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Pigs and squatters threaten Peru's Nazca lines

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posted on Aug, 15 2012 @ 05:13 PM
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If it's so difficult to live there it seems there must be another reason for their presence? Perhaps more to the story than we are able to gather from this one source.




posted on Aug, 15 2012 @ 06:18 PM
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Originally posted by captaintyinknots
This type of topagraphical manipulation *SHOULD* have been next to impossible back then.

Why do you say that?



posted on Aug, 15 2012 @ 07:09 PM
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reply to post by jeantherapy
 


There were a few sentences in the article that seemed to indicate there could be a political aspect to the issue. The squatters took up residence on the site during the Easter Holiday. The squatters are grown children from a nearby town that cannot afford to buy their own land or house. It also states that if a squatter occupies land for more than a day they have the right to judicial process to evict them, which can take 2 to 3 years.

These are my own thoughts on this in view of these statements. The squatters actions might be considered a protest regarding the economy and their ability to earn enough to afford to purchase land and a home. The article states that they "invaded" the site over the Easter Holiday, which logically might have made it easier to accumulate more than a day's time before being caught. What better way to get your governments attention regarding such an issue than to use the governments own laws to draw attention to their plight. If you read what the spokesperson from the squatter settlement had to say, his statement does appear somewhat confrontational regarding the subject.


The head of the squatter settlement, Jesus Arias, denies his community has hurt the area. "It isn't archeological to me. There was no cemetery there, and there are no lines from Nazca culture either."

Arias said the squatters are the grown children of people from the nearby town of San Pablo who want their own homes. "Our population keeps growing," he said. "These are poor people who don't have the money to buy land or a house."

Arias said the culture ministry should do a better job marking the boundaries of protected areas.


The Nazca site is a Unesco world heritage site, which means that the site has been determined to be of outstanding universal value to people of all cultures throughout our world, just as the pyramids in Egypt are and so forth. Any actions that might damage or destroy these sites will gain world wide attention. Unesco often will step in to assist these sites if they are in danger of destruction. The article states that the squatters destroyed a Nazca-era cemetery, which would be sufficient cause to gain international attention, and although the leader of the squatter settlement stated that there was no cemetery there, he also stated that the site isn't archeological to him, but the site is in fact a well known archeological site.



posted on Aug, 15 2012 @ 09:17 PM
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Originally posted by jeantherapy
reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


If there is so much land available for food production why are they having to use this space?


probably being used to grow coca
for the benefit of a few

also note that the individual claiming that there are no relics or lines
has a spanish name, not a native one
so its a case of this POS and his buddies going with the big lie for his own selfish benefit

sounds like the same mentality that justifies killing off entire tribes in the amazon
because the poor loggers are trying to make a living




please, educate yourself

The Destruction of Human History www.abovetopsecret.com...



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 10:16 AM
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Originally posted by hounddoghowlie
this qoute from their leader.

The head of the squatter settlement, Jesus Arias, denies his community has hurt the area. "It isn't archeological to me. There was no cemetery there, and there are no lines from Nazca culture either.
The story really never clarifies if that claim is true or not. If it's true, then the title of that story and this thread is false. It's unclear to me if the Nazca lines are actually threatened or not.

My main takeaway from this story is that Peru has a serious problem with their law. They give squatters rights of litigation after squatting for only one day? That's a ridiculously short time and I can't think of any sane reason why anybody would consider such a short time reasonable.

The other takeaway is perhaps Peru does need to mark the protected area more clearly as the OP story suggests:


Arias said the culture ministry should do a better job marking the boundaries of protected areas.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 11:08 AM
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Originally posted by Arbitrageur

Originally posted by hounddoghowlie
this qoute from their leader.

The head of the squatter settlement, Jesus Arias, denies his community has hurt the area. "It isn't archeological to me. There was no cemetery there, and there are no lines from Nazca culture either.
The story really never clarifies if that claim is true or not. If it's true, then the title of that story and this thread is false. It's unclear to me if the Nazca lines are actually threatened or not.

My main takeaway from this story is that Peru has a serious problem with their law. They give squatters rights of litigation after squatting for only one day? That's a ridiculously short time and I can't think of any sane reason why anybody would consider such a short time reasonable.

The other takeaway is perhaps Peru does need to mark the protected area more clearly as the OP story suggests:


Arias said the culture ministry should do a better job marking the boundaries of protected areas.


this is the second paragraph in the article.

The squatters have destroyed a Nazca-era cemetery and the 50 shacks they have built border Nazca figures, said Blanca Alva, a director at Peru's culture ministry.


this is attributed to "said Blanca Alva, a director at Peru's culture ministry."

this is her profile in linked in.
Blanca Alva Guerrero

now granted she has a different last name, and the reason could be many, but i think it safe to say that it's the same person. and that being a director of culture ministry. it's about offical as you can get.

and yes they might want to take a look a their squatters rights.
could you image a group of goat herders moving in the the great pyramids of giza, or a bunch of pagans setting up camp at stonehenge.
edit on 16-8-2012 by hounddoghowlie because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 11:21 AM
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reply to post by DerepentLEstranger
 


don't throw me in with advocating destroying the Amazon, please. the Nazca lines area is apparently barren, thus the world's clean breathing air supply is not being jeopardized by "squatters" aka poor people that realize that it's insane to have to pay money to live when many men are capable of building meager yet suitable housing if only they had a place to do it. Kinda sucks that basically all the land on Earth has already had "dibs" called on it.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 02:18 PM
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reply to post by hounddoghowlie
 


um concerning spanish surnames:
blanca is her given or xtian name
alva is paternal surname
guerrero is maternal surname

spanish speakers use both surnames
especially when many surnames are VERY common

the fitzgerald in john kennedys name is his mothers surname btw



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 02:36 PM
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Originally posted by jeantherapy
reply to post by DerepentLEstranger
 


don't throw me in with advocating destroying the Amazon, please. the Nazca lines area is apparently barren, thus the world's clean breathing air supply is not being jeopardized by "squatters" aka poor people that realize that it's insane to have to pay money to live when many men are capable of building meager yet suitable housing if only they had a place to do it. Kinda sucks that basically all the land on Earth has already had "dibs" called on it.


i did no such thing
i was refering to squatter leader claiming "it's not archaelogical, there are no lines there"
a self serving lie as has been shown

its nothing to do with you
as you yourself and others have pointed out
the land is barren and useless for agriculture or raising pigs

this is a real estate scheme, nothing to do with poor folk, though many in the group may be innoccent, IMHO, and based on experiance, some personal; it would seem that the leaders of this group seeks squatters rights in order to later sell to developers when the matter has been forgotten

a couple of years ago a real estate developer, here in PR, organized the building of a pair of condos, one was on protected land, he did this in such a manner that by the time the authorities found out

it was already finished, after a year in court, and probably some payoffs he got of with only a small fine.

my great grand father was a farmer and died a very sad man
why because the lands he and the previus 4 generations had worked so hard to buy and till
were wittled down to nothing by hordes of squatters.
this was in the late 40-early 50's

the squatters all received title to the land they stole
thanks to crooked politicians that bought their votes

thats what mr "it's not archaelogical" smells like

hope that cleared things up for you dude
edit on 16-8-2012 by DerepentLEstranger because: (no reason given)



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 03:08 PM
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Originally posted by DerepentLEstranger

sounds like the same mentality that justifies killing off entire tribes in the amazon
because the poor loggers are trying to make a living




You wrote that, not me.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 03:34 PM
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reply to post by jeantherapy
 


Look how long it took to figure out Stonehenge, even then it is not 100% solved, doesn't make it less fasicnating.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 03:35 PM
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reply to post by jeantherapy
 


I agree, I think there is more to this story.



posted on Aug, 16 2012 @ 03:37 PM
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reply to post by captaintyinknots
 


I live in civil war country. Now the civil war is was a very important aspect of our culture and needs to be preserved. But it has gotten to where every wall and ditch needs to be preserved, and if found on people's properties, the lose that part of their property. There is a point where enough is enough.

Now I have never been to Peru, would love to go. But is the country overly protective of culture?



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