Aircraft Carriers in Space

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posted on Oct, 18 2012 @ 10:07 PM
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I wasn't sure where to put this but thought a few of the ATS readership might enjoy the article.

It is a brief speculative look at the engineering and design philosophy of what contemporary science fiction imagines in various portrayals of a "capital ship", nothing terribly deep or earthshaking but fun to ponder.

I believe the author is a bit pessimistic and unimaginative but he brings up some good points that are often overlooked in the portrayal of practical military operations in most popular fiction.


Naval analyst Chris Weuve talks to Foreign Policy about what Battlestar Galactica gets right about space warfare.
 


Last month, Small Wars Journal managing editor Robert Haddick asked whether new technology has rendered aircraft carriers obsolete.

Well, not everyone thinks so, especially in science-fiction, where "flat tops" still rule in TV shows like Battlestar Galactica. So FP's Michael Peck spoke with Chris Weuve, a naval analyst, former U.S. Naval War College research professor, and an ardent science-fiction fan about how naval warfare is portrayed in the literature and television of outer-space.




Aircraft Carriers in Space

edit on 18-10-2012 by Drunkenparrot because: (no reason given)




posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 11:15 AM
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Someday it might become a reality with the change in technology. Star Wars series is still my all time favorite movies. We have space stations but eventually with commercial space programs, who knows what could be staioned up there circling the globe every 90 minutes



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 06:57 PM
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First of all good on you for bringing this interview to our attention.

This is a terribly interesting concept that I have given some thought to. The concept of warfare in space in regard to the hardware and strategies necessary, not to mention logistical support is certainly something many Sci-fi authors haven't given much thought to. It wouldn't really be very entertaining if they had, to be honest.

The Naval model of warfare in space is certainly a natural pretense. But, in fact, the nature of space and the 360 degree area of operation simply doesn't fit the model.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 05:16 PM
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The Jack Campbell 'Lost Fleet' books actually do a pretty good job of trying for 'realistic' space combat.

Worth a look if your into speculative space weapons and tactics. He deals with some of the issues in the article in the books.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 05:20 PM
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reply to post by Drunkenparrot
 


Could go far to finally put to rest all of the at present anomalous objects seen in space. Personally I figure it is already far more advanced than what the public knows but then the population is dwindling one disaster at a time.

I do not know why the strategists think that the present group of humans could not handle the truth of our expanding space programs. I think of the educational opportunities that will open up for the youth of the future and it is stellar.



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 07:05 PM
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Originally posted by justwokeup
The Jack Campbell 'Lost Fleet' books actually do a pretty good job of trying for 'realistic' space combat.

Worth a look if your into speculative space weapons and tactics. He deals with some of the issues in the article in the books.

The wiki entry on the 'Lost Fleet' series sounds interesting. Thanks for the tip, I'll definitely check it out


I enjoyed Joe Haldeman's The Forever War as it took the effects of relativity into account as well as making an honest attempt to stay within the bounds of Newton's mechanics.

It's an old story in the vein of Starship Troopers (the novel, not the movie) and well worth a read for anyone unfamiliar with the book.

Here is a link to a free PDF version for anyone interested...The Forever War by Joe Haldeman.pdf download



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 07:47 PM
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Originally posted by antar
reply to post by Drunkenparrot
 


Could go far to finally put to rest all of the at present anomalous objects seen in space. Personally I figure it is already far more advanced than what the public knows but then the population is dwindling one disaster at a time.

I do not know why the strategists think that the present group of humans could not handle the truth of our expanding space programs. I think of the educational opportunities that will open up for the youth of the future and it is stellar.


I agree that there is more in space than the government acknowledges but I believe we are still a long way from having the technical capability or need for fielding the space equivalent of the IJN Yamato
(anybody remember that one?)


I believe there is plenty of mystery speculating about what the X-37B is up to...



Or why the NRO can afford to "donate" 2 KH-11 reconnaissance satellite's to NASA. The KH-11 is a serious observation platform, what do you suppose they have to replace it with?
U.S. Spy Satellite Agency Gives NASA 2 Space Telescopes

Then there are always the rumors and speculation about possible black program successors to the manned Boeing X-20 Dyna-Soar



Such as the Blackstar Spaceplane


I also agree that the opportunities for our youth in the future will indeed be 'stellar'.
edit on 2-11-2012 by Drunkenparrot because: (no reason given)



posted on Nov, 2 2012 @ 11:23 PM
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No one cares to mention WHITE BASE from the original gundam series?



posted on Nov, 4 2012 @ 12:45 AM
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reply to post by Drunkenparrot
 


What a great reply. I appreciate the efforts you took to make that post almost thread worthy.





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