everything becomes food for something else.

Split Infinity



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:13 AM
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Originally posted by Angle
reply to post by LesMisanthrope
 


When does the energy enter a human being? Is it being after a foetus arised for three weeks?


The question you're asking doesn't really make a lot of sense in the way you're asking it. There is no particular "life energy", that's a new age trope.

The "energy" would be glucose that the zygote's turning into ATP through the Krebs cycle. But there's no special energy that "enters into a person", other than glucose, maybe triglycerides or ketone bodies, if you're down to that for a last ditch energy source. But primarily glucose for human cells.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:15 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


Thx bedlam. I wasn't linear with time I figure. Thx.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:16 AM
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Originally posted by SplitInfinity
reply to post by Bedlam
 


Everything becomes food for something else.

Split Infinity



My point, though, is that you can't call your post-life fertilizer period "a tomorrow", in the sense that the poster up the thread said - 'you can't count on tomorrow'.

Yes, I guess you can count on it coming, and one day, you'll make the fertilizer transition, then tomorrow you're bug food. But I'm sure it's not what the carpe diem poster meant.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:23 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 


Even concepts and ideas either become food for thought...or decay upon the compost pile.

Split Infinity



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:23 AM
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reply to post by Bedlam
 



I've been living tomorrow for three, even more, years until now. Can it be?



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 02:55 AM
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Originally posted by Angle
reply to post by Bedlam
 



I've been living tomorrow for three, even more, years until now. Can it be?


All the way up until you reach your post-life transition, then your elastic buffer will clear.

At that point, tomorrow's fertilizer time. Not that that's bad, but it sort of obviates the living part of that. Except as plants, bacteria, worms and whatnot, of course.

I imagine there's some sort of edict here about excessive grossness, so I won't relate experiences in detail. I think one of the odder things I did was go scouting for a distant associate's head once. He got blown up real good and, well, sometimes you lose bits. In the heat of things, they got most of him but later wanted the head part for the funeral, we had control of that area back so we all went head hunting, to misuse a phrase. That sort of thing gives one furiously to think, as Poirot might say. I'd like to say it's all peaceful and idyllic, but after you see enough of it, my conclusion is that you die dead, the end, tout est fini. Then about two days later, faster if it's real warm, you begin your new status in earnest.

I'd really like to think there's more. I just can't convince myself. One day, we all find out. But it's Chandrasekhar's other limit you have to deal with at that point.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 03:18 AM
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I suppose not having been linear with time is the cause of my psychosis. We're getting offtopic. Let's just say we wandered of to 'mental death' or something. I left time with Arnold Sch's words, I'll be back.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 03:36 AM
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I am so sorry for your loss. Death of a loved one sucks and am still grieving myself from losing a loved one.

Where did you hear that in eastern cultures they talk of death freely? I know a few migrants from asian countries and they say it is taboo to talk of death in their culture. I think that westerners talk about death quite often and are OK with the topic. In our culture it is not taboo.

I believe that the soul continues after death and I look forward to that new journey but would feel sorry for my family I leave behind. I am not looking forward to the possible pain of dying but I also believe that the soul leaves our bodies before we are proclaimed "dead". I am also a romantic and entertain the idea of reincarnation. If you do not believe in reincarnation then take the time to google "Brian Wiess"... that psychologist sold me on the idea.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 03:37 AM
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Originally posted by Bedlam
How do you know you weren't just imagining it?

It's the same issue with most serious studies of NDEs. They generally don't prove much, at least from a science aspect.

On the contrary, many come back with irrefutable proof.

Here are three examples of this happening:


Four year old met his mother’s miscarried child in Heaven

"Colton, still 4 years old, told his mother “you had a baby die in your tummy didn’t you”, which completely shocked them both because they had never told him about their miscarriage. They asked him how he knew and he said that he met his sister in Heaven and she told him what happened."

"when Colton Burpo was four years he was having surgery in the hospital for a burst appendix. While he was in surgery he apparently had some sort of out of body experience...

Link 1 //// Link 2


George Rodonaia was assassinated by the KGB and spent three days in a morgue freezer:


"Dr. Rodonaia was killed by the KGB, pronounced dead, taken to the morgue for three days and returned to life during his own autopsy. Dr. Rodonaia was a psychiatric researcher who worked for the KGB and later became a dissident. He was a scientist trained in historical materialism and did not believe in God."

"George Rodonaia underwent one of the most extended cases of a near-death experience ever recorded. Pronounced dead immediately after he was hit by a car in 1976, he was left for three days in the morgue. He did not "return to life" until a doctor began to make an incision in his abdomen as part of an autopsy procedure. Prior to his NDE he worked as a neuropathologist. He was also an avowed atheist. LINK


"I had to die to learn how to live. I died for 28 minutes, and it was during this death experience that I learned how to live. There is life after death and it is not a place where spirits float around bored being nice. It is a real place."

Death is like getting on a roller coaster (Video)
Related videos



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 08:00 AM
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I've had two significant losses since this general time period in 2009 - one a murder and the other a death that was just as unexpected, and both people were very close to me for long stretches of time (decades) even if I'd pulled back from both by the time they began their approach to the circumstances leading to their respective deaths. The first one - a murder - hit me extremely hard, and I still struggle with the specifics surrounding what happened. The killer is in prison for good, and yet there are still many unresolved questions surrounding the nature of the incident, since it involved schizophrenia and possible lapses in judgment by others that may have amounted to depraved indifference on their part. So, it's hard to know if the impact of this death is more about a perceived injustice than about the actual death itself.

The 2nd death involved a confluence of terrible life choices and one last bad choice that may have taken the combination of impacts on the body and pushed it all to what - in retrospect - could be seen as a fairly predictable end. That death wasn't as jarring, even though it was just as unexpected, and contains a similar degree of uncertainty concerning the exact details surrounding what happened and why.

I guess I've got a very casual attitude toward death, and this seemed to be true even when I was handed a 50/50 chance of dying on the table in Nov 2011, as they were prepping me for emergency spinal surgery, and I was handed a phone in the ER to call a next of kin to let them know what was happening. I honestly didn't have a fear about dying, and was pretty indifferent to the idea of it - although it could've been due to how much pain I was in at the time, and how much I wanted that pain to just go away at any cost.

I would imagine that this has to do with my own firm belief that I'll continue after death, and that death isn't an end of any sort (for me, anyway) even if it is a temporary separation between me and the people I care about that will remain here. The 1st death (described above) probably hit me so hard because of the terrible circumstances of the death, and how protective I've always felt toward the person who was murdered. It had to have been terrifying for her, and this part of it is what has continued to haunt me.

I think that I'm much more troubled by bad moments in life than about death.

edit on 2/6/2013 by NorEaster because: (no reason given)



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 08:25 AM
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It's only death, it's not as if it's the end of the world. I look forward to the nice long rest I will get someday. My luck I will be instantly reincarnated.



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 08:32 AM
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(1) 'To fear death, gentlemen, is no other than to think oneself wise when one is not, to think one knows what one does not know. No one knows whether death may not be the greatest of all blessings for a man, yet men fear it as if they knew that it is the greatest of evils. And surely it is the most blameworthy ignorance to believe that one knows what one does not know.' (p. 121)

from 'the apology of Socrates'

Makes sense IMHO



posted on Feb, 6 2013 @ 08:58 AM
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Originally posted by jiggerj

Originally posted by dominicus

I don't agree that we are inherently the same as a tree, fish, ostrich etc. Perhaps elements body wise, then yes. But I think we are more than just the body


DNA proves that we are related to ALL things on this planet, but we're the only species out of millions with a soul? Don't you find that a stretch?


Same here. Complex things like DNA puzzle me to no end. Even if this life is just an illusion created by minds, the existence of these complex things are mysteries.

These days, I try my best to not to get myself too attached to these mysteries (although I'm still highly curious)
For me, in my life, everything I own, including my body, are just things that I borrow from this planet. When I died, I will have to return them (either giving it to somebody or not).





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