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As a matter of opinion, what's the perfect gun to get as your first firearm?

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posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:28 PM
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Originally posted by 200Plus
reply to post by NavyDoc
 


I agree, but the OP said money was an issue. A month ago an AR platform would have been easy to find and cheap to purchase. Neither of those are true today.


Fair enough. Goot points on the versatility of a good .357 revolver as well. Load down to .38 for light/cheaper plinking ammo and can even use shot shells.




posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:31 PM
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reply to post by magilla
 


You are off-topic, but, okay.
This young lady asked a question, and obviously there are people who are members now who have advice for her.....some of them may be new, some of them may be long-timers - what is the POINT of trying to "dis" her for asking??

To force her to use "search" and read through tired, dead threads? What's wrong with it being a new "topic" in survival??



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:32 PM
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reply to post by XxNightAngelusxX
 


A semi-auto would be a good choice.

Unfortunately the chance of you getting one for anything you can afford has really declined.
In terms of Shotguns, if you look around you can get an older winchester model that is reliable. H&R produces a low cost 870 model (Which is apparently better made than many current 870s.) I got one 4 years ago for 220 dollars.

The 870 being a very popular choice in shotguns today.
See if you have a friend that's into guns, or a family member before you buy something. There are a lot of shady gun stores that will try to take advantage of someone who doesn't know much about firearms, and being a younger girl they'll no doubt think you're an easy target to overcharge for.

Some stores that you can try (if you have them around) are:
Fisherman's Marine
Cabella's

Both of these have the cheapest prices I've seen. If you live near a larger cabella's you can also find a huge collection of used guns.
edit on 15-1-2013 by Miraj because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:33 PM
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Originally posted by wildtimes
reply to post by magilla
 


You are off-topic, but, okay.
This young lady asked a question, and obviously there are people who are members now who have advice for her.....some of them may be new, some of them may be long-timers - what is the POINT of trying to "dis" her for asking??

To force her to use "search" and read through tired, dead threads? What's wrong with it being a new "topic" in survival??


In addition, current political/social climates may have made older suggestions impractible for her. An AR that sold for $800 a year ago is now going for $2500 +



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:40 PM
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reply to post by NavyDoc
 



Goot points on the versatility of a good .357 revolver as well.

See, the .357 that I shot had that awful recoil that almost knocked me down (we were shooting at a 100-yards-away dirt heap with clay pigeons just lying there.......)

I thought the .38 Special was easier to use.....
but, just my opinion. I'm a "small" female (5'4", 120 pounds) and it was very educational to be on a range with grown men who had lots of experience to coach me.


@OP; do you have any support-system people who have guns NOW that they would loan (and teach) you to use?
Find what is most comfortable for NOW, and work up from there....



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:42 PM
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Reply to post by XxNightAngelusxX
 


Well, you can read some useful advices here on Good First Handguns
By Chuck Hawks www.chuckhawks.com... and Buying Your First Handgun
by Dick Clark www.lewrockwell.com...




 
Posted Via ATS Mobile: m.abovetopsecret.com
 



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:42 PM
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Since you are looking primarily for a home defense rig I would suggest a pump action 12 gauge. 18 inch barrel w/extended magazine. Attach a flashlight to the mag. tube and you are ready to roll.

Lots of variety to choose from regarding what you would like to load it in it. From non lethal rounds, to lightweight birdshot, 00 Buck or slugs you have plenty of choices. Plus you can simply change the barrel and you have yourself a very viable hunting weapon that can take down anything from Pheasant to Deer. Plus they are relatively cheap!! and you can buy a wide variety of accessories to go with it.

Tough to beat!! My Remington 870 is always kept at the ready right next to my CZ P-01. Very versatile!!

.22's are fun for practice and plinking but you had better be prepared to put multiple shots quickly and accurately on your target if you plan to take it down with lethal force or at least enough force to immobilize the threat. A skilled pistol shooter is capable of that on a good day. The effects of adrenaline, dry mouth, panic breathing and tunnel vision are quite amazing in a stressful situation....



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:45 PM
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If I had one gun to choose from I would choose a 22 LR rifle. It is a great and cheap to shoot gun. It can kill both small game and deer. It is a quiet gun and can be a good defense weapon also. It may not have the knock down power of a big gun but it still can kill if it is shot accurately. A box of 50 good quality shells can be bought for under three bucks. Great starter gun till you get more accustomed to shooting.

A 12 gauge can give quite a kick for a smaller person, a smaller shotgun might be a better choice. A gun doesn't have to look impressive to work. Quality comes from design and machining. I'd suggest that the OP should ask her parents if they have an old 22 she could have. Maybe an uncle or aunt may have one laying around that they will give her or sell her cheap also.

A 22 LR pistol might be good also if you have the ability to buy one. Most states have rules for buying handguns. It is more expensive than a rifle in most cases to get a good quality pistol.
edit on 15-1-2013 by rickymouse because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:47 PM
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Originally posted by wildtimes
reply to post by NavyDoc
 



Goot points on the versatility of a good .357 revolver as well.

See, the .357 that I shot had that awful recoil that almost knocked me down (we were shooting at a 100-yards-away dirt heap with clay pigeons just lying there.......)

I thought the .38 Special was easier to use.....
but, just my opinion. I'm a "small" female (5'4", 120 pounds) and it was very educational to be on a range with grown men who had lots of experience to coach me.


@OP; do you have any support-system people who have guns NOW that they would loan (and teach) you to use?
Find what is most comfortable for NOW, and work up from there....


I have a general idea of how to use a Mossberg Maverick 12 gauge. I learned up on it a little bit. My dad has a pump action 12 gauge, so he can tell me whatever I don't know.

To everyone else--I'm still reading your replies over for the second time. I know it might sound childish or whatever, but I don't want to start with a 22, because it's known to be the "easiest." I don't want to start with the easiest, I want to start with the "norm." Of the gun world. If not, more. I learn better that way.

I know, that statement provokes the thoughts "Oh God, be careful doing that!" But of course I'll be careful. It's a gun, not a toy.



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by XxNightAngelusxX
 


I don't want to start with a 22, because it's known to be the "easiest." I don't want to start with the easiest, I want to start with the "norm." Of the gun world. If not, more. I learn better that way.

In that case, if it were me, I'd start with a 10-mil revolver,
and a .357 Magnum.




posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:50 PM
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reply to post by XxNightAngelusxX
 


The 22 is the norm starting gun in the real world. Before that there were bb guns and pellet guns when I grew up. To get good at shooting it takes many thousands of rounds.



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:52 PM
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Originally posted by XxNightAngelusxX

Originally posted by wildtimes
reply to post by NavyDoc
 



Goot points on the versatility of a good .357 revolver as well.

See, the .357 that I shot had that awful recoil that almost knocked me down (we were shooting at a 100-yards-away dirt heap with clay pigeons just lying there.......)

I thought the .38 Special was easier to use.....
but, just my opinion. I'm a "small" female (5'4", 120 pounds) and it was very educational to be on a range with grown men who had lots of experience to coach me.


@OP; do you have any support-system people who have guns NOW that they would loan (and teach) you to use?
Find what is most comfortable for NOW, and work up from there....


I have a general idea of how to use a Mossberg Maverick 12 gauge. I learned up on it a little bit. My dad has a pump action 12 gauge, so he can tell me whatever I don't know.

To everyone else--I'm still reading your replies over for the second time. I know it might sound childish or whatever, but I don't want to start with a 22, because it's known to be the "easiest." I don't want to start with the easiest, I want to start with the "norm." Of the gun world. If not, more. I learn better that way.

I know, that statement provokes the thoughts "Oh God, be careful doing that!" But of course I'll be careful. It's a gun, not a toy.


Well then just get the 12 gauge, it seems like you had your mind made up before you wrote the thread.
And a 22 is not the "easiest" gun, its just the most practical for a first time shooting. Compare the price of a box of 22 ammo to the price of anything else. Shooting gets expensive and if you are learning you don't want to be paying near a dollar a round just learn.
edit on 15-1-2013 by RandyBragg because: (no reason given)



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:52 PM
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The OP is only 19, so a shotgun is about her only viable option at this point.

OP~: If you want some specific models I can start posting links.

What I really reccomend is a shotgun, around 12 gauge. Walnut (Wooden) stock and grip. This will make the gun heavier but it will also aid in controlling it's recoil. Which is important with higher loads like buckshot, especially for a female. Walnut stocks also look much less terrifying to police or a jury in case you ever to have to defend the decision to shoot someone that is trying to hurt you.

Shotguns are also naturally cheaper since they don't require extra magazines. You can get decent ammunition for home defense for 10 dollars, and they are very easy to clean compared to a semi-auto handgun or rifle. You can also get shooting ammo for very cheap, since bird shot comes in large cases for low amounts of money.



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:53 PM
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Originally posted by wildtimes
reply to post by NavyDoc
 



Goot points on the versatility of a good .357 revolver as well.

See, the .357 that I shot had that awful recoil that almost knocked me down (we were shooting at a 100-yards-away dirt heap with clay pigeons just lying there.......)

I thought the .38 Special was easier to use.....
but, just my opinion. I'm a "small" female (5'4", 120 pounds) and it was very educational to be on a range with grown men who had lots of experience to coach me.


@OP; do you have any support-system people who have guns NOW that they would loan (and teach) you to use?
Find what is most comfortable for NOW, and work up from there....


Honestly, this is really the best answer in the thread: get out there and try a bunch! Find out what gives the best fit and feel. A smaller gun in the hands of some one comfortable with it will always be more effective than a larger gun in the hands of someone uncomforable with it. Just last week, I was apporached by someone with this very question. She was interested in handguns only so I took her out with 8 pistols of various makes and models and she ended up liking a Springfield Armory 1911 the best and now has one on order. She thought she wouldn't be able to handle a .45, but once she got a feel for it, she loved it.



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 01:58 PM
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Originally posted by wildtimes
reply to post by XxNightAngelusxX
 


I don't want to start with a 22, because it's known to be the "easiest." I don't want to start with the easiest, I want to start with the "norm." Of the gun world. If not, more. I learn better that way.

In that case, if it were me, I'd start with a 10-mil revolver,
and a .357 Magnum.



The first pistol I ever shot was my dad''s 6 inch Colt Python. Everything else seemed easy after that. I had nothing to compare it to at the time. Forced me to learn a proper grip technique very quickly.



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 02:03 PM
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reply to post by jibeho
 


Forced me to learn a proper grip technique very quickly.

And grip, and breathing are SO IMPORTANT!!!!



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 03:30 PM
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reply to post by XxNightAngelusxX
 


personally your first gun should always be a revolver.

*its easy to use the learning curve is usually a couple of minutes, and its design hasn't changed for a reason, why fix what isnt broken?

* its easy to maintain, theres no need for all those fancy gun cleaning kits and oils to maintain a revolver, a little lube and fiber wipe go a long way.

*its very powerful

* its very common so spare parts and ammo is plentiful

*it can be easily concealed unlike a .22 rifle

****and heres the most important reason in my opinion, and why i own 2 revolvers...you can leave it somewhere whether its buried in dirt or in your cabinet for many years, and you can just pick it up and shoot. there have been a lot of old western revolvers that have been found in the ground and still fire



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 04:19 PM
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Originally posted by XxNightAngelusxX
To everyone else--I'm still reading your replies over for the second time. I know it might sound childish or whatever, but I don't want to start with a 22, because it's known to be the "easiest." I don't want to start with the easiest, I want to start with the "norm." Of the gun world. If not, more. I learn better that way.

I know, that statement provokes the thoughts "Oh God, be careful doing that!" But of course I'll be careful. It's a gun, not a toy.


There is a very good reason why shooters normally don’t start with a “normal” gun.

It’s not for safety either. If you don’t gradually step into shooting, you can literally make yourself subconsciously scared of the weapon you are trying to use. With that fear of the weapons will come flinching and other bad attributes that will hinder you using that weapon.

If you start into shooting with a hard hitting gun, it is very easy to develop a flinch. That flinch comes from your subconscious being scared of the beating you will get when you pull that trigger. And once you get a flinch, it is hard to get rid of. If you do develop a flinch, then you will almost have to borrow a smaller rifle to do plenty of firing and work yourself out of that flinch.

So, I would recommend that if you do go with a larger firearm, you should still borrow a 22 rifle and get some range time to get yourself accustomed to shooting before you shock your system with a large recoiling shotgun, or pistol.

If you do go for a shotgun, or a high powered hand gun right off the bat, the try to shoot lower power loads first and work your self into the harder hitting loads.

That last thing you want in a self defense situation is to be as scared of the gun as you are the criminal attacking you.



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 04:40 PM
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You didn't say if you were looking for long gun or pistol.

I would def say no one can go wrong having a 22 LR in their collection. It is a fun gun and is great to learn with and cheap to shoot. I am a definite fan of bolt actions over lever actions and semi-auto's (for rifles)...but that is just me.

I don't know your shooting experience so a 12 gauge to start off with might be a little much. A 20 or 16 gauge might be a better primer to start with.

There is no legislation at this time (that I have heard of anyway) against semi-auto shotguns... so I wouldn't let that be a deterrent when the time comes. They may try to do away with rotary magazines...but good luck on that one...if ya got one..."Oops, that got damaged so I threw it away years ago"...

Start with a 22 LR and work your way toward where you want to go.



posted on Jan, 15 2013 @ 06:29 PM
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Some may laugh, but for a ladies starter shot gun, I use a 410. And getting a Marlin 22lr soon. For pistols I started with a a .380 but found the recoil a bit intimidating at first. So I got a SW Model 10 38 revolver. Now that's some accuracy, no wonder it was standard issue back in the day! I did range time with my mate, then took the CCDW and out shot the men in my class, who were shooting a 22 pistol of sorts. All over the place, but my shot pattern was about the size of a dessert plate! Having done that and qualified I had the confidence to go back to my .380 and am no longer spooked. The whoomph from the firing still thumps my chest, but I am no longer flinching as previous poster indicated. Practice and confidence will overcome this. I had my mate show me how to field dress his 45 and his 9mm, so if I had to maintain them without him, I could! 9mm is not hard to shoot, his has good sights, so scoping the target was easy enough. Still not wanting to shoot the 45 or his bigger guns, but I volunteer to clean them after range time, just to have handled them safely under learning supervision has been the biggest contribution to my success.
About the sights, when setting up aim, some sights are colorfully painted, larger, smaller, not painted. Some line up well to your arm and eye sight, some are off a little. Make sure when you find the firearm you like if the sights are adjustable that they are well maintained or sighted in properly. Do range time and see if yours behaves off a little up down side to side. Especially if the sights are not adjustable, this will improve your accuracy. Get a gun cleaning kit, and look up videos, some guns are easy to take apart others have trick and tips or can be down right frustrating to put back together, Which would make ownership of that particular one less convenient or enjoyable.
Hopes this gives you some insight from a woman's point of view....
SfS



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