What do you make of these synchronicities?

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posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 08:32 AM
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reply to post by MisterMarbles
 

This sounds suspiciously like fiction.




posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 09:03 AM
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I know my mundane Murse hypothesis is difficult to accept. It should be more credible when I tell you the objects contained within the Murses were: keys to the space ship, a miniature Antikythera device, a fine tuned set of crystals and plenty of coc aine.
edit on 22-11-2012 by MisterMarbles because: OCD



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 09:06 AM
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I made a thread a while back on this!!

I find this to be very interesting and i think there is more to it. What I"m not sure but i think it was some sort of tech possibly. Call me nuts whatever but it's all over. It's a commonality in many ancient statues and pics. Why is that?!?! It's got to be something!

I saw a documentary on Egypt a while back and it touched on this. I have no idea what the documentary was and I've been looking for over a year. I wish I knew because it showed statues lined in Egypt and they were carrying this item.




posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 09:09 AM
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Originally posted by mblahnikluver
I made a thread a while back on this!!

I find this to be very interesting and i think there is more to it. What I"m not sure but i think it was some sort of tech possibly. Call me nuts whatever but it's all over. It's a commonality in many ancient statues and pics. Why is that?!?! It's got to be something!

I saw a documentary on Egypt a while back and it touched on this. I have no idea what the documentary was and I've been looking for over a year. I wish I knew because it showed statues lined in Egypt and they were carrying this item.



Could you please direct me to the thread you made about this? I do recall seeing something here but I searched and couldn't find it. It may have been yours. Thank you!



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 09:34 AM
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reply to post by alumnathe
 


Found it!

Need Help Identifying This Item

I have always wondered what this was since so many civs have it in their hand or pics.



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 10:58 AM
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I see a:

-bag
-pail
-bucket
-"purse"
-pot

You see what you want to see. What may be a 'purse' in one photo might very well be a bucket in another.



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 11:00 AM
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Lunch?



posted on Nov, 22 2012 @ 03:11 PM
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The use of the 'bag' usually denotes that the person holds 'office'. Or I suppose the responsibilities that he 'carries' in an official, or symbolic capacity...depending where it is being used. So, if it is a 'god' or deity, it is a device to show that they have specific responsibilities or duties. It is much more associated with functionaries and civil service though on tombs and stellae depicting events in court or the court calendar.

The Romans used it much more explicitly...as an indicator of status.

en.wikipedia.org...:Roman_Tomb.jpg

www.historyofyork.org.uk...

The bag is used as a device, as visual shorthand, to indicate that they had an official or functional role, and then that role is denoted by the other items that they are holding. As in the case of the second example, Lucius Ducchius Rufinus held the office of Standard Bearer distinguishing him from other, more ordinary, centurions.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 10:27 PM
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Originally posted by Klassified
I believe these "purses" are in actuality, buckets which hold the water(or blood) of life. The Sumerians had a specific name for them which escapes me at the moment.

You will find that only gods have these in their hand. No commoner is depicted with one.

Sumerian name: Banduddu.

While true that no commoner is depicted with one, the overwhelming majority of Sumerian reliefs showing the "bucket and cone" depict an Apkallu with them in hand. The Apkallu were not gods, but were sent by them. They represent the mythic origins of both the genies (Djinn) and Angels.

Sometimes a king is shown "anointing" the tree (or other object.) In those cases, the Apkallu usually stands behind him. That sort of image is thought to mean that the king has been entrusted with the knowledge of the Apkallu and is, in a way, claiming responsibility for the success of the harvest (or other success - such as in construction, where the symbolism was also used as a rite of purification for a new building.)

More on the bucket and cone:
Link to a genuine academic source

You may have to scroll down to page 46.

A bucket is a handy thing, even in the present day. I don't think it's a stretch to imagine that the utility of a bucket might lead to its depiction in the artwork of a multitude of cultures. The topic is rich with potential symbolism.

Harte



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 10:58 PM
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reply to post by Harte
 

You sir, are a gentleman and a scholar. I don't care what they say about you.


Thanks for the info, and the link. I will indeed be perusing it.



posted on Nov, 23 2012 @ 11:14 PM
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Originally posted by Klassified
reply to post by Harte
 

You sir, are a gentleman and a scholar. I don't care what they say about you.



Neither, actually, and less, according to the "they" that say it about me.

harte



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 06:02 AM
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Thank you all so much for new sources to check out. As far as it being a metaphorical status symbol, it doesn't seem practical to carry around a bag/bucket/purse when you have so much insignia already woven into your clothes and headdress to announce your position in society. I think they were meant to carry something tangible. What that is remains a mystery (at least until I check out all your great new sources!).

One more thing, why would this container also be seen in Mesoamerican reliefs, and recently in Göbekli Tepe (circa 10,000 BCE)?
edit on 24-11-2012 by alumnathe because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 06:23 AM
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reply to post by alumnathe
 


A suggestion for why the 'bag' has been found in Gobekli Tepi and Mesopotamia - it was a device. Whether it was electrical - biologic or some form of energy that we have yet to learn about.

I like your thinking that it is not an accessory - already loads of symbols for status and position with regard to clothing. Hurry up and find the answer and then teach us about what you find!!!

Much Peace...



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 06:56 AM
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reply to post by Harte
 


Were the djinn and angels mythic or real?



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 02:54 PM
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I love this thread! S&F! I have been noticing what you call the purse, what I call the lunch pail, for years.
its in mayan images, gobekli tepii, and countless others. I dont believe its "symbolic" of anything, I believe its an actual straightforward object, a gadget, a tool of some sort. Like a car key or battery, or toolbox, or briefcase. I think its universal, ancient knowledge, or technology. Im glad to see this being discussed further. I think its one of the most obvious and important clues to "tie it all together".



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 06:25 PM
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Originally posted by jjsirius
reply to post by Harte
 


Were the djinn and angels mythic or real?


I'm gonna go with mythic here.


Originally posted by gemdog
I love this thread! S&F! I have been noticing what you call the purse, what I call the lunch pail, for years.
its in mayan images, gobekli tepii, and countless others. I dont believe its "symbolic" of anything, I believe its an actual straightforward object, a gadget, a tool of some sort. Like a car key or battery, or toolbox, or briefcase.

Or,... possibly,... a bucket?

Harte
edit on 11/24/2012 by Harte because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 24 2012 @ 11:56 PM
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reply to post by gemdog
 


I am beginning to think the same but only because it keeps showing up as a physical congruity in so many cultures. I am also following linguistic ties between cultures and I hope these objects, among others, support the linguistic duplicities I find. Thank you for posting anything you find in this way!



posted on Nov, 25 2012 @ 12:03 AM
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reply to post by Harte
 


Yes! Maybe just a bucket, and buckets were common (after all, it is something that held water or food or anything necessary to survival). But why is it always in the hands of those who are also wearing insignia and costuming designating royalty or sacracity? Why do these people get to hold the buckets in cultures worldwide? And what do they mean to cultures going back 10,000 years, important enough to carve them on monoliths that they then buried on purpose so they wouldn't be found for a long long time.. until now? Is there a message here we're not getting because we're all about containers holding things of monetary/political value?



posted on Nov, 25 2012 @ 02:47 PM
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Modern equivalent is a doctor and his black bag.

Nevertheless, this is an intriguing thread. The most interesting aspect is similar depictions from cultures separated not only by distance but also separated by time.

Most of the pictures I've seen posted on these theads show exact shape and proportionally the same size. That is indeed interesting.

I would like to see a timeline of when the carvings were made. The differences in what is carved onto the "purses" may be linked to that.

Great thread



posted on Nov, 26 2012 @ 05:56 PM
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I challenge you to show me a South American statue of a woman with a purse that was made before Christ.

They are all murses.

edit on 11/26/2012 by MisterMarbles because: Ayahuasca kicked in






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