Temples of Mount Hermon

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posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 08:11 PM
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What I find an interesting question. How did these structures remain standing for these centuries. Were they just too heavy to knock over?

Thanks for all those pictures. They make you think.What was the purpose of these structures in the lives of the population and what would they look like crowed with people?




posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 09:37 PM
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reply to post by Kantzveldt
 





Curiously it is very hard to get any information or recent photographs of the ruins on the summit, one taken in 1953 is the best i can come up with!


That is where the Fallen Ones first appeared in the first wave.
edit on 17-10-2012 by lonewolf19792000 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 09:39 PM
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Originally posted by The GUT
The evidence just continues to build for the historicity of The Watchers, no? Yes.

GREAT thread.


More proof the bible is historically accurate. Love archeaology. Proving the bible one site at a time
.



posted on Oct, 17 2012 @ 09:48 PM
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Interestingly enough, Mt. Hermon also happens to be where the nuclear reactor at Dimona is. 2 destructive influences appear in the same area. Chilling.



posted on Oct, 18 2012 @ 01:10 AM
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reply to post by lonewolf19792000
 


Er no the nuclear facility is in the Negev



posted on Oct, 18 2012 @ 04:27 AM
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well i could care less for the religious aspects, but great thread, love ancient societies/buildings/art/pottery ect ect bonus when they come with great pics ^^



posted on Oct, 18 2012 @ 05:37 AM
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reply to post by Artorius
 



Theres no indication as to how old the pre-Roman sites would be, there are hundreds of dolmen on the Golan heights dating back to at least the early bronze age, but really nobody knows.












reply to post by stupid girl
 



Apparantly it's in relation to the Paris Meridian, 35 would be Greenwich i guess.



The 133rd Psalm used in an Entered Apprentice's lodge reads as follows:

"Behold, how good and pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity! It is like the precious ointment upon the head, that ran down upon the beard, even Aaron's beard; that went down to the skirts of his garments; As the dew of Hermon, and as the dew that descended upon the mountains of Zion; for there the Lord Commanded the Blessing, even life for evermore."



Deuteronomy 4:48

KJV - ...even unto mount Sion, which is Hermon...




reply to post by The GUT
 



Indeed it does...and probably hidden in the most obvious place were nobody would ever look.



reply to post by okyouwin
 




What remains of those temples is probably down to the standards of Roman engineering, what intrigues me more is who would have ruined the older megalithic sites and strewn the stones around, as most cultures that settled in the region over time i would have expected to have valued the traditions of the area and sites.








edit on 18-10-2012 by Kantzveldt because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 18 2012 @ 08:57 AM
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Originally posted by Hanslune
reply to post by lonewolf19792000
 


Er no the nuclear facility is in the Negev


Aight you got me. I was using google chrome and i typed in Mt. Hermon and it showed me Dimona.



posted on Oct, 18 2012 @ 09:03 AM
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reply to post by Kantzveldt
 





What remains of those temples is probably down to the standards of Roman engineering, what intrigues me more is who would have ruined the older megalithic sites and strewn the stones around, as most cultures that settled in the region over time i would have expected to have valued the traditions of the area and sites.


When the Dark Ages came, alot of things considered sacred were torn down, their stones and blocks used for making other structures, homes, fortresses, barns and that sort of thing. During that period there were alot of things people stopped caring about in their mad scramble for power and survival. The collapse of civilizations often has this effect, although sometimes areas are preserved due to superstition of a fallen city or civilzation being cursed and peopel will flee that area and never return such as the case of Troy or Carthage.



posted on Oct, 18 2012 @ 09:29 AM
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Originally posted by lonewolf19792000


When the Dark Ages came, alot of things considered sacred were torn down, their stones and blocks used for making other structures, homes, fortresses, barns and that sort of thing. During that period there were alot of things people stopped caring about in their mad scramble for power and survival. The collapse of civilizations often has this effect, although sometimes areas are preserved due to superstition of a fallen city or civilzation being cursed and peopel will flee that area and never return such as the case of Troy or Carthage.


Just a note western civilization fragmented but the rest of the world kept right on going. Carthage was restarted by the Roman's nonetheless. Troy was rebuilt also five distinct layers of habitation occupied the site after the circa 1200 BC destruction by the alleged destruction by the Greeks. However I get your point. A truly abandoned city would be like Tikal, Amarna or Loulan



posted on Oct, 19 2012 @ 05:45 AM
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Here's another example from Ain Hircha that the Romans cobbled together, the ancient platform looks well preserved here;







Ain Harcha (or Ain Hircha) is a village situated in the Rashaya District and south of the Beqaa Governorate in Lebanon. It is located east of Mount Hermon close to the Syrian border south of Dahr El Ahmar

The village sits ca. 1,200 metres (3,900 ft) above sea level and the name is claimed in Aramaic to mean "house of spirits" or "place of worship" with some seeing this as derived from "the feast of sorceries" due to local folklore suggesting an evil spirit of Ain Al-Horsh inhabits the springs of Lebanon























2 kilometres (2,000 m) (about a forty minute walk) along a rocky path, on a ridge-top to the west, 525 metres (1,722 ft) higher than the village sits one of the best examples of a Roman temple in the vicinity of Mount Hermon.[3] The temple of Ain Harcha can also be reached by walking down from the village of Ain Ata.


It was restored in 1938-1939 and dates from a Greek inscription on one of the blocks to 114-115 AD. The temple is built of limestone, opens to the east and blends in well with the landscape. The pediment and west wall are in particularly good condition and two columns bases show what supported the beams and roof. Carved blocks show busts of Selene, the moon goddess and Helios, the sun god.[4] Around the site are remnants of ancient habitation and tombs




en.wikipedia.org...



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 10:12 PM
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I was listening to coast 2 coast am and the guy who was a speaking of nephilims said mount hermon is the polar opposite of roswell? is that true?



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 10:34 PM
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Originally posted by stupid girl

Originally posted by Kantzveldt
reply to post by Xcouncil=wisdom
 




It's kind of interesting the land place of the watchers is such an important observation post...




yes, especially since it is physically located at 33 degrees of both latitude and longitude......


and so is the 1947 crash site outside of Roswell New Mexico



posted on Oct, 25 2012 @ 10:37 PM
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Originally posted by vaelamin
I was listening to coast 2 coast am and the guy who was a speaking of nephilims said mount hermon is the polar opposite of roswell? is that true?


Yes, both are 33, 33
edit on 25-10-2012 by shasta9600 because: (no reason given)



posted on Oct, 26 2012 @ 06:17 AM
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This is whats suggested for Mount Hermon, based on the Paris Meridian.






posted on Oct, 26 2012 @ 11:25 AM
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reply to post by Kantzveldt
 


33° 24′ 58″ N, 35° 51′ 27″ E well no actually, so I don't think a 33 argument is going to run - how would the builders have known that 19th century Europeans would site '0' at Greenwich and also would used a non standard degree value based on a 360 degree circle but modified to 90 for north and south?



posted on Oct, 26 2012 @ 04:30 PM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 




Like i said this conjecture is based on the Paris Meridian...



posted on Oct, 26 2012 @ 05:18 PM
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reply to post by Kantzveldt
 


Howdy Kantsveldt

Paris is at 48°51′24″N 2°21′03″E

Greenwich is at 51°28′45″N 0°00′00″E

So the difference would be 2.21'.03"

Mt Hermon is at ° 24′ 58″ N, 35° 51′ 27″ E based on Greenwich

So if you minus that from the Greenwich position for Mt. Hermon you get

Mt. Herman measured by an imaginary Paris Meridian would be at 33.30' 04"

Now how close is that being a 'hit'? Why would this be of any importance based on what I noted above? I guess I shouldn't ask but the 33.33 longitude line runs all around the world why is this line running from the not used Paris position of any value? Why are all the other 33.33 position on the globe not equally "valued"?



posted on Oct, 27 2012 @ 05:30 AM
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reply to post by Hanslune
 



Yes you're right you really shouldn't ask, there's any amount of internet lore regarding other sites and occurances on the 33rd parallel, but it's probably best if we don't go there.


The focal pount for Mount Hermon though is suggested as Banias/Paneas at the foot of the Mount, which is interesting as it's lore is that of an entrance into the Underworld, the complementary aspect to the Mounts linkage to the Heavens



posted on Oct, 28 2012 @ 10:28 PM
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They do say if you cut a hole thru the Earth at Mt Hermon you will come out in Roswell, New Mexico. Probably just an oddity and no more rhan that.





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